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Study examines link between employment status and nonmedical use of prescription opioids

Study examines link between employment status and nonmedical use of prescription opioids

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that employment status is a factor in nonmedical use of prescription opioids and prescription stimulants. [More]
Global experts meet at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna

Global experts meet at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna

Global lung cancer researchers and patient advocates today emphasized that new models of delivering care and communicating about cancer care play an important role in the fight against lung cancer. [More]
Experimental T-cell therapy shows promise in preventing AML relapse

Experimental T-cell therapy shows promise in preventing AML relapse

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center announced promising results from an early trial in which patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia received genetically engineered immune cells. [More]
Lack of appropriate clothing can affect overall well-being of people with mobility disabilities

Lack of appropriate clothing can affect overall well-being of people with mobility disabilities

There are many important events in a person's life, including weddings, graduations, school dances and job interviews. The clothing industry has long profited from these events and the special clothing they require. [More]
Project to help those living with HIV launched by Beckman Coulter

Project to help those living with HIV launched by Beckman Coulter

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences is launching an international HIV/AIDS award at the 2016 conference for the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) being held in Cape Town, South Africa (December 3 to 8). [More]
Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

National surveys in Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Zambia reveal exceptional progress against HIV, with decreasing rates of new infection, stable numbers of people living with HIV, and more than half of all those living with HIV showing viral suppression through use of antiretroviral medication. For those on antiretroviral medication, viral suppression is close to 90 percent. [More]
Researcher to study ethical complexities of involving teens at high risk for HIV in prevention trials

Researcher to study ethical complexities of involving teens at high risk for HIV in prevention trials

An Indiana University nursing researcher has been awarded $1.1 million to study the ethical complexities of involving adolescents ages 14-17 at high risk for HIV in biomedical prevention trials. [More]
Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Researchers from the University of Liverpool's Institute of Translational Medicine have been awarded a grant of up to US$ 8.9 million (GBP £5.8m) to lead a multinational research consortium that aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. [More]
Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Boston Children's Hospital have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. [More]
New computer model provides neighborhood-level forecasts of influenza outbreaks

New computer model provides neighborhood-level forecasts of influenza outbreaks

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health developed a computer model to predict the onset, duration, and magnitude of influenza outbreaks for New York City boroughs and neighborhoods. [More]
FIRS calls on governments, health organizations to strengthen response to HIV on World AIDS Day

FIRS calls on governments, health organizations to strengthen response to HIV on World AIDS Day

In recognition of World AIDS Day, held annually on Dec. 1 each year since 1988, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is calling on governments, health advocates and non-government organizations to strengthen their response to HIV/AIDS. In 2015 AIDS claimed 1.1 million lives. [More]

WHO releases new guidelines on self-testing to improve uptake of HIV diagnosis

In advance of World AIDS Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released new guidelines on HIV self-testing to improve access to and uptake of HIV diagnosis. [More]
New guidelines recommend evaluation of osteoporosis risk for all postmenopausal women

New guidelines recommend evaluation of osteoporosis risk for all postmenopausal women

Osteoporosis is preventable and treatable, but only a small proportion of people at risk for fractures are evaluated and treated, according to new osteoporosis guidelines written by an expert panel headed by Loyola Medicine endocrinologist Pauline M. Camacho, MD, FACE. [More]
ECDC: 1 in 7 HIV-infected people in the EU/EEA unaware of disease status

ECDC: 1 in 7 HIV-infected people in the EU/EEA unaware of disease status

With 29 747 newly reported HIV infections in 2015, the EU/EEA notification rate is similar to recent years with an overall insignificant change from 6.6 per 100 000 population in 2006 to 6.3 in 2015 (adjusted for reporting delay). [More]
MGH researchers develop new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress in tumors

MGH researchers develop new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress in tumors

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress - the force exerted by solid and elastic components - within tumors, an accomplishment that may lead to improved understanding of those forces and their consequences and to novel treatment strategies. [More]
Vestibular thresholds begin to increase above age 40, new study finds

Vestibular thresholds begin to increase above age 40, new study finds

A new study led by researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear found that vestibular thresholds begin to double every 10 years above the age of 40, representing a decline in our ability to receive sensory information about motion, balance and spatial orientation. [More]
Dilon and GE receive FDA approval for Discovery NM750b breast imaging system

Dilon and GE receive FDA approval for Discovery NM750b breast imaging system

DILON Diagnostics and GE Healthcare are pleased to announce the FDA clearance of the Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) localization accessory for breast biopsy. [More]
Magnesium deficiency can cause sleep deprivation, say health experts

Magnesium deficiency can cause sleep deprivation, say health experts

Magnesium deficiency could be part of the reason you toss and turn at night, say health pioneers BetterYou following ITV’s 'Tonight – Why can’t Britain sleep?' programme which aired yesterday (17 November). [More]
Einstein researcher receives $7.5 million NIH grant to study genetics of congenital heart disease

Einstein researcher receives $7.5 million NIH grant to study genetics of congenital heart disease

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Bernice Morrow, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and collaborators at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia a five-year, $7.5 million grant to study the genetics of congenital heart abnormalities. [More]
MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. [More]
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