Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm News and Research RSS Feed - Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm News and Research

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (also known as AAA, pronounced "triple-a") is a localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta exceeding the normal diameter by more than 50 percent. It is caused by degeneration of the aortic wall, but the exact etiology remains unknown.
ESC Guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases published in European Heart Journal

ESC Guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases published in European Heart Journal

The first comprehensive ESC Guidelines on aortic diseases are published today. They are presented at ESC Congress 2014 by Task Force Chairpersons Professor Raimund Erbel (Germany) and Professor Victor Aboyans (France). [More]
Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Bulges in body's major blood vessel can cause potentially lethal ruptures, blood clots. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition: If the body's major blood vessel ruptures, it can prove deadly. [More]
Study: Minimally invasive aortic repair procedure safer for patients

Study: Minimally invasive aortic repair procedure safer for patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have documented the safety benefits of aortic stent grafts inserted during minimally invasive surgery to repair abdominal aortic aneurysms - weaknesses in the body's largest artery that can rupture, causing potentially lethal internal bleeding. [More]

Lombard Medical exhibits Aorfix system at Critical Issues in Aortic Endografting symposium

Lombard Medical, Inc, a medical device company focused on Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), exhibited its Aorfix Endovascular stent graft system at the 18th international experts' symposium, Critical Issues in Aortic Endografting, in Malmö, Sweden on June 27-28, 2014. [More]

Lombard Medical showcases Aorfix Endovascular Stent Graft at SVS Annual Meeting

Lombard Medical, Inc., a medical device company focused on Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), showcased its Aorfix Endovascular Stent Graft at the 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery Annual Meeting in Boston, June 5-7. [More]
Blood pressure has heterogeneous associations with cardiovascular diseases

Blood pressure has heterogeneous associations with cardiovascular diseases

The associations between blood pressure and cardiovascular disease are variable, reveals a large study that highlights the impact of angina and heart failure. [More]
Systolic, diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases

Systolic, diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases

Raised systolic and diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases and at different ages, according to new research involving 1.25 million patients from primary care practices in England published in a special themed issue of The Lancet. [More]

Analysts forecast Global Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Devices market to grow at CAGR of 10.67%

The analysts forecast the Global Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Devices market to grow at a CAGR of 10.67 percent over the period 201-2016. One of the key factors contributing to this market growth is the high prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms. [More]
Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]
Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage is criticized for many things — justly and unjustly — but not heart disease, according to findings of a recent study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country - believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed - found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed. [More]
New AAA screening program reduces number of undiagnosed at-risk men by more than 50%

New AAA screening program reduces number of undiagnosed at-risk men by more than 50%

A screening program for abdominal aortic aneurysms, integrated into an electronic health record, dramatically reduced the number of unscreened at-risk men by more than 50 percent within 15 months, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of Vascular Surgery. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a balloon-like bulge in the aorta, which - if ruptured - can result in death. [More]
Gore receives Shonin approval from Japan to market GORE C3 Delivery System

Gore receives Shonin approval from Japan to market GORE C3 Delivery System

W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. has received Shonin approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to market the GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis featuring C3 Delivery System as a minimally invasive treatment for patients suffering from an abdominal aortic aneurysm. [More]
Study: Nearly one in five older adults end up in emergency department after surgery

Study: Nearly one in five older adults end up in emergency department after surgery

Nearly one in five older adults who have common operations will end up in the emergency department within a month of their hospital stay, a new study finds - a surprisingly high number found in the first national look at the issue. [More]
Study to test ability of doxycycline dose to reduce growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms

Study to test ability of doxycycline dose to reduce growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms

A new clinical study at the University of Michigan Health System will test the ability of a once daily dose of doxycycline to reduce the growth of small abdominal aortic aneurysms. [More]
Personalized models for preventive health care services

Personalized models for preventive health care services

With physicians facing increasing demands on their time, it can be extremely difficult to prioritize which preventive care methods should be used for their patients. Now, two researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed a mathematical model that will save time, lead to enhanced care, and potentially save lives. [More]
ACS NSQIP hospitals have consistently better surgical outcomes, new study finds

ACS NSQIP hospitals have consistently better surgical outcomes, new study finds

A new study evaluating surgical outcomes at California hospitals enrolled in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program found surgical patients at ACS NSQIP hospitals had significantly reduced mortality rates compared with non-ACS NSQIP hospitals. [More]
Report shows low baseline DBP associated with brain atrophy in patients with arterial disease

Report shows low baseline DBP associated with brain atrophy in patients with arterial disease

Low baseline diastolic blood pressure appears to be associated with brain atrophy in patients with arterial disease, whenever declining levels of blood pressure over time among patients who had a higher baseline BP were associated with less progression of atrophy, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Neurology, a JAMA Network publication. [More]
Mayo Clinic research shows that revascularization has reduced need for amputations by 40%

Mayo Clinic research shows that revascularization has reduced need for amputations by 40%

Peripheral arterial disease is a common circulation problem in which reduced blood flow can lead to complications that jeopardize the limbs, possibly even requiring amputation. Procedures known as revascularization have reduced the need for amputations 40 percent over two decades, Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Handheld ultrasound devices: an interview with Warren Ortmann, Signostics

Handheld ultrasound devices: an interview with Warren Ortmann, Signostics

Ultrasound devices use sound waves to image the organs of the body safely, without the use of radiation. The sound waves are produced by applying a current to a piezoelectric crystal housed in a transducer. The crystal alters shape and creates a sound wave. [More]