Scientists gain insight into how Ebola virus uses the body's defenses to speed up infection
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  October 11, 2017  
  Ebola Virus  
  The latest Ebola virus news from News Medical  
 Scientists gain insight into how Ebola virus uses the body's defenses to speed up infectionScientists gain insight into how Ebola virus uses the body's defenses to speed up infection
 
Scientists from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have gained new insight into how the Ebola virus uses the body's natural defenses to speed the rate of infection and unleash its lethal disease, according to a new report in mBio.
 
 
 Northumbria researcher develops new, faster and safer way to diagnose Ebola virusNorthumbria researcher develops new, faster and safer way to diagnose Ebola virus
 
A new, faster and safer way of diagnosing the Ebola virus has been developed by an academic from Northumbria University, Newcastle.
 
   Ebola vaccine found to be safe and effective for adults and children in AfricaEbola vaccine found to be safe and effective for adults and children in Africa
 
Experts at St George's, University of London, have reported that an Ebola vaccine is safe for children as well as adults and produces an immune response.
 
   University of Hawaii researcher receives $6.3 million grant for trivalent Ebola vaccine developmentUniversity of Hawaii researcher receives $6.3 million grant for trivalent Ebola vaccine development
 
University of Hawaii vaccine researcher Axel Lehrer, PhD, has received a nearly $6.3 million grant to test whether the Ebola vaccine formula he has developed will protect against two additional viruses in the same family.
 
 Trusted messages proved essential to counter misperceptions during Ebola epidemic
 
Utilizing messages focused on images created by local artists and written information communicated through local dialects proved essential to counter misperceptions during the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, according to a study conducted in part by Muriel J. Harris, Ph.D., associate professor, University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences, Department of Health Promotion and Behavior Sciences.
 
 
 Penn study explains how acute viral infections can linger
 
Penn study explains how acute viral infections can lingerInfections caused by viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, measles, parainfluenza, and Ebola, are typically considered acute. These viruses cause disease quickly and live within a host for a limited time. But in some cases, the effects of the infection, and presence of the virus itself, can persist.