Genomics - Researchers use single cell genome sequencing to study malaria transmission
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#ALT#Using Gene Editing and iPSC Differentiation to Model Neurological Disease

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and gene-editing technology provide an unparalleled biomedical prospect for disease modeling, development of therapeutic strategies, and high-throughput drug screening for neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s Huntingdon’s and Parkinson’s.

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   Researchers use single cell genome sequencing to study malaria transmissionResearchers use single cell genome sequencing to study malaria transmission
 
New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D. Dr.
 
   DNA site GEDmatch sold to forensic genomics firmDNA site GEDmatch sold to forensic genomics firm
 
The genetic genealogy website that was instrumental in catching the infamous Golden State Killer has been bought by a genomics firm that conducts next-generation sequencing in forensic applications. This has prompted discussion over the future use of this data in helping US police to solve crime.
 
 Scientists extract complete human genome from a thousands-of-years old “chewing gum”
 
Scientists extract complete human genome from a thousands-of-years old “chewing gum”It seems that chewing gum is not a new trend! Researchers have found chewing gum that is 5,700 years old and it has provided clues regarding ancient DNA. A study with the findings was published in the journal Nature Communications. It is titled, “A 5,700-year-old human genome and oral microbiome from chewed birch pitch.”
 
 
 Epigenome editing could repair genetic brain disorder
 
Epigenome editing could repair genetic brain disorderA new study published in the journal Nature Communications shows that it may be possible to reverse gene mutations that cause brain disorders, using a very precisely targeted epigenome editing technique. This type of gene editing does not change the gene’s DNA sequence itself but is focused on correcting epigenome changes only.
 
 
 Precision epigenome editing can repair genetic syndrome of intellectual disability
 
Precision epigenome editing can repair genetic syndrome of intellectual disabilityUsing a targeted gene epigenome editing approach in the developing mouse brain, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers reversed one gene mutation that leads to the genetic disorder WAGR syndrome, which causes intellectual disability and obesity in people.
 
 
 Some genetic sequencing misses out large parts of the genome
 
Some genetic sequencing misses out large parts of the genomeA study of patient samples has found that more than a quarter of genes are missed in genetic sequencing procedures. This could mean the genetic disorder detection could be flawed, say the researchers. The results of the new study titled, "Clinical Exome Studies Have Inconsistent Coverage," have been published in the latest issue of the journal Clinical Chemistry.