Applying Different “Omic” Approaches to Labskin

The aim of this article is to demonstrate the disparity among various “Omic” methods such as genomic, lipidomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analysis, which can be used for Labskin.

Each method offers a complete and potentially versatile evaluation of numerous molecules at the same time, with high throughput.

Method

Genomic Analysis: Microarray analysis was employed to evaluate genomic variations in Labskin inoculated with S. epidermidis and S. aureus (see Figure 1).

Proteomic and Metabolomic Analysis: Xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in Labskin were characterized and quantified through MS imaging (MSI) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) (refer to Figure 2).

Lipidomic Analysis: Biomarkers related to the wound healing process were determined by performing MSI analysis on Labskin (refer to Figure 3).

Results

Genomic Analysis

Labskin gene expression response to S. epidermidis and S. aureus using a whole human genome oligo microarray (red = up-regulation, blue = unchanged, and green = drown regulation in gene expression).

Figure 1. Labskin gene expression response to S. epidermidis and S. aureus using a whole human genome oligo microarray (red = up-regulation, blue = unchanged, and green = drown regulation in gene expression).

Proteomic and Metabolomic Analysis

(A) Diagram illustrating metabolism reaction of SB-MSI probe methyl paraben with esterase to form p-hydroxybenzoic acid. (B) MSI image of Labskin treated with methyl paraben highlighting esterase activity (red = methyl paraben and green = p-hydroxybenzoic acid).

Figure 2. (A) Diagram illustrating metabolism reaction of SB-MSI probe methyl paraben with esterase to form p-hydroxybenzoic acid. (B) MSI image of Labskin treated with methyl paraben highlighting esterase activity (red = methyl paraben and green = p-hydroxybenzoic acid).

Lipidomic Analysis

Key component analysis—discriminant analysis of (A) scores plot and (B) loadings plot from MSI data representing all three regions of interest (red (dermis), yellow (wound site), and blue (epidermis)) in wounded Labskin.

Figure 3. Key component analysis—discriminant analysis of (A) scores plot and (B) loadings plot from MSI data representing all three regions of interest (red (dermis), yellow (wound site), and blue (epidermis)) in wounded Labskin.

Summary

When combined with various “Omic” technologies, Labskin produces a huge amount of information with high throughput. These methods enable each stage of the central dogma of molecular biology to be evaluated, to gain better insights into variations in the skin environment.

About Labskin

At Labskin we deliver human skin microbiology services to support your product R&D activities in the cosmetic, personal care, medical device and pharmaceutical sectors. With our sector experience and use of technology, you will be accessing industry-focused services supported by world-leading skin science expertise.

Whether you need rapid, focused analysis or flexible, tailor-made research programs we can help you develop and validate skincare ingredients and products which really work.

Our skin model is a 3D human skin equivalent that incorporates vital biological components to model normal skin function.

Developed over 12 years with more than 30 scientific journal publications, it is made from young keratinocytes (human skin cells) and adult fibroblasts (metabolically-active, collagen-producing human skin cells).

“An ideal platform for basic or applied skin research, testing compounds or formulated products for the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and chemical sectors.”


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Last updated: Apr 3, 2020 at 1:41 PM

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