Study reveals role of specific lipids in accelerating or curbing bacterial infection
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  November 13, 2017  
  Medical Device  
  The latest medical device news from News Medical  
 Study reveals role of specific lipids in accelerating or curbing bacterial infectionStudy reveals role of specific lipids in accelerating or curbing bacterial infection
 
Lipids appear to play an important role in infections. According to researchers from the University of Maastricht in Maastricht, The Netherlands, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in Baltimore, Md., USA, specific lipids can greatly accelerate bacterial infection.
 
 
 Purchase of Livecyte heralds start of collaboration between University of Manchester and PhasefocusPurchase of Livecyte heralds start of collaboration between University of Manchester and Phasefocus
 
Following a successful funding application, staff at the University of Manchester, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Matrix Research, have become the proud owners of a Livecyte Cell Imaging & Analysis System.
 
   Aspect Imaging announces receipt of CE marking for neonatal-dedicated MRI systemAspect Imaging announces receipt of CE marking for neonatal-dedicated MRI system
 
Aspect Imaging, a developer of compact high-performance MRI systems, announces today that it has received CE marking for the neonatal-dedicated MRI system, Embrace Neonatal MRI System, which enables preparation and scanning of newborns, without having to transport them from the NICU. Embrace® Neonatal MRI can now be used and sold in EU countries and in non-EU countries that rely on CE certification.
 
   Milestone study could impact standard guidelines for stroke treatmentMilestone study could impact standard guidelines for stroke treatment
 
Standard guidelines for stroke treatment currently recommend clot removal only within six hours of stroke onset. But a milestone study with results published today in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that clot removal up to 24 hours after stroke led to significantly reduced disability for properly selected patients.
 
   Broken Heart/Takotsubo Syndrome ComplicationsBroken Heart/Takotsubo Syndrome Complications
 
Broken heart syndrome, or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), is a temporary and reversible disease presenting as an unexpected weakening of the left ventricular myocardium. It mainly occurs in individuals who are undergoing sudden and intense stressful conditions. The mortality rate in TCM is between 0% and 8% and the left ventricle function typically regains normality within 1–4 weeks.
 
 Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Measurement using IR-Spectroscopy
 
Diabetes is a disease involving chronically high sugar levels in the blood, and around 422 million people across the world are suffering from this disease.
 
 
 Broken Heart/Takotsubo Syndrome Signs and Symptoms
 
Broken Heart/Takotsubo Syndrome Signs and SymptomsTakotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), also known as apical ballooning syndrome or acute stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a condition in which the heart suddenly dysfunctions. The tip of the left ventricle becomes enlarged and weakened due to sudden intense physical or emotional stress. It is a temporary condition typically followed by complete recovery of the affected individual within a few weeks.
 
 
 Current and Future Applications of Optogenetics
 
Current and Future Applications of OptogeneticsOptogenetics is the science of using light to control the behavior of cells. It is one of the most rapidly evolving fields of applied research. Optogenetic techniques enable the control of electrically excitable cells such as muscle or nerve cells.
 
 
 Adipocytes may reduce effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drug
 
Adipocytes may reduce effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugAdipocytes, or fat cells, can absorb and metabolize the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin, reducing the effectiveness of the drug and potentially contributing to poorer treatment outcomes.
 
 
 Study findings could help reduce unnecessary testing in children with postoperative fever
 
Study findings could help reduce unnecessary testing in children with postoperative feverDespite a low likelihood of positive results, children who develop fever in the first two days after surgery are often subjected to non-targeted, costly and invasive testing. This is according to a study that was recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery.