Brain activity found to be perturbed between seizures in childhood absence epilepsy
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  October 3, 2017  
  Epilepsy  
  The latest epilepsy news from News Medical  
 Brain activity found to be perturbed between seizures in childhood absence epilepsyBrain activity found to be perturbed between seizures in childhood absence epilepsy
 
New research shows that in a mouse model of childhood absence epilepsy, brain activity is perturbed between seizures. The researchers speculate that this could underlie cognitive problems of the disease, which can persist despite treatment of seizures.
 
 
 Researchers use computer simulations to provide better insight into epilepsy surgeryResearchers use computer simulations to provide better insight into epilepsy surgery
 
Results from an unexpected quarter is could help neurologists to identify which brain region to remove to eliminate an epilepsy patient's symptoms. Mathematicians from the University of Twente, together with researchers from the University Medical Center Utrecht, have shown that it is sensible to examine the interconnections between different brain regions closely, instead of searching for abnormal regions only.
 
   New tissue-chip research aims to speed drug development for two genetic forms of epilepsyNew tissue-chip research aims to speed drug development for two genetic forms of epilepsy
 
An interdisciplinary team of Vanderbilt University researchers has received a two-year, $2-million federal grant to develop an "organ-on-chip" model for two genetic forms of epilepsy. These disorders affect both brain and heart and improved modeling could lead to new drug treatments.
 
   Research provides new insights on the border between conscious and unconscious perceptionResearch provides new insights on the border between conscious and unconscious perception
 
Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception.
 
   Nerve stimulation therapy revives a 35-year-old man in vegetative state – sparks hopeNerve stimulation therapy revives a 35-year-old man in vegetative state – sparks hope
 
A 20-year-old man from France fifteen years back met with a car accident and suffered damage to his brain putting him is a vegetative state or a state where from he never regained consciousness. Now he is 35 years and an experimental low-intensity nerve stimulation method has been found to stir him into a “minimally conscious state”.
 
 Young people taking anti-epileptic drugs experience bone health issues, study finds
 
In a study published in Epilepsia, young people taking anti-epileptic drugs experienced elevated rates of bone fractures and had reductions in tibial bone mineral density and lower limb muscle force.
 
 
 Renishaw to exhibit medical robots at SBNS Autumn Meeting
 
Renishaw to exhibit medical robots at SBNS Autumn MeetingGlobal engineering and scientific technologies company, Renishaw will attend the Society of British Neurological Surgeons Autumn Meeting. The event will take place at The Titanic Hotel, Liverpool, from 20th – 22nd September 2017.
 
 
 New method to 'sneak' biological drugs into brain cells offers hope to cure neurological diseases
 
New method to 'sneak' biological drugs into brain cells offers hope to cure neurological diseasesThe treatment of brain diseases is on the verge of a breakthrough. Researchers from Aalborg University are developing a new method that 'smuggles' medicine past the brain's defense systems, giving hope that diseases such as Alzheimer's can one day be cured.
 
 
 Researchers identify connections between toxoplasmosis and several brain disorders
 
Researchers identify connections between toxoplasmosis and several brain disordersMore than 2 billion people – nearly one out of every three humans on earth, including about 60 million people in the United States – have a lifelong infection with the brain-dwelling parasite Toxoplasma gondii.