Study shows promise for future prostate cancer treatment
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  February 7, 2019  
  Prostate Cancer  
  The latest prostate cancer news from News Medical  
 Study shows promise for future prostate cancer treatmentStudy shows promise for future prostate cancer treatment
 
A new 'seek-and-destroy' gene therapeutic system could have the potential to treat prostate cancer in the future, after it halted the majority of tumors in laboratory models at the University of Strathclyde and the Beatson Institute.
 
   PSA screening reduces prostate cancer deaths by 30%PSA screening reduces prostate cancer deaths by 30%
 
PSA-screening cuts deaths from prostate cancer by some 30%. This is shown by research based on data on 20,000 men monitored for more than two decades. The men's initially measured PSA level proved highly significant as a predictor of future cancer risk.
 
   Researchers use modified type of flu virus to develop new therapies for prostate cancerResearchers use modified type of flu virus to develop new therapies for prostate cancer
 
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have received a grant from leading men's health charity, Prostate Cancer UK, as London continues to lead the way in advanced prostate cancer research.
 
 Researchers find how GREB1 gene promotes resistance to prostate cancer treatments
 
Researchers find how GREB1 gene promotes resistance to prostate cancer treatmentsResearchers have discovered how a gene involved in regulating hormone receptors may contribute to drug resistance in some prostate cancer patients. Their findings, published in eLife, suggest that disrupting specific activity of the GREB1 gene could be explored for developing more effective therapies in future.
 
 
 Experts characterize normal electrical activity in prostate cancer cells in real time
 
Experts characterize normal electrical activity in prostate cancer cells in real timeExperts from the Universities of Bath and Seville have carried out a series of experiments with which, for the first time, they have been able to characterize the normal electrical activity in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in real time, with a resulting low-frequency electrical pattern between 0.1 and 10 Hertz.
 
 
 Rutgers study finds gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer
 
Rutgers study finds gene responsible for spread of prostate cancerA Rutgers study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer.
 
 
 Norwegian scientists discover new small molecule drug to treat prostate cancer
 
Norwegian scientists discover new small molecule drug to treat prostate cancerProfessor Fahri Saatcioglu at University of Oslo's Department of Biosciences (IBV) heads a research group investigating how androgens - male sex hormones - affect the risk of being affected by prostate cancer.