New method based on artificial intelligence may help predict epilepsy outcomes
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  November 6, 2018  
  Epilepsy  
  The latest epilepsy news from News Medical  
 New method based on artificial intelligence may help predict epilepsy outcomesNew method based on artificial intelligence may help predict epilepsy outcomes
 
Medical University of South Carolina neurologists have developed a new method based on artificial intelligence that may eventually help both patients and doctors weigh the pros and cons of using brain surgery to treat debilitating seizures caused by epilepsy.
 
   Women with epilepsy have five times greater risk of dying during pregnancyWomen with epilepsy have five times greater risk of dying during pregnancy
 
The risk of dying during pregnancy is negligible for the average Danish woman, but if the woman in question has epilepsy, the probability must be multiplied by five. This is the central result presented in a comprehensive epidemiological study that researchers from Health, Aarhus University, are behind.
 
   Pioneering software system hopes to make epilepsy surgery safer and easierPioneering software system hopes to make epilepsy surgery safer and easier
 
A team of researchers, clinicians and engineers from UCLH, UCL, King's College London and the Epilepsy Society have developed a world-leading software system called EpiNav, which stands for epilepsy navigation, and their work is being featured on an episode of the BBC's Trust Me I'm a Doctor.
 
 FutureNeuro and Ergo partner to enhance eHealth infrastructure for providing better epilepsy care
 
FutureNeuro and Ergo partner to enhance eHealth infrastructure for providing better epilepsy careFutureNeuro, the SFI Research Centre for chronic and rare neurological conditions based at RCSI, has announced its partnership with Irish Cloud solution provider Ergo to enhance crucial eHealth infrastructure in Ireland and provide improved monitoring for people living with epilepsy.
 
 
 Neuroene Therapeutics receives $1.5 million NIH grant to develop anti-seizure compound for epilepsy
 
Neuroene Therapeutics receives $1.5 million NIH grant to develop anti-seizure compound for epilepsyNeuroene Therapeutics, a start-up company founded by mitochondrial biologist Sherine S. L. Chan, Ph.D. and medicinal chemist C. James Chou, Ph.D. of the Medical University of South Carolina, has received a $1.5 million NIH Phase II Small Business Innovation Research grant to optimize vitamin K analogues that could improve seizure control in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.
 
 
 What is Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy (EIEE)?
 
What is Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy (EIEE)?Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), also called Ohtahara syndrome, is a rare disorder characterized by infantile spasms. It has an early onset and symptoms generally occur before the age of one, with seizures often beginning before the tenth day of life. Spasms usually occur just after waking and involve bending at the waist and neck and stretching the arms and legs.
 
 
 Study: Neurons regulating reproductive hormone release have different activity in epileptic mice
 
Study: Neurons regulating reproductive hormone release have different activity in epileptic miceMice with epilepsy have altered patterns of neuron activity in the portion of the brain that controls the reproductive endocrine system, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study. Furthermore, the differences in neuron activity in female mice fluctuate across the reproductive cycle, the team found.
 
 
 Seizures start with a hush: A spike in inhibition
 
Seizures start with a hush: A spike in inhibitionSome patients describe epileptic seizures like an earthquake from within, starting slow and growing without their control. To a brain researcher, seizures are an electrical firestorm of neuronal activation in the brain.