Cardiology - Could Daylight Saving Time Increase Heart Attack Risk?
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  June 11, 2019  
  Cardiology  
  The latest cardiology news from News Medical  
 Study aims to optimize device implantation in patients with atrial fibrillation and stroke riskStudy aims to optimize device implantation in patients with atrial fibrillation and stroke risk
 
According to clinical studies, about a third of patients with atrial fibrillation will suffer a stroke during their lifetime. Between 70 and 90% of these strokes are caused by a thrombus formed in the left atrial appendage.
 
 
    KeysightCould Daylight Saving Time Increase Heart Attack Risk?
 
Although daylight saving time might seem like an excellent way to save energy, no study has demonstrated any clear outcomes. Actually, it has more adverse effects than advantages. Recent research works have underlined that clock changes elevate the risk of heart attacks. Minor sleep deprivation induced by this time shift results in circadian misalignment, which increases the heart attack risks by nearly 30%.
 
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   Decline in ischemic stroke among middle-aged adults not as steep as in older peopleDecline in ischemic stroke among middle-aged adults not as steep as in older people
 
Although the occurrence of first-ever ischemic stroke (strokes due to a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the brain) at middle age has been decreasing over time, researchers have found that the decline is not as steep as seen in older adults.
 
 Reprieve Cardiovascular announces results of clinical trials in patients with acute heart failure
 
Reprieve Cardiovascular announces results of clinical trials in patients with acute heart failureReprieve Cardiovascular, a pioneering medical device company focused on improving outcomes for patients suffering from Acute Decompensated Heart Failure, today announced the results of two non-randomized, prospective clinical trials in patients hospitalized with Acute Heart Failure.
 
 
 Sleep extension may help reduce cardiometabolic risk
 
Sleep extension may help reduce cardiometabolic riskIncreasing sleep duration may help reduce cardiometabolic risk--or the risk of heart disease and metabolic disorders-- in individuals who do not get enough sleep, according to an analysis of all published studies on the topic.
 
 
 Flash fire in patient's chest cavity during emergency heart surgery
 
Flash fire in patient's chest cavity during emergency heart surgeryAt this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (1-3 June), doctors present the unique case of a man who suffered a flash fire in his chest cavity during emergency heart surgery caused by supplemental oxygen leaking from a ruptured lung.
 
 
 New imaging method to identify patients with ischemic heart disease
 
New imaging method to identify patients with ischemic heart diseaseAn international team led by scientists from Lawson Health Research Institute and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are the first to show that Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to measure how the heart uses oxygen for both healthy patients and those with heart disease.
 
 
 Eating blueberries daily reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease
 
Eating blueberries daily reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseaseEating a cup of blueberries a day reduces risk factors for cardiovascular disease - according to new research led by the University of East Anglia, in collaboration with colleagues from Harvard and across the UK.
 
 
 Study finds greater risk of heart failure, stroke among occupants in motor vehicle accidents
 
Study finds greater risk of heart failure, stroke among occupants in motor vehicle accidentsNew research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents.
 
 
 Nerve stimulation therapy could help patients with the most common type of stroke
 
Nerve stimulation therapy could help patients with the most common type of strokeResearch led by a UCLA scientist found that a new nerve stimulation therapy to increase blood flow could help patients with the most common type of stroke up to 24 hours after onset.