Researchers unlock genetic processes underlying cancer
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  December 6, 2017  
  Genetics  
  The latest Genetics news from News Medical  
 Researchers unlock genetic processes underlying cancerResearchers unlock genetic processes underlying cancer
 
For many, breast cancer is more than just a disease – it's personal. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives. But through new discoveries at the genetic level, the personal nature of cancer will eventually be what helps to beat it.
 
 
 New genetic study of mosquitoes demonstrates movement of insecticide resistance across AfricaNew genetic study of mosquitoes demonstrates movement of insecticide resistance across Africa
 
The largest ever genetic study of mosquitoes reveals the movement of insecticide resistance between different regions of Africa and finds several rapidly evolving insecticide resistance genes. Reported today) in Nature, this genetic resource will be used to develop new tools for monitoring resistance and managing insecticide use, and for designing novel control methods.
 
   Scientists identifies new genetic changes that increase risk of developing Hodgkin lymphomaScientists identifies new genetic changes that increase risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma
 
People who inherit genetic changes which alter the function of their immune system are at increased risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma, a major new study reports.
 
   Genetics may affect how the body responds to a particular dietGenetics may affect how the body responds to a particular diet
 
We can add one more thing to the list of traits affected by genetics: how our bodies respond to a particular diet.
 
   Research shows how cells rebuild nucleus, organize genome after divisionResearch shows how cells rebuild nucleus, organize genome after division
 
University of Bristol research has revealed how cells rebuild their nucleus and organise their genome when they divide - a discovery which could have major implications for understanding cancer and degeneration.
 
 Researchers discover rare genetic variant that offers protection against Alzheimer's disease
 
Researchers discover rare genetic variant that offers protection against Alzheimer's diseaseResearch published Wednesday in Genome Medicine details a novel and promising approach in the effort to treat Alzheimer's disease.
 
 
 DNA sequencing could identify genetic cause of kidney disease
 
DNA sequencing could identify genetic cause of kidney diseaseDNA sequencing could soon become part of the routine diagnostic workup for patients with chronic kidney disease, suggests a new study from Columbia University Medical Center.
 
 
 Genetic susceptibility to BD can increase suicide risk among people exposed to traumatic stress
 
Genetic susceptibility to BD can increase suicide risk among people exposed to traumatic stressGenetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder can increase the risk for suicide attempt, but only among those who also have experienced traumatic stress, reports a study published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
 
 
 Altering genetic mutation could enhance FluMist vaccine’s protective effect
 
Altering genetic mutation could enhance FluMist vaccine’s protective effectResearchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a genetic mutation in the FluMist intranasal flu vaccine that has the potential to be altered to enhance the vaccine's protective effect.
 
 
 Specific gene expression patterns could be key to younger looking skin
 
Specific gene expression patterns could be key to younger looking skinSome individuals' skin appears more youthful than their chronologic age. Although many people try to achieve this with creams, lotions, injections, and surgeries, new research published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology indicates that increased expression of certain genes may be the key to intrinsically younger looking - and younger behaving - skin.
 
 
 Easy-to-use omics toolkit sets the stage for new era of biology and precision medicine
 
Easy-to-use omics toolkit sets the stage for new era of biology and precision medicineMost complex diseases, such as obesity, longevity, and diabetes, are largely influenced by genetic factors. But at the same time, they are also modulated by environmental stimuli, such as diet and physical activity.
 
 
 New software could make real-time DNA-authentication a reality
 
New software could make real-time DNA-authentication a realityIn the science-fiction movie Gattaca, visitors only clear security if a blood test and readout of their genetic profile matches the sample on file. Now, cheap DNA sequencers and custom software could make real-time DNA-authentication a reality.
 
 
 Researchers create first semi-synthetic organism that can store and use unnatural genetic information
 
Researchers create first semi-synthetic organism that can store and use unnatural genetic informationResearchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed a bacterium that incorporates two unnatural bases, called X and Y, into genes, in addition to the four natural DNA bases − G, C, A and T − that usually code for proteins.
 
 
 Epitranscriptome Sequencing Technologies
 
Epitranscriptome Sequencing TechnologiesAn epitranscriptome is a set of functionally appropriate RNA modifications. There are nearly one hundred known modifications of RNA; the most common modification in internal mRNA is N6-methyladenosine (m6A). Transfer RNAs (tRNAs), mRNAs, and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are the three types of RNAs that are post-transcriptionally modified.
 
