Nutrition - Honey ‘as high in sugars as table sugar
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  May 9, 2019  
  Nutrition  
  The latest nutrition news from News Medical  
 Why you should include natural sources of fiber in your dietWhy you should include natural sources of fiber in your diet
 
New research by the charity Action on Sugar suggests that consumers are being misled into believing that honey and syrups are a healthy alternative to sugar. The charity analyzed a range of sugar, honey and syrup products in an effort to highlight how much sugar they contain.
 
   Honey ‘as high in sugars as table sugar’Honey ‘as high in sugars as table sugar’
 
New research by the charity Action on Sugar suggests that consumers are being misled into believing that honey and syrups are a healthy alternative to sugar. While honey and natural syrups are less processed, contain more nutrients, and often have a better glycaemic index, they still contribute to daily sugar intake and this is not being made clear to consumers, say the charity.
 
   Supplements provide no additional health benefits, conclude researchersSupplements provide no additional health benefits, conclude researchers
 
A new study has found that using dietary supplements such as calcium and vitamin D do not prolong life expectancy, and may increase cancer risk. The study, which was published on April 9th in Annals of Internal Medicine, used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination survey from 1999 to 2010, which was linked to mortality data from the National Death Index. The sample comprised data from 30,899 US adults aged 20 years old and above.
 
 New study calls healthiness of eggs into question
 
New study calls healthiness of eggs into questionIn 2015, the government in the USA released the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which contained two contradictory statements: (1) “Cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern for overconsumption," and (2) “Individuals should eat as little dietary cholesterol as possible while consuming a healthy eating pattern”.
 
 
 Excessive vitamin D intake causes man to develop kidney failure
 
Excessive vitamin D intake causes man to develop kidney failureA case study recently published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal has highlighted the danger of taking too many vitamin D supplements. Known as the healthy "sunshine" vitamin, vitamin D is synthesized by the skin upon exposure to sunlight. However, in the case of one Canadian man, taking excessive doses vitamin D supplements proved to have disastrous health consequences that medical experts are calling a warning to consumers.
 
 
 Employee wellness programs provide little health benefits
 
Employee wellness programs provide little health benefitsA study by researchers at Harvard and the University of Chicago suggests that employee wellness programs do not actually improve health outcomes for workers or reduce the amount of money that companies’ spend on healthcare.
 
 
 Intermittent fasting shown to improve blood glucose levels
 
Intermittent fasting shown to improve blood glucose levelsA new study by researchers at the University of Adelaide has found that time-restricted eating (also known as intermittent fasting), may help to regulate blood glucose levels among people who are at risk of type 2 diabetes. Fasting was shown to improve glycemic (blood sugar) responses in men with a high risk of developing diabetes, irrespective of how much food they ate.
 
 
 Vegans are often deficient in these four nutrients
 
Vegans are often deficient in these four nutrientsSwitching from a typical Western diet to a vegan diet will inevitably mean having to replace the nutrients supplied by meat and animal products with nutrients from foods such as fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds. The increased intake of such foods can mean vegans have a higher daily intake of certain nutrients that are highly beneficial to health
 
 
 Driving to work may increase the risk of premature death by a third
 
Driving to work may increase the risk of premature death by a thirdAdults who are obese and commute by car are at a 32% increased risk of death from any cause, compared with normal-weight peers who walk or cycle to work, report researchers. The finding, which was recently presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity, was based on an analysis of more than 160,000 British individuals.
 
 
 'Don’t wash your raw chicken', warns CDC
 
'Don’t wash your raw chicken', warns CDCThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have issued another warning against washing raw chicken before cooking. They warn of the risk of spreading harmful bacteria to other food or utensils and developing food poisoning at home.