Gastroenterology - Can you Treat a Food Allergy by Altering the Gut Microbiome?
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#ALT# MMR by IHC can still be MSI-H

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) detects the presence or absence of MMR proteins but won’t differentiate between functional and nonfunctional proteins. In contrast, MSI by PCR is a molecular test that determines if DNA mismatches are being repaired, making it a functional test for MMR protein activity.

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   Can you Treat a Food Allergy by Altering the Gut Microbiome?Can you Treat a Food Allergy by Altering the Gut Microbiome?
 
Food allergy refers to an abnormal immune reaction to harmless proteins in food (referred to as allergens) that repeatedly occurs on exposure to the proteins and causes mild to severe symptoms, ranging from an itchy mouth through to the life-threatening allergic reaction anaphylaxis.
 
   Gastric bypass associated with higher risk of additional operationsGastric bypass associated with higher risk of additional operations
 
Research from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds that gastric bypass is associated with a higher risk of additional operations or other invasive procedures, compared to a gastric sleeve procedure.
 
 What Does the Large Intestine Do?
 
What Does the Large Intestine Do?The large intestine is part of the alimentary canal, which responsible for absorbing water from indigestible food. Measuring approximately six feet long, the large intestine is made up of four main parts: the cecum, the colon, the rectum, and the anus.
 
 
 Is There a Link Between Migraine and the Gut Microbiome?
 
Is There a Link Between Migraine and the Gut Microbiome?The intestine is in constant communication with the brain, and the gut microbiome is an important contributor in this. The combined total of these microbes is referred to as the gut microbiome, changes in which have been linked to a number of neurological and psychiatric conditions including depression, anxiety, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and multiple sclerosis.
 
 
 Gastroesophageal reflux disease may affect nearly a third of U.S. adults every week
 
Gastroesophageal reflux disease may affect nearly a third of U.S. adults every weekGastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive disorder that causes hearburn and other uncomfortable symptoms, may affect nearly a third of U.S. adults each week, and most of those who take certain popular medications for it still have symptoms, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study.