Abdominal Pain News and Research RSS Feed - Abdominal Pain News and Research

Abdominal pain is traditionally described by its chronicity (acute or chronic), its progression over time, its nature (sharp, dull, colicky), its distribution (by various methods, such as abdominal quadrant (left upper quadrant, left lower quadrant, right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant) or other methods that divide the abdomen into nine sections), and by characterization of the factors that make it worse, or alleviate it.
Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

A new study may explain why people who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy nevertheless experience a variety of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms after ingesting wheat and related cereals. [More]
OMT techniques can help decrease acute pain in postpartum women

OMT techniques can help decrease acute pain in postpartum women

Preliminary results demonstrate that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) helps reduce acute pain in postpartum women, regardless of whether they delivered vaginally or via cesarean. [More]
Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today. [More]
Low-FODMAP rye bread may reduce symptoms of IBS

Low-FODMAP rye bread may reduce symptoms of IBS

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are often concerned that certain foods may trigger or worsen their symptoms, which can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, or constipation. In a new study, patients who ate rye bread that was low in so-called "FODMAPs" (fermentable oligo- di- and mono-saccharides and polyols) experienced milder IBS symptoms than patients who ate normal rye bread. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vaxchora, a vaccine for the prevention of cholera caused by serogroup O1 in adults 18 through 64 years of age traveling to cholera-affected areas. Vaxchora is the only FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of cholera. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
Tarantula venom could help provide relief for patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Tarantula venom could help provide relief for patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Researchers from The University of Adelaide in South Australia found that a specific peptide in the spider venom could be used to understand how people sense pain. [More]
Spider venom helps investigate pain signals experienced by irritable bowel syndrome patients

Spider venom helps investigate pain signals experienced by irritable bowel syndrome patients

Spiders have helped researchers from Australia and the US discover a new target for irritable bowel syndrome pain. [More]
Duke scientists discover new small-molecule drugs to treat chronic pain

Duke scientists discover new small-molecule drugs to treat chronic pain

A research team at Duke University has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously block two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain. [More]
Ocaliva drug gets FDA approval for primary biliary cholangitis treatment

Ocaliva drug gets FDA approval for primary biliary cholangitis treatment

On Friday, May 27, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval for Ocaliva (obeticholic acid) for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in adults with an inadequate response to UDCA, or as a single therapy in adults unable to tolerate UDCA. [More]
Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

A child feels nauseated all the time, but no medical test can find what is wrong. Or a child vomits regularly, but there's no illness or eating disorder to explain it. These, and other stomach and bowel-related problems with no obvious causes, are called functional gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
ART trial: Adacolumn shows clinical benefit in refractory ulcerative colitis patients

ART trial: Adacolumn shows clinical benefit in refractory ulcerative colitis patients

Data from the 48-week ART trial, presented today at the Digestive Disease Week meeting, showed that remission and response rates were 37.2% and 53.2% respectively at week 12, in patients with moderate-to-severe, steroid-dependent active ulcerative colitis (UC) with insufficient response or intolerance to immunosuppressants and / or biologics when treated with between five and eight sessions with Adacolumn. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

A change in diet can improve the lives of those diagnosed with a common, but hard-to-treat gut disorder. [More]
Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Hospitalization for rotavirus infections decreased by > 70% following the introduction of a vaccine program in Ontario, Canada, according to a study published May 11, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Wilson from Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Canada, and colleagues. [More]
Genetic variations that prevent beneficial gut bacteria from working may lead to Crohn's disease

Genetic variations that prevent beneficial gut bacteria from working may lead to Crohn's disease

A major type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be caused in part by genetic variants that prevent beneficial bacteria in the gut from doing their job, according to a new study published today in the journal Science. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
First generic version of Crestor gets FDA approval

First generic version of Crestor gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first generic version of Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium) tablets. [More]
Advertisement