Rheumatology - Researchers identify inflammatory mechanism related to bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis
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 Regenerating bone marrow after chemotherapyRegenerating bone marrow after chemotherapy
 
In this interview, AZoLifeSciences speaks to Professor Masaru Ishii about his latest research that investigated how bone marrow regenerates after chemotherapy.
 
   Researchers identify inflammatory mechanism related to bone damage in rheumatoid arthritisResearchers identify inflammatory mechanism related to bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis
 
In a study aimed at investigating the mechanism responsible for exacerbating rheumatoid arthritis in smokers, researchers at the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases, linked to the University of São Paulo in Brazil, discovered a novel path in the inflammatory process associated with the bone damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis.
 
   GBP5 protein may play a key role in suppressing inflammation in rheumatoid arthritisGBP5 protein may play a key role in suppressing inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis
 
New research led by scientists at Washington State University has found that a protein known as GBP5 appears to play a key role in suppressing inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, a potentially debilitating disease in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own joint tissues.
 
   Researchers explore potential role of TARM1 protein in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritisResearchers explore potential role of TARM1 protein in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis
 
TARM1 is a receptor protein whose role in the functioning of the immune system is unknown. In a new study, scientists from Japan have explored the potential role of TARM1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis by analyzing mouse models.
 
   Biological “feed-forward” loop contributes to progression of osteoarthritisBiological “feed-forward” loop contributes to progression of osteoarthritis
 
An unfortunate biological "feed-forward" loop drives cartilage cells in an arthritic joint to actually contribute to progression of the disease, say researchers at Duke University and Washington University in Saint Louis.