Biochemistry - Researchers identify new mechanism by which cancer cells become resistant to ferroptosis
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  October 22, 2019  
  Biochemistry  
  The latest biochemistry news from AZoNetwork  
 

#ALT# Understanding the Biochemistry of Synthetic Bone Grafting Biomaterials

This guide discusses the key aspects that differentiate synthetic bone grafting products including hydroxyapatite, beta tricalcium phosphate, biphasic calcium phosphate mineral, calcium sulfate and bioactive glasses, along with their interaction within the body.

Download the Synthetic Bone Grafting Biomaterials Guide
 
   Researchers identify new mechanism by which cancer cells become resistant to ferroptosisResearchers identify new mechanism by which cancer cells become resistant to ferroptosis
 
An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs.
 
   Columbia researchers capture new detailed images of a temperature-sensing moleculeColumbia researchers capture new detailed images of a temperature-sensing molecule
 
Columbia University researchers have captured new detailed images of a temperature-sensing molecule in its open, intermediate, and closed states.
 
 The atomic-level structure of DNA polymerase delta – the enzyme behind DNA replication
 
The atomic-level structure of DNA polymerase delta – the enzyme behind DNA replicationA new study has revealed how the fundamental enzyme called DNA polymerase delta operates during DNA replication, making a copy of the genetic code that can be transmitted through the generations.
 
 
 Peptide-based nanoparticles can suppress pancreatic cancer growth without adverse effects
 
Peptide-based nanoparticles can suppress pancreatic cancer growth without adverse effectsDespite advances in cancer survival, more than 90 percent of people with pancreatic cancer die within five years. Most patients with pancreatic tumors (and half of those with colorectal cancers) carry a mutation in the KRAS gene, which normally controls cell growth and death.
 
 
 Creatine serves as a molecular battery to power killer T cells' fight against cancer
 
Creatine serves as a molecular battery to power killer T cells' fight against cancerCreatine, the organic acid that is popularly taken as a supplement by athletes and bodybuilders, serves as a molecular battery for immune cells by storing and distributing energy to power their fight against cancer, according to new UCLA research.