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Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS over the past 30 years, HIV infection rates have remained stagnant in the United States for the past decade. A study by researchers at the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute examines links between spending on social services and public health and AIDS deaths in the United States. [More]
Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

A research project headed by Henrik Kloeverpris, a postdoc at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, shows that the so-called ILCs (innate lymphoid cells) - a component of the immune system crucial to maintaining immune system balance - are destroyed in patients infected with HIV. [More]
Cistus extracts attack HIV and Ebola viruses

Cistus extracts attack HIV and Ebola viruses

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München discover that extracts of the medicinal plant Cistus incanus (Ci) prevent human immunodeficiency viruses from infecting cells. Active antiviral ingredients in the extracts inhibit docking of viral proteins to cells. Antiviral activity of Cistus extracts also targets Ebola- and Marburg viruses. [More]
Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

New research findings published in the February 2016 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that a new therapeutic strategy for HIV may already be available by repurposing an existing prescription drug. [More]
Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

It has long been thought that cancer metastasizes, or spreads, when a single cancer cell escapes from the original tumor, travels through the bloodstream and sets up shop in distant organs. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that these bad actors don't travel alone; instead they migrate through the body in cellular clusters, like gangs. [More]
People with disabilities, caregivers, veterans and healthcare professionals to attend 2016 Abilities Expo

People with disabilities, caregivers, veterans and healthcare professionals to attend 2016 Abilities Expo

Thousands of people with disabilities, their families, caregivers, seniors, wounded veterans and healthcare professionals are expected to attend Abilities Expo on February 5-7, 2016 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, West Hall A. Admission is free and the new show hours will get attendees home in time to watch the Super Bowl: Friday 11 am to 5 pm, Saturday 10 am to 6 pm and Sunday 10 am to 2 pm. [More]
MGH study may lead to first nonsurgical treatment for seborrheic keratoses

MGH study may lead to first nonsurgical treatment for seborrheic keratoses

An investigation into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the most common type of benign skin lesion may lead to the first nonsurgical treatment for the growths called seborrheic keratoses (SKs), which in addition to being cosmetically unattractive are often worrisome to patients. [More]
Proton radiotherapy as effective as standard photon therapy in treating pediatric brain tumor

Proton radiotherapy as effective as standard photon therapy in treating pediatric brain tumor

The use of proton radiotherapy to treat the most common malignant brain tumor in children is as effective as standard photon (x-ray) radiation therapy while causing fewer long-term side effects such as hearing loss and cognitive disorders, according to a study receiving online publication in Lancet Oncology. [More]
Hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss

Hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss

A recent study by Jamie Desjardins, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the speech-language pathology program at The University of Texas at El Paso, found that hearing aids improve brain function in persons with hearing loss. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Scientists demonstrate effectiveness of ART in HIV-infected infants

Scientists demonstrate effectiveness of ART in HIV-infected infants

Recent clinical trials conducted in South Africa have established that babies born with HIV should be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) as early as possible, since earlier treatment significantly decreases their mortality and morbidity rates. [More]

New robotic arm could support daily activities of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Researchers from the University of Twente's MIRA research centre, together with the VUmc, TU Delft and the Radboud umc, have developed the A-Gear: a robotic arm that can support the daily activities of people suffering the muscular disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. [More]
Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that when human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is detected in peoples' mouths, they are 22 times more likely than those without HPV-16 to develop a type of head and neck cancer. [More]
Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken in the U.S. confirms that the incidence of childhood myopia among American children has more than doubled over the last 50 years. The findings echo a troubling trend among adults and children in Asia, where 90 percent or more of the population have been diagnosed with myopia, up from 10 to 20 percent 60 years ago. [More]
Electrical stimulation could regulate, synchronize beating properties of nascent heart muscle cells

Electrical stimulation could regulate, synchronize beating properties of nascent heart muscle cells

Columbia Engineering researchers have shown, for the first time, that electrical stimulation of human heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) engineered from human stem cells aids their development and function. [More]
Combining nanomedicine with two anticancer treatments could improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients

Combining nanomedicine with two anticancer treatments could improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients

A nanoparticle drug-delivery system that combines two complementary types of anticancer treatment could improve outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer and other highly treatment-resistant tumors while decreasing toxicity. [More]
Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

The study, of over 1300 adults with high blood pressure in the Cape Town area, compared text message reminders and interactive text messaging to a control group receiving standard care. The results appear online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and the treatment of cancer, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Profectus' VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine. [More]
Mylan releases generic version of Felbatol Tablets in U.S.

Mylan releases generic version of Felbatol Tablets in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Felbamate Tablets USP, 400 mg and 600 mg, which is the generic version of Meda Pharms' Felbatol Tablets. Mylan received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for this product. [More]
Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Electronic cigarettes are widely promoted and used to help smokers quit traditional cigarettes, but a new analysis from UC San Francisco found that adult smokers who use e-cigarettes are actually 28 percent less likely to stop smoking cigarettes. [More]
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