Gastroenterology - Specific cell-to-cell communication associated with progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumors
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Debilitating gastrointestinal symptoms could be controlled with diet and lifestyle modificationsFood and Ingredient Development Opportunities for Microbiome Modulation

Humankind faces a crisis of non-communicable chronic diseases that encompass pathologies such as obesity (and its co-morbidities), inflammatory bowel diseases, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Microbiome alterations (dysbioses) induced through lifestyle and diet have been implicated in this development. There is tremendous potential for the targeted modulation and restoration of gut microbiota composition and functionality to combat chronic diseases.

In this Webinar, Prof. Jens Walter (APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork) will discuss:

- The latest innovations in the area of nutrition and functional ingredients that enable a targeted and health-oriented modulation and/or restoration of gut microbiome composition and function.

- Advances in our ecological and mechanistic understanding of how dietary components interact with the gut microbiota in relation to health do now provide a solid foundation for the rational design of food products and medical foods for tangible health outcomes.

Register Here
 
   Specific cell-to-cell communication associated with progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumorsSpecific cell-to-cell communication associated with progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumors
 
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are a subytpe of cancers known as sarcomas. GIST is the most common type of sarcoma with approximately 5,000 to 6,000 new patient cases annually in the United States.
 
   New diagnostic imaging tool measures naturally occurring enzymes in the gastrointestinal tractNew diagnostic imaging tool measures naturally occurring enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract
 
A healthy person has a general balance of good and bad bacteria. But that balance is thrown off when someone gets sick.
 
   Discovery of ‘Achilles heel’ in gut bacteria may lead to targeted therapies for Crohn’s diseaseDiscovery of ‘Achilles heel’ in gut bacteria may lead to targeted therapies for Crohn’s disease
 
The discovery of an "Achilles heel" in a type of gut bacteria that causes intestinal inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease may lead to more targeted therapies for the difficult to treat disease, according to Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators.
 
   Nanotherapy shows potential for treating severe Crohn's diseaseNanotherapy shows potential for treating severe Crohn's disease
 
Scientists from the Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago demonstrated that a nanotherapy reduces intestinal inflammation and shrinks lesions in a rodent model of severe Crohn's disease.