ECU researchers develop world’s first blood test that detects melanoma in its early stages
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  August 22, 2018  
  Skin Cancer  
  The latest skin cancer news from News Medical  
 ECU researchers develop world’s first blood test that detects melanoma in its early stagesECU researchers develop world’s first blood test that detects melanoma in its early stages
 
Edith Cowan University researchers have developed the world’s first blood test capable of detecting melanoma in its early stages, a breakthrough that will save thousands of lives, as well as millions of dollars for the health system.
 
   'Skin Cancer, Take A Hike!' program promotes sun safety and skin cancer awareness'Skin Cancer, Take A Hike!' program promotes sun safety and skin cancer awareness
 
Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans in their lifetime.
 
   Study reviews accuracy, benefits, limitations of apps used for skin cancer diagnosisStudy reviews accuracy, benefits, limitations of apps used for skin cancer diagnosis
 
In the scramble to bring successful apps for the diagnosis of skin cancer to market there is a concern that a lack of testing is risking public safety, according to research led by the University of Birmingham.
 
 Organ transplant patients have higher risk for skin cancer
 
Organ transplant patients have higher risk for skin cancerWhile anyone can develop skin cancer, regardless of age, race or gender, certain groups of people have a higher risk of getting the disease than others.
 
 
 New research highlights value of free skin cancer screening program
 
New research highlights value of free skin cancer screening programWhile skin cancer can be deadly, it is also highly treatable when detected early. In fact, melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, has a five-year survival rate of 95 percent when detected and treated before it spreads to the lymph nodes; conversely, the five-year survival rates for regional and distant stage melanomas are 64 percent and 23 percent, respectively.
 
 
 Early detection plays big role in nail melanoma prognosis
 
Early detection plays big role in nail melanoma prognosisKarolina Jasko's nails were usually painted during her senior year of high school, so she didn't notice the black vertical line on her right thumbnail until a nail technician pointed it out -; and at the time, she didn't think much of it.
 
 
 Regular sunscreen use protects young people from melanoma
 
Regular sunscreen use protects young people from melanomaA world-first study led by University of Sydney has found that Australians aged 18-40 years who were regular users of sunscreen in childhood reduced their risk of developing melanoma by 40 percent, compared to those who rarely used sunscreen.