Malaria detection using breath analyzers
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  November 13, 2017  
  Malaria  
  The latest malaria news from News Medical  
 Malaria detection using breath analyzersMalaria detection using breath analyzers
 
Researchers are on the verge of developing a new breath test that could detect malaria. The team from Washington University in St. Louis found that malaria in blood leaves a typical “breathprint” that is unique and can be detected using a breath analyzer test.
 
 
 GHIT Fund announces US$16.7 million to support development of new drugs, vaccines and diagnosticsGHIT Fund announces US$16.7 million to support development of new drugs, vaccines and diagnostics
 
The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a unique Japanese public-private partnership formed to battle infectious diseases around the globe, today announced US$16.7 million to support development of new compounds for fighting malaria and tuberculosis, a leishmaniasis vaccine and drug, and a treatment for a long-ignored flesh-eating infection.
 
   Malaria parasites’ decision making influenced by fatty molecule in human bloodMalaria parasites’ decision making influenced by fatty molecule in human blood
 
Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team.
 
   New research disproves using anti-malaria drug for diabetes treatmentNew research disproves using anti-malaria drug for diabetes treatment
 
A drug used to treat malaria does not, after all, create new insulin-producing cells, according to a new paper from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The work, published in Cell Metabolism Nov. 2, refutes a study published in Cell in January.
 
   Neutron crystallography study could open avenues for new drugs to battle diseasesNeutron crystallography study could open avenues for new drugs to battle diseases
 
Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have performed neutron structural analysis of a vitamin B6-dependent protein, potentially opening avenues for new antibiotics and drugs to battle diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria, and diabetes.
 
 New treatment reduces disease burden in patients with rare dermatologic condition
 
New treatment reduces disease burden in patients with rare dermatologic conditionA new treatment for a rare and often incurable condition called dermatomyositis (DM) reduced the severity of the disease in patients whose DM was resistant to other therapies.
 
 
 Researchers catch killer cells red-handed in the act of microbial murder
 
Researchers catch killer cells red-handed in the act of microbial murderImmune cells called "killer cells" target bacteria invading the body's cells, but how do they do this so effectively? Bacteria can quickly evolve resistance against antibiotics, yet it seems they have not so readily been able to evade killer cells. This has caused researchers to become interested in finding out the exact mechanism that killer cells use to destroy bacterial invaders.