Vaccinated pediatric cancer patients just as likely as unvaccinated peers to develop flu
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  October 22, 2017  
  Pediatrics  
  The latest pediatrics news from News Medical  
 Vaccinated pediatric cancer patients just as likely as unvaccinated peers to develop fluVaccinated pediatric cancer patients just as likely as unvaccinated peers to develop flu
 
Young leukemia patients who were vaccinated against influenza were just as likely as their unvaccinated peers to develop flu, suggesting that additional steps are necessary to protect high-risk individuals. These findings from the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study appear October 16, 2017, in the Journal of Pediatrics.
 
 
 ObesityWeek: Effective approaches to prevent and treat pediatric obesityObesityWeek: Effective approaches to prevent and treat pediatric obesity
 
Childhood obesity has more than tripled since the early 1970s and has become one of the most pressing public health concerns of our time.
 
   Increased use of split liver transplantation could decrease pediatric waitlist deathsIncreased use of split liver transplantation could decrease pediatric waitlist deaths
 
A new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting - held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases - found that increased utilization of split liver transplantation (sharing a donor liver between one pediatric and one adult patient) could decrease the number of children who die awaiting liver transplantation without decreasing liver transplantation access for adult patients.
 
   New vaccine for pneumonia holds promise to save thousands of livesNew vaccine for pneumonia holds promise to save thousands of lives
 
In 2004, pneumonia killed more than 2 million children worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. By 2015, the number was less than 1 million.
 
 New study describes how gene-environment interaction leads to congenital heart defects
 
New study describes how gene-environment interaction leads to congenital heart defectsInfants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.
 
 
 Higher vitamin D dosing decreases risk of premature infants having low bone density
 
Higher vitamin D dosing decreases risk of premature infants having low bone densityResults of a University of Nebraska Medical Center study published in the Oct. 10 issue of PLOS ONE, found if the standard supplementation of 400 IUs of vitamin D is increased to 800 IUs daily there are reductions in the number of premature and preterm babies with extremely low bone density.
 
 
 Poll: Some parents may take children to ER for common situations that could be handled at home
 
Poll: Some parents may take children to ER for common situations that could be handled at homeIf a child gets a small burn from a hot pan, starts choking or swallows medication, parents may struggle to decide whether to provide first aid at home or rush them to the hospital, suggests a new national poll.