Research shows proteomics can be used to predict evolution of triple negative breast cancer
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  September 10, 2018  
  Breast Cancer  
  The latest breast cancer news from News Medical  
 Research shows proteomics can be used to predict evolution of triple negative breast cancerResearch shows proteomics can be used to predict evolution of triple negative breast cancer
 
The rarest, but also the most aggressive and hard to treat form of breast cancer, is known as triple negative. For this type of cancer, researchers have so far been unable to identify markers that can classify patients by prognosis or probability of responding to different treatments.
 
   Researchers discover potential new approach to block growth of HER2 positive breast cancerResearchers discover potential new approach to block growth of HER2 positive breast cancer
 
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an important new pathway by which HER2 positive breast cancers grow and have discovered that a dietary supplement called cyclocreatine may block the growth of HER2 positive breast cancer.
 
   Researchers discover secret communication hotline between breast cancers and normal cellsResearchers discover secret communication hotline between breast cancers and normal cells
 
Australian researchers have uncovered a secret communication hotline between breast cancers and the normal cells surrounding them. Importantly, the messages sent back and forth between the normal and tumour cells encourage the cancer to survive and to become more aggressive.
 
 Breast cancer cases among men who were at ground zero on 9/11
 
Breast cancer cases among men who were at ground zero on 9/11The after effects of the terror attacks on 11th September 2001 in the United States are still appearing. Around 15 men who were present near the Ground Zero on the fateful day have been diagnosed with rare forms of male breast cancer. Male breast cancer makes up for less than 1 percent of all breast cancers.
 
 
 USC scientists develop new way to identify molecular markers of breast cancer tumors
 
USC scientists develop new way to identify molecular markers of breast cancer tumorsA research team led by USC scientists has developed a new way to identify molecular markers of breast cancer tumors, a potentially life-saving breakthrough that could lead to better treatment for millions of women.
 
 
 Economic burden of breast cancer can continue long after diagnosis
 
Economic burden of breast cancer can continue long after diagnosisThe financial fallout from breast cancer can last years after diagnosis, particularly for those with lymphedema, a common side effect from treatment, causing cumulative and cascading economic consequences for survivors, their families, and society, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.
 
 
 Study finds new clues to understand relapse in breast cancer
 
Study finds new clues to understand relapse in breast cancerA large genomic analysis has linked certain DNA mutations to a high risk of relapse in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, while other mutations were associated with better outcomes, according to researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Baylor College of Medicine and the University of British Columbia.
 
 
 Researchers reveal an unlikely protector against growth of metastatic breast cancer
 
Researchers reveal an unlikely protector against growth of metastatic breast cancerAt the time of initial diagnosis, most patients with breast cancer show no signs that their cancer has spread elsewhere in the body. Yet, up to 30 percent of patients will ultimately experience metastasis, with breast cancer taking root and growing at other sites in the body, sometimes months, years or even decades later.
 
 
 Study: Matcha green tea kills breast cancer stem cells
 
Study: Matcha green tea kills breast cancer stem cellsMATCHA, the Green Tea packed with antioxidants, is often hailed as containing properties which prevent disease.