Immunology - Immune cells repair damaged gut in children with IBD
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#ALT# MSI by PCR ≠ MMR by IHC

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) detects the presence or absence of MMR proteins but won’t differentiate between functional and nonfunctional proteins. In contrast, MSI by PCR is a molecular test that determines if DNA mismatches are being repaired, making it a functional test for MMR protein activity.


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   Immune cells repair damaged gut in children with IBDImmune cells repair damaged gut in children with IBD
 
According to a new study published in the journal Gastroenterology, immune cells of a certain kind which regulate inflammatory processes and even help restore normal gut function after inflammation could be of great use to treat children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
 
   Immune cells may link body composition to how cognition changes with age, study suggestsImmune cells may link body composition to how cognition changes with age, study suggests
 
Iowa State researchers have found for the first time that less muscle and more body fat may affect our thinking as we age, and changes in parts of the immune system could be responsible.
 
 What is Immunochemotherapy?
 
What is Immunochemotherapy?In essence, immunochemotherapy refers to the treatment and management of disease by combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.
 
 
 The Circadian Rhythm and the Immune System
 
The Circadian Rhythm and the Immune SystemThe circadian rhythm has been well researched, with analysis of the relationship between the immune system and circadian rhythm.
 
 
 Common immune cell linked to failure of checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer patients
 
Common immune cell linked to failure of checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer patientsFor many lung cancer patients, the best treatment options involve checkpoint inhibitors. These drugs unleash a patient's immune system against their disease and can yield dramatic results, even in advanced cancers.
 
 
 Research shows how the hepatitis D virus copies itself
 
Research shows how the hepatitis D virus copies itselfA team of researchers has discovered how one crucial step occurs in the lifecycle of the hepatitis D virus (HDV), which causes the widespread and hard to treat liver inflammation called hepatitis D. The study, which was published recently in the Journal of Virology, could help develop antiviral therapy to control this disease.