Bowel Cancer - A type of gut bacteria may increase risk of bowel cancer
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  The latest bowel cancer news from News Medical  
 

#ALT# NMR by IHC can still be MSI-H

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) detects the presence or absence of MMR proteins but won’t differentiate between functional and nonfunctional proteins. In contrast, MSI by PCR is a molecular test that determines if DNA mismatches are being repaired, making it a functional test for MMR protein activity.

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   A type of gut bacteria may increase risk of bowel cancerA type of gut bacteria may increase risk of bowel cancer
 
People with a certain type of bacteria in their guts may be more likely to develop bowel cancer. According to researcher Dr. Kaitlin Wade from the University of Bristol (UK), the study is the first to have used a technique called Mendelian randomization to explore the causal role the gut microbiome plays in the development of bowel cancer.
 
   Tumour conversion of glial cells when exposed to bowel cancer secretionsTumour conversion of glial cells when exposed to bowel cancer secretions
 
A new study has shown that glial cells of the gut (part of the enteric nervous system) when exposed to secretions from colon cancer cells are convert into tumours themselves. These altered glial cells then convert into promoters of tumours said the study researchers.
 
 New system enables real-time observations of individual cells in the colon
 
New system enables real-time observations of individual cells in the colonBiomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a system that allows for real-time observations of individual cells in the colon of a living mouse. Researchers expect the procedure to allow new investigations into the digestive system's microbiome as well as the causes of diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer and their treatments.
 
 
 The Achilles heel of APC-mutated colon tumors identified
 
The Achilles heel of APC-mutated colon tumors identifiedIn almost all cases of colon cancer, a specific gene is mutated – this offers opportunities to develop broadly effective therapeutic approaches. Research teams in Würzburg have taken this a step further.
 
 
 Study estimates the risk of false positives in colon cancer screening
 
Study estimates the risk of false positives in colon cancer screeningColorectal cancer can develop for months without producing any symptoms and, as soon as the first ones appear, sometimes the disease is already in an advanced stage. Screening programs allow to detect the disease when it is in its initial stages and, thus, to be able to treat it in time and increase the chances of cure.