Epigenetics for Multiple Sclerosis
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  July 3, 2018  
  Multiple Sclerosis  
  The latest multiple sclerosis news from News Medical  
 Epigenetics for Multiple SclerosisEpigenetics for Multiple Sclerosis
 
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune disease which affects the myelin sheath surrounding the axon, causing axonal degeneration and neuronal loss.
 
   Rehabilitation technique for stroke appears beneficial for multiple sclerosis patientsRehabilitation technique for stroke appears beneficial for multiple sclerosis patients
 
A rehabilitation technique originally developed for stroke has now been shown to also be effective for improving function for people with multiple sclerosis, a neurodegenerative disease.
 
   Scientists discover new mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis riskScientists discover new mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis risk
 
While the DNA sequence remains the same throughout a person's life, the expression of the encoded genes may change with time and contribute to disease development in genetically predisposed individuals.
 
 Researchers discover unique process of brain cell death in MS
 
Researchers discover unique process of brain cell death in MSResearchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a unique process of brain cell death that affects the cells that are most vulnerable in multiple sclerosis.
 
 
 World MS Day
 
World MS DayToday, it is world MS day. We aim to raise awareness of the current research and how treating the condition has changed over the years.
 
 
 New approaches for treating cognitive and behavioral problems in individuals with MS
 
New approaches for treating cognitive and behavioral problems in individuals with MSMultiple sclerosis, the most common neurological disease among people of working age, can manifest with a wide array of physical and cognitive signs and symptoms. While cognitive deficits are common and can have significant impact on quality of life, there is a dearth of information on these effects for professionals who care for individuals with MS.
 
 
 Disintegrating brain lesions could predict disease progression in MS patients
 
Disintegrating brain lesions could predict disease progression in MS patientsFor decades, clinicians treating multiple sclerosis have interpreted the appearance of new or expanding brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging scans as a sign that a patient's disease is getting worse.