People with family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more quickly than others
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  August 9, 2017  
  Bipolar Disorder  
  The latest bipolar disorder news from News Medical  
 People with family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more quickly than othersPeople with family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more quickly than others
 
New King's College London research suggests that people with a family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more rapidly than those without a history of the disease.
 
 
 Researchers identify decreased brain pH levels in mouse models of mental disordersResearchers identify decreased brain pH levels in mouse models of mental disorders
 
Your body's acid/alkaline homeostasis, or maintenance of an adequate pH balance in tissues and organs, is important for good health.
 
   Sexual assault survivors have increased risk for suicide, mental health conditionsSexual assault survivors have increased risk for suicide, mental health conditions
 
An analysis of nearly 200 independent studies involving more than 230,000 adult participants finds that having been sexually assaulted is associated with significantly increased risk of anxiety, depression, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder.
 
   UAMS scientists awarded $422,610 NSF grant to study regulation of emotionUAMS scientists awarded $422,610 NSF grant to study regulation of emotion
 
A team of University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences research scientists recently received a $422,610 grant from the National Science Foundation to study the mechanisms of control of emotional responses of men and women using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
 
 UVA researchers identify connection between dopamine neurons and brain’s circadian center
 
UVA researchers identify connection between dopamine neurons and brain’s circadian centerNeurons in the brain that produce the pleasure-signaling neurotransmitter dopamine also directly control the brain's circadian center, or "body clock" - the area that regulates eating cycles, metabolism and waking/resting cycles - a key link that possibly affects the body's ability to adapt to jet lag and rotating shift work, a new University of Virginia study has demonstrated.
 
 
 Study finds brains of women to be more active than men
 
Study finds brains of women to be more active than menIn the largest functional brain imaging study to date, the Amen Clinics (Newport Beach, CA) compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women.