Analysis does not reveal consistent link between NSAIDs use and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease
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  April 12, 2018  
  Gastroenterology‎  
  The latest gastroenterology‎ news from News Medical  
 Analysis does not reveal consistent link between NSAIDs use and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel diseaseAnalysis does not reveal consistent link between NSAIDs use and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease
 
Contrary to generally accepted belief, a recent review and analysis of published studies did not reveal a consistent association between the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or acetaminophen and exacerbation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
 
 
 Research links DNA variants to increased risk of IBS in womenResearch links DNA variants to increased risk of IBS in women
 
New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet in Sweden links certain DNA variants to increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome in women. The findings, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, might help explain why IBS is more common in women than in men.
 
   New guideline on use of endoscopic eradication therapy in Barrett's esophagusNew guideline on use of endoscopic eradication therapy in Barrett's esophagus
 
The latest issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the official journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, includes a new society guideline on use of endoscopic eradication therapy Barrett's esophagus.
 
   Newly expanded program at Rush offers relief from pelvic floor problemsNewly expanded program at Rush offers relief from pelvic floor problems
 
Trouble with urine or bowel control, bladder pain, recurring urinary tract infections, constipation and other sexual function issues frequently can be traced to a dysfunctional pelvic floor -- the layer of muscles that support the bladder and bowel in men, and bladder, bowel and vagina in women.
 
   Specific small-bowel microbes regulate digestion and absorption of fats, study showsSpecific small-bowel microbes regulate digestion and absorption of fats, study shows
 
Although the vast majority of research on the gut microbiome has focused on bacteria in the large intestine, a new study-;one of a few to concentrate on microbes in the upper gastrointestinal tract-;shows how the typical calorie-dense western diet can induce expansion of microbes that promote the digestion and absorption of high-fat foods.
 
 Wound protector use linked to statistically significant reduction in SSI, study shows
 
Wound protector use linked to statistically significant reduction in SSI, study showsSurgical site infection is a common occurrence among patients who have had gastrointestinal surgery, with reported infection rates varying from 4 to 25 percent.
 
 
 New review explores potentially safer therapies for treating chronic abdominal pain
 
New review explores potentially safer therapies for treating chronic abdominal painAn estimated 2 million people in the U.S. are addicted to prescription opioids- powerful doctor-prescribed medications for chronic or severe pain. The drugs are commonly prescribed to treat gastrointestinal pain caused by conditions such as Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), raising the risk of addiction among this population.
 
 
 Gut bacteria may hold clues to predict effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies
 
Gut bacteria may hold clues to predict effectiveness of cancer immunotherapiesThe composition of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract may hold clues to help predict which cancer patients are most apt to benefit from the personalized cellular therapies that have shown unprecedented promise in the fight against hard-to-treat cancers, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
 
 App-based self-acupressure benefits women with menstrual pain
 
App-based self-acupressure benefits women with menstrual painCan acupressure achieve a sustained reduction in menstrual pain? Is an app-based self-care program particularly attractive to young women? These questions addressed in a new study by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the results of which have been published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
 
 
 First-in-human clinical trial of retinal implant to treat dry AMD
 
First-in-human clinical trial of retinal implant to treat dry AMDAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects more than 1.75 million individuals in the United States. Because the population is aging, that number will increase to almost 3 million by 2020. Between 80 and 90 percent of cases in this country are the dry version of the condition, for which no effective treatment exists.
 
 
 New trial to test stem cell-based retinal implant for dry age-related macular degeneration
 
New trial to test stem cell-based retinal implant for dry age-related macular degenerationPhysicians and researchers at the USC Roski Eye Institute have collaborated with other California institutions to show that a first-in-kind stem cell-based retinal implant is feasible for use in people with advanced dry age-related macular degeneration.
 
 
 New artificial enzyme uses visible light to kill bacteria
 
New artificial enzyme uses visible light to kill bacteriaResearchers from RMIT University have developed a new artificial enzyme that uses light to kill bacteria.
 
 
 Research reveals role of colon signaling pathway in development of IBD
 
Research reveals role of colon signaling pathway in development of IBDThe intestine encounters more foreign substances, and potential toxins, than other parts of the body, so it is not surprising that a healthy gut is maintained by the tight control of immune responses.
 
 
 Getting better prepared to treat in-flight medical emergencies
 
Getting better prepared to treat in-flight medical emergencies"Ladies and gentlemen, is there a physician on board?" The flight attendant on a flight from Rwanda to Turkey made the announcement no one wants to hear, and Rachel Zang, MD, an Emergency Medicine resident at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, jumped into action.
 
 
 Researchers unravel immunopathogenesis of Johne's disease
 
Researchers unravel immunopathogenesis of Johne's diseaseA research team has unraveled the immunopathogenesis of Johne's disease, a chronic bovine disease that has caused endemics in Japan and many other countries, placing financial burdens on cattle farmers.
 
 
 Dehydration Signs and Symptoms in Children
 
Dehydration Signs and Symptoms in ChildrenDehydration is a term which refers to the significant depletion of water in the body. It is a common condition among children and infants and accounts for a significant percentage of child morbidity and mortality worldwide.
 
 
 What is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?
 
What is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a term used for a group of rare connective tissue disorders characterized by abnormalities in collagen. The typical signs of EDS include hypermobile joints and skin that can stretch beyond the usual. This condition may often lead to life-threatening impediments in severe cases.
 
 
 Clinical Features of Microsporidiosis
 
Clinical Features of MicrosporidiosisMicrosporidia are unicellular and obligate intracellular eukaryotic parasites related to fungi and characterized by a unique mechanism of infecting host cells. They are widely considered underdiagnosed agents of infection (in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals) due to impediments in their detection, various clinical presentations, and subsequent dissemination to the environment. The disease they cause is known as microsporidiosis.
 
 
 What is the Triple Screen in Pregnancy?
 
What is the Triple Screen in Pregnancy?The triple screen is a blood screening test that is done in the second trimester of pregnancy to provide a risk estimate for the occurrence of Down syndrome in the fetus. It consists of three tests, the results of which are combined with the maternal age to derive the risk:
 
 
 Low and high HDL cholesterol linked to higher risk of infectious disease
 
Low and high HDL cholesterol linked to higher risk of infectious diseaseMost people recognize that there is a relationship between cholesterol levels and risk of heart disease. But new research from Copenhagen University Hospital and University of Copenhagen shows that a certain kind of cholesterol might affect our health differently, that is, through a role in the immune system.