New analysis on skin cancer screening rates among indoor tanners
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  April 10, 2018  
  Skin Cancer  
  The latest skin cancer news from News Medical  
 Researchers create new compound that appears to activate cancer-fighting T cellsResearchers create new compound that appears to activate cancer-fighting T cells
 
Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are powerful weapons our body's immune systems count on to fight infection and combat diseases like cancer, multiple sclerosis, and lupus. Finding ways to spark these potent cells into action could lead to more effective cancer treatments and vaccines.
 
 
 New microbiopsy device could revolutionize testing for skin cancer, other diseasesNew microbiopsy device could revolutionize testing for skin cancer, other diseases
 
With at least two in three Australians diagnosed with skin cancer before the age of 70, monitoring moles and skin is vital in detecting skin cancer early for a generation of people who spent much of their upbringing in the sun (often with little to no protection).
 
   The Mechanism of DNA Damage by UV RadiationThe Mechanism of DNA Damage by UV Radiation
 
Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure triggers DNA damage, a preliminary step in the process of carcinogenesis. Exposure to UV radiation alters the structure of DNA, affecting the physiological processes of all living systems ranging from bacteria to humans.
 
   Topical solution may be less cytotoxic than cryosurgery for patients with seborrheic keratosisTopical solution may be less cytotoxic than cryosurgery for patients with seborrheic keratosis
 
Seborrheic keratosis is the most common noncancerous skin growth in adults seen by doctors in everyday practice.
 
 New fluorescent probe identifies cancer stem cells
 
New fluorescent probe identifies cancer stem cellsCells with stem-cell characteristics appear to be especially important in the formation and metastasis of tumors. Scientists have now developed a universal fluorescent probe for these "cancer stem cells". As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this dye also selectively kills off the cells.
 
 
 Largest genomic analysis supports additional classification of tumors
 
Largest genomic analysis supports additional classification of tumorsUniversity of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers are reporting the concluding findings from a major analysis of nearly 10,000 different tumor samples that focused on identifying similarities between cancers based on changes in their genes, and the way their genes are expressed.