Zika Virus: What Does the Future Hold?
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  June 27, 2018  
  Infectious Diseases  
  The latest infectious diseases news from News Medical  
 Zika Virus: What Does the Future Hold?Zika Virus: What Does the Future Hold?
 
Following the Zika virus epidemic that swept across Brazil between 2015-2016, Dr. Julia Clarke and her team begun working to establish the long-term effects of Zika, and recently discovered that TNF-a inhibitors can be used to prevent microencephaly.
 
   Researchers create new modeling framework that takes a zoonotic perspective on EbolaResearchers create new modeling framework that takes a zoonotic perspective on Ebola
 
Javier Buceta, associate professor of bioengineering, Paolo Bocchini, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, and postdoctoral student Graziano Fiorillo of Lehigh University have created a modeling framework that takes a zoonotic perspective on Ebola.
 
   Malaria-causing parasite seeks refuge inside the liver to replicate and surviveMalaria-causing parasite seeks refuge inside the liver to replicate and survive
 
When the malaria-causing Plasmodium parasite first slips into the human bloodstream, injected by the bite of an infected mosquito, it does not immediately target red blood cells.
 
 Researchers gain new insights into hepatitis B virus
 
Researchers gain new insights into hepatitis B virusResearchers at the University of Delaware, working with colleagues at Indiana University, have gained new insights into the virus that causes hepatitis B -- a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide.
 
 
 New study unravels secrets of HIV's persistence
 
New study unravels secrets of HIV's persistenceThanks to advances in the development of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), patients with HIV are living longer than ever before. And yet, even in patients on very effective, long-term ART, HIV persists, requiring patients to take antiviral medication life-long.
 
 
 New study puts forth most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasites
 
New study puts forth most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasitesA new study led by the American Museum of Natural History puts forth the most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasites to date. Known for being a devastating scourge of human health, with five species known to infect humans, there are more than 500 described species of malaria that infect mammals, birds, and reptiles. Among the researchers' findings.
 
 
 NIH commences first-in-human trial evaluating experimental treatment for Ebola
 
NIH commences first-in-human trial evaluating experimental treatment for EbolaA first-in-human trial evaluating an experimental treatment for Ebola virus disease has begun at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
 
 
 USC researchers develop new portable device for early-stage malaria detection
 
USC researchers develop new portable device for early-stage malaria detectionAccording to the World Health Organization, over 216 million people were infected with malaria in 2016, and 445,000 individuals died from the disease. The key to solving this health crisis is early-stage diagnosis when malaria therapeutics are most effective. A new prototype for a portable instrument capable early-stage malaria detection has been developed by a team of researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering.
 
 
 Zika detection breakthrough by University of Queensland
 
Zika detection breakthrough by University of QueenslandA cheap and effective tool that could save lives by helping health authorities target mosquitos infected with Zika virus has been developed by researchers from the University of Queensland and colleagues in Brazil.
 
 
 Data from past epidemic could help improve response to future Ebola outbreaks
 
Data from past epidemic could help improve response to future Ebola outbreaksData from the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak at two Sierra Leone facilities reveal daily usage rates for disinfectant and personal protective equipment, informing future outbreaks, according to a study published May 24, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michaela Mallow of International Medical Corps in Los Angeles, CA, and colleagues.