 
 Scientists take step toward solving puzzle about heart health in type 2 diabetes
 
Scientists take step toward solving puzzle about heart health in type 2 diabetesScientists at Joslin Diabetes Center have taken another step toward solving a long-standing puzzle about heart health in type 2 diabetes, with a finding that eventually may point towards more personalized patient care.
 
 
 Level of aerobic capacity determines future cardiovascular disease risk in children
 
Level of aerobic capacity determines future cardiovascular disease risk in childrenResearchers from the CTS-158 GALENO group at the University of Cadiz, directed by professor José Castro Piñero, have been working for three years on an important multicenter study based on an analysis of the influence of physical activity on the development of cardiovascular disease, a study in which they have taken into account environmental, nutritional, emotional and genetic factors, among others.
 
 
 NIH grant supports research on cellular mechanisms governing longevity
 
NIH grant supports research on cellular mechanisms governing longevityThe MDI Biological Laboratory has announced that Aric Rogers, Ph.D., has received a grant of $455,000 over two years from the National Institute on Aging, one of the institutes of the National Institutes of Health, for research on the cellular mechanisms governing longevity.
 
 
 Researchers identify vulnerability for glioblastoma subtypes
 
Researchers identify vulnerability for glioblastoma subtypesGlioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, typically fails to respond to treatment or rapidly becomes drug resistant.
 
 
 Specific protein negatively affects pancreatic cells and leads to cancer growth
 
Specific protein negatively affects pancreatic cells and leads to cancer growthPancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer and is currently very difficult to treat. However, the last few years have seen advances in the scientific understanding of how this cancer develops at a molecular level.
 
 
 Study uncovers genes that drive peanut allergy reactions
 
Study uncovers genes that drive peanut allergy reactionsMount Sinai researchers have identified six genes that activate hundreds of other genes in children experiencing severe allergic reactions to peanuts.
 
 
 TUM scientists discover emergency shut-off switch for T cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
 
TUM scientists discover emergency shut-off switch for T cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphomaSafety switches that automatically stop the device for example before it overheats are built into many electrical appliances. Cells are also equipped with such "emergency stop" functions. They make sure that a defective cell doesn't become a tumor cell.
 
 
 New mass-production platform overcomes barriers to bioengineering human liver tissues
 
New mass-production platform overcomes barriers to bioengineering human liver tissuesResearchers report creating a biologically accurate mass-production platform that overcomes major barriers to bioengineering human liver tissues suitable for therapeutic transplant into people.
 
 
 Overcoming Challenges of Assays of Complex Cellular Models with Real-Time Live-Cell Analysis
 
Overcoming Challenges of Assays of Complex Cellular Models with Real-Time Live-Cell AnalysisThere's a continued drive towards making in vitro assays ever more translational towards in vivo models and ultimately the clinic. This ties in with the resurgence of phenotypic screening and is a response to the perceived poor translation of the traditional simple cell-based assays, often developed to study just single protein targets.
 
 
 Challenges with Sanger Sequencing
 
Challenges with Sanger SequencingSanger sequencing is a method of sequencing DNA developed by Frederick Sanger in 1977. In Sanger sequencing, chain-terminating dideoxynucleotides are incorporated into the growing DNA chain at random positions. The sequence is then inferred from the set of incrementally terminated DNA chains separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.
 
 
 Human sperm may hold potential to serve as biomarkers of future health
 
Human sperm may hold potential to serve as biomarkers of future healthHuman sperm may hold the potential to serve as biomarkers of the future health of newborn infants, according to a new study by a Wayne State University School of Medicine research team.
 
 
 New study examines effects of gene variant on resting-state brain function in patients with MDD
 
New study examines effects of gene variant on resting-state brain function in patients with MDDA new study assessed the effects of a SLC6A15 gene variant on resting-state brain function in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), comparing the results with those in healthy individuals.
 
 
 New microscope optimized to perform studies using optogenetic techniques
 
New microscope optimized to perform studies using optogenetic techniquesA newly developed microscope is providing scientists with a greatly enhanced tool to study how neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease affect neuron communication.