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Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

A study combining tumor cells from patients with breast cancer with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread and to new anti-cancer therapies. [More]
New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to UTMB is approximately $2.5 million. [More]
Barriers to sharing of public health data hinder decision-making efforts

Barriers to sharing of public health data hinder decision-making efforts

Barriers to the sharing of public health data hamper decision-making efforts on local, national and global levels, and stymie attempts to contain emerging global health threats, an international team led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health announced today. [More]
Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six faculty members at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 401 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. [More]
Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

A study conducted by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health shows that obesity costs the U.S. $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace --more than 9% of all absenteeism costs. [More]
Actions needed to prevent violence against women and girls

Actions needed to prevent violence against women and girls

Current efforts to prevent violence against women and girls are inadequate, according to a new Series published in The Lancet. Estimates suggest that globally, 1 in 3 women has experienced either physical or sexual violence from their partner, and that 7% of women will experience sexual assault by a non-partner at some point in their lives. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Residential treatment may be an appropriate first-line option for young adults who are dependent on opioid drugs - including prescription painkillers and heroin - and may result in higher levels of abstinence than does the outpatient treatment that is currently the standard of care. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
BIDMC informatrician receives Morris F. Collen Award for achievements in medical informatics

BIDMC informatrician receives Morris F. Collen Award for achievements in medical informatics

Charles Safran, MD, FACMI, Chief of the Division of Clinical Informatics at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), has received the American College of Medical Informatics' 2014 Morris F. Collen Award in recognition of his commitment to and achievements in medical informatics. [More]
Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics, Inc. today announced results for the quarter ended October 24, 2014. [More]
New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

A new method for examining the Ebola virus genome could make surveillance quicker and cheaper for West African nations, and help detect new forms of the virus. The detailed procedure is being shared with the research community along with the study paper, which is freely available in the open access journal Genome Biology. [More]
Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found. [More]
Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy increases obesity risk in children

Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy increases obesity risk in children

A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that children who were exposed to antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy had a higher risk of childhood obesity at age 7. The research also showed that for mothers who delivered their babies by a Caesarean section, whether elective or non-elective, there was a higher risk for obesity in their offspring. [More]
Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

A study led by researchers at University of Helsinki, Finland and Universities of Melbourne and South Australia has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaborative effort have been published today, 17 November 2014, in Nature Genetics. [More]
New study documents health dangers of male sex trade in Mexico City

New study documents health dangers of male sex trade in Mexico City

A new study documents the stark health dangers of the male sex trade in the streets, hotels, and discotheques of Mexico City. Lead author and health economist Omar Galárraga's point in making the grim assessment of the legal but perilous market is to find an incentive that might reduce the spread of HIV and other diseases in the nation's community of men who have sex with men. [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified what appears to be a molecular switch controlling inflammatory processes involved in conditions ranging from muscle atrophy to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Load bearing, biodegradable implants can reduce the number of second surgeries

Load bearing, biodegradable implants can reduce the number of second surgeries

No other joint in the human body is as highly mobile as is the shoulder. However, it is also very sensitive and prone to injury, with athletes being particularly affected. [More]