Researchers reveal how certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth
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  October 22, 2017  
  Prostate Cancer  
  The latest prostate cancer news from News Medical  
 Researchers reveal how certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growthResearchers reveal how certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth
 
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels to proliferate.
 
 
 Genetic signature within prostate cancer cells can predict metastatic tumorsGenetic signature within prostate cancer cells can predict metastatic tumors
 
Many prostate cancers, which generally are diagnosed in older men, are "indolent," slow-growing tumors that aren't destined to be fatal. But some tumors are prone to becoming aggressive and spreading beyond the prostate, making them difficult to treat and life-threatening.
 
   Use of the Livecyte® System to Characterise Heterogeneous Primary Prostate Cancer Epithelial CellsUse of the Livecyte® System to Characterise Heterogeneous Primary Prostate Cancer Epithelial Cells
 
Today, patient-derived primary cell cultures are increasingly being preferred in preclinical studies, because these cell lines not only provide a better model for tumour heterogeneity but also represent inter- and intra-patient diversity much more accurately than conventional ones.
 
 New research provides insights into role of key cancer gene
 
New research provides insights into role of key cancer geneNew research represents a promising step towards better understanding of a key cancer gene. A long-running collaboration between researchers at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, and the AstraZeneca IMED Biotech Unit reveals new insights into how the PTEN gene may control cell growth and behavior and how its loss contributes to the development and advancement of certain cancers.
 
 
 UAlberta researchers create new imaging agents to keep track of tumor growth
 
UAlberta researchers create new imaging agents to keep track of tumor growthUAlberta researchers have created two new imaging agents that could help physicians visualize the formation of tumor-associated blood vessels, keep track of tumor growth and possibly generate new therapies.