Dermatology - Study shows why antihistamine drugs fail to control severe itch in eczema patients
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  The latest dermatology news from News Medical  
 DermaSensors: The Future of Skin Cancer DetectionDermaSensors: The Future of Skin Cancer Detection
 
The DermaSensor device is a revolutionary, non-invasive and spectroscopy-based tool that can assist clinicians in early skin cancer diagnosis.
 
   Study shows why antihistamine drugs fail to control severe itch in eczema patientsStudy shows why antihistamine drugs fail to control severe itch in eczema patients
 
In addition to a skin rash, many eczema sufferers also experience chronic itching, but sometimes that itching can become torturous. Worse, antihistamines -- the standard treatment for itching and allergy -- often don't help.
 
   Novel non-steroid topical cream can safely and effectively treat plaque psoriasisNovel non-steroid topical cream can safely and effectively treat plaque psoriasis
 
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by erythematous (red) patches and plaques.
 
 Study shows that risk of autoimmune disease lupus is higher in females
 
Study shows that risk of autoimmune disease lupus is higher in femalesThe US prevalence of the autoimmune disease lupus is 72.8 cases per 100,000 individuals, according to an analysis of population-based registries.
 
 
 Study reveals new insights into how UV light triggers kidney inflammation in lupus patients
 
Study reveals new insights into how UV light triggers kidney inflammation in lupus patientsA new collaborative study from researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and the University of Washington (UW) and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals unexpected insights into how skin exposure to ultraviolet light can worsen clinical symptoms in autoimmune diseases such as lupus.
 
 
 Skin cancer has increased significantly in the last four decades
 
Skin cancer has increased significantly in the last four decadesIncidence rates of skin cancer (cutaneous malignant melanoma) have increased more than 550% in males and 250% in females since the early 1980s in England - according to a new study by Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS).