Summer Is a Good Time to Check for Signs of Skin Cancer
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  June 27, 2018  
  Skin Cancer  
  The latest skin cancer news from News Medical  
 Summer Is a Good Time to Check for Signs of Skin CancerSummer Is a Good Time to Check for Signs of Skin Cancer
 
Summer time means shorts, tank tops, bathing suits – in other words, lots of exposure to the damaging UV rays of the sun. With more skin exposed, now is an especially good time to check for signs of skin cancer.
 
   New minimally invasive procedure shortens hospital stay for melanoma patientsNew minimally invasive procedure shortens hospital stay for melanoma patients
 
Lisa Chappell enjoys the summer sun, spending time outside and relaxing on the Coosa River at her Gadsden residence. Now, after being diagnosed with melanoma in 2015, she is much more cautious about her outdoor habits.
 
   Artificial intelligence algorithms appear to be better at detecting skin cancerArtificial intelligence algorithms appear to be better at detecting skin cancer
 
Researchers have shown for the first time that a form of artificial intelligence or machine learning known as a deep learning convolutional neural network is better than experienced dermatologists at detecting skin cancer.
 
 Ways to reduce your chances of getting skin cancer
 
Ways to reduce your chances of getting skin cancerSummer is here, but enjoying longer and sunnier days outdoors means your skin is vulnerable to sunburn. Experts at Yale Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine say unless you take the right precautions, sun exposure (even if you don't get scorched) can damage your skin, causing wrinkles, age spots and even skin cancer.
 
 
 Older melanoma patients fare better on immune checkpoint blockade therapy
 
Older melanoma patients fare better on immune checkpoint blockade therapyPatient age correlates with response to immunotherapy in melanoma and depleting regulatory T cells in young patients may have a therapeutic potential to enhance response in younger patients, according to research from The Wistar Institute. Study results were published online in Clinical Cancer Research.
 
 
 Dermatologist gives tips to safely use stick and spray sunscreen
 
Dermatologist gives tips to safely use stick and spray sunscreenSunscreen is a vital tool in the fight against skin cancer, including melanoma, the deadliest form. Research suggests that daily sunscreen use -; when used correctly -; could significantly cut the incidence of melanoma. This is why dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology advise their patients that the best sunscreen is the one they'll wear.
 
 
 Rare Skin Cancers
 
Rare Skin CancersSkin cancer affects more than 2 to 3 million people worldwide every year. There are many types of skin cancer, most of which are non-melanoma skin cancers. These include a subset of very rare skin cancers.