ASU Biodesign researchers develop more potent, safer plant-based Zika vaccine
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  August 17, 2017  
  Zika Virus  
  The latest Zika virus news from News Medical  
 ASU Biodesign researchers develop more potent, safer plant-based Zika vaccineASU Biodesign researchers develop more potent, safer plant-based Zika vaccine
 
The worldwide Zika threat first emerged in 2015, infecting millions as it swept across the Americas. It struck great fear in pregnant women, as babies born with severe brain birth defects quickly overburdened hospitals and public health care systems.
 
 
 Researchers develop rapid test for Zika virus diagnosisResearchers develop rapid test for Zika virus diagnosis
 
Washington University in St. Louis researchers have developed a test that quickly detects the presence of Zika virus in blood.
 
   Researchers investigate how previous exposure to West Nile virus affects Zika infectionResearchers investigate how previous exposure to West Nile virus affects Zika infection
 
West Nile virus is no stranger to the U.S.-Mexico border; thousands of people in the region have contracted the mosquito-borne virus in the past. But could this previous exposure affect how intensely Zika sickens someone now?
 
   FDA issues Emergency Use Authorization for multiplex Zika testFDA issues Emergency Use Authorization for multiplex Zika test
 
The Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an Emergency Use Authorization for the CII-ArboViroPlex rRT-PCR Test, the first multiplex assay that simultaneously tests for the presence of Zika virus, all serotypes of dengue virus, chikungunya virus, and West Nile virus, as well as a host gene that ensures the accuracy of results.
 
 Researchers identify role of blood-filtering organs in fighting against viral infections
 
Researchers identify role of blood-filtering organs in fighting against viral infectionsNew information about how and where the innate immune system fights off viral infections that enter through the skin could lead to better treatments for viruses like Zika, dengue and measles, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
 
 
 Understanding the rise in NTM infections
 
Understanding the rise in NTM infectionsIt is important to keep in mind that nontuberculous mycobacteria are environmental, and so unlike mycobacterial tuberculosis, generally this is not a person to person transmitted disease. The organisms are found universally in water and soil and so most people are exposed on a daily basis.