Improving Surgical Training & Reduce Costs with Medical Simulators

Save OR Time

In the OR, the extra time needed to train residents has a huge financial impact.1 Residents trained with virtual reality made consistently fewer errors and used 58% less surgical time.2 So, training residents using a simulator will save your organization money by decreasing the amount of OR time required for training, resulting in safer procedures, and freeing up time for experienced surgeons to carry out more procedures.

Intensify the Learning Curve

Using increasingly complex training scenarios, trainees are kept motivated. By utilizing simulators, they can access on-demand pathologies and complications without putting patients at risk, master the basics before entering the operating room, and gain more experience in less time.

After the initial investment, the VirtaMed ArthroSTM is a tremendous cost-saver. Every time a resident uses the simulator instead of cadavers or low-fidelity models, it‘s a 200-300 dollar savings for the residency program.”

James Bogener, M.D, Residency Program Director, University of Missouri – Kansas City, USA

Save OR Time

By training residents on a simulator, you will save your organization OR time. Residents will take less OR time training which will let your experienced surgeons bring in more revenue by carrying out more procedures.

1. Opportunity Cost of Lost OR Time

Missed revenue-making activities are estimated at around $20/minute (Ang 2016; Fordyce 2007). So, 205 scopes/resident/year (ACGME 2017) x 30 minutes/scope x 30% increase in procedure time x $20/minute x 50% (Rahm 2018) efficiency gain x 5 residents = $90,250 lost revenue from OR activities. $451k over five years.3

2. Cost of Additional OR Time Spent Training Residents

Hysteroscopy (Allen 2016): 20%; ACL Reconstruction (Farnworth 2001): 40%; (ACGME 2017) resident procedure volumes: 205 knee, shoulder, hip, and ankle scopes/resident/year; Variable cost of OR time (excluding fixed costs, opportunity costs, including supplies, wages, and anesthesia where needed):

$16/minute, (Childers 2018): $16; (Farnworth 2001): $15.27; Efficiency gain following VR training: 50% (Rahm 2018); 205 scopes/resident/year x 30 minutes/scope x 30% increase in procedure time x $16/minute x 50% efficiency gain = $ 14,760 /resident/year could be saved.4 So, $ 369k can be saved by utilizing the simulator for five residents over five years.

3. Five Year Warranty

The cost of a Gold Service and Support Warranty Package.

4. ArthroS with All Modules

The cost of a VirtaMed ArthroS simulator with all modules (shoulder, hip, FAST, ankle, and knee).

Intensify the Learning Curve

After training on a virtual reality simulator, residents’ skills in both knee and shoulder triangulation tasks and diagnostics improved exceptionally highly.5

Shows the percentage of the mean Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) score of the four tested tasks. A significant improvement in all four tasks was observed between the pre- to post-training in the residents.

Figure 1. Shows the percentage of the mean Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) score of the four tested tasks. A significant improvement in all four tasks was observed between the pre- to post-training in the residents.

A trainee having an afternoon on the hip will get more practice than he could achieve potentially in weeks or months of getting access within a theatre.”

Mr Tom Wainwright, Deputy Head of the Bournemouth University, Orthopaedic Research Institute

 

Resources

  1. Farnworth, L. R. et al. “A Comparison of Operative Times in Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction Between Orthopaedic Faculty and Residents: The Financial Impact of Orthopaedic Surgical Training in the Operating Room.” The Iowa Orthopaedic Journal 21 (2001): 31–35. Print.
  2. Ahlberg, G. et al. “Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Training Significantly Reduces the Error Rate for Residents During their First 10 Laparoscopic Cholecystectomies.” The American Journal of Surgery 193.6 (2007): 797-804.
  3. Ang, W. W. et al. “The Cost of Trauma Operating Theatre Inefficiency.” Annals of Medicine and Surgery 7 (2016): 24–29. PMC. Web. 23 July 2018; Fordyce, A. "Operating Theatre Efficiency Improvements using Operations Management Science." NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement 2007 (2007); ACGME. "Orthopaedic Surgery Case Logs." Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. (2017); Rahm, S. et al. "Efficacy of Standardized Training on a Virtual Reality Simulator to Advance Knee and Shoulder Arthroscopic Motor Skills." BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 19.1 (2018): 150.
  4. Allen, R. W., M. Pruitt, and K. M. Taaffe. “Effect of Resident Involvement on Operative Time and Operating Room Staffing Costs.” Journal of Surgical Education 73.6 (2016): 979-985.
  5. Rahm, S. et al. “Efficacy of Standardized Training on a Virtual Reality Simulator” (2018).
  6. Tsuda, S. et al. “Financing a Simulation Center” Surgical Clinics of North America 2015, 95(4):791-800.
  7. Tsuda, S et al. “Financing a Simulation Center” (2015); Kahol, K. “Securing Funding for Simulation Centers and Research.” The Comprehensive Textbook of Healthcare Simulation. Springer, New York, NY, 2013. 633-640; Alinier, G. & Granry, J. C. “Fundraising: A Potential Additional Source of Income for the Research and Educational Activities of a Healthcare Simulation Program”. (2015): 321-328, in Palaganas, J. Mancini, B. Maxworthy, J. Epps, C, (eds). Defining Excellence in Simulation Programs. Wolters Kluwer. ISBN 978-1451188790.

About VirtaMed

VirtaMed is a Swiss company that develops & produces highly realistic surgical simulators for medical training. Surgeons use original instruments to train in a safe environment before performing surgeries on patients.

Vision

VirtaMed's vision is to improve the quality of medical care with state-of-the-art, virtual reality based medical training and education.

Mission

Our mission is to alter the way medical skills are taught.

Values

As a company, we live innovation in a customer-oriented, agile, diverse and passionate work environment.


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Last updated: May 14, 2019 at 8:59 AM

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