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The pain-reliever acetaminophen (also known as paracetomol) is one of the best-selling over-the-counter medications, used by more than 200 million Americans a year. It is sold under many brand names, including Tylenol, and is an ingredient in nearly 200 medications, both over-the-counter (such as Excedrin, Midol, NyQuil, and Sudafed) and prescription (such as Vicodin).
Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

As the accuracy, reliability, adoption, and successful use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) continue to increase, the ultimate goal of combining CGM with an insulin pump and sophisticated algorithms for automating the control and suspension of insulin infusion--known as the "artificial pancreas"--moves closer to becoming a reality. [More]
Natural dietary supplement Arthrem significantly reduces pain and stiffness in osteoarthritis patients

Natural dietary supplement Arthrem significantly reduces pain and stiffness in osteoarthritis patients

New Zealand company Promisia Integrative Limited, announced today significant positive results from a clinical trial on their natural dietary supplement Arthrem. The results have been published in the December 2015 issue of Clinical Rheumatology, a prestigious international peer reviewed medical journal. [More]
Drug use remains stable among teens, MTF survey shows

Drug use remains stable among teens, MTF survey shows

The 2015 Monitoring the Future survey (MTF) shows decreasing use of a number of substances, including cigarettes, alcohol, prescription opioid pain relievers, and synthetic cannabinoids ("synthetic marijuana"). Other drug use remains stable, including marijuana, with continued high rates of daily use reported among 12th graders, and ongoing declines in perception of its harms. [More]
Paracetamol provides no benefits in fighting influenza virus

Paracetamol provides no benefits in fighting influenza virus

Some doctors may recommend that patients with the flu take acetaminophen, or paracetemol, to relieve their symptoms; however, a new randomized clinical trial found no benefits to the over-the-counter medication in terms of fighting the influenza virus or reducing patients' temperature or other symptoms. [More]
Acetaminophen Awareness Coalition issues safety message to consumers about flu medicines

Acetaminophen Awareness Coalition issues safety message to consumers about flu medicines

With cold and flu season around the corner, consumers will soon begin to purchase medicines such as cough syrup, throat lozenges, and nasal sprays to help get relief from symptoms such as fever, coughs, congestion, and more. Many of the medicines used to treat these cold and flu symptoms can contain common drug ingredients such as acetaminophen. [More]
Scientists partner to create liver-on-chip device that mimics human physiology

Scientists partner to create liver-on-chip device that mimics human physiology

Safety evaluation is a critical part of drug and cosmetic development. In recent years there is a growing understanding that animal experiments fail to predict the human response, necessitating the development of alternative models to predict drug toxicity. [More]
New research could help reverse side effects of acetaminophen overdose

New research could help reverse side effects of acetaminophen overdose

New research could help reverse deadly side effects caused by excessive doses of the drug acetaminophen, the major ingredient in Tylenol and many other over-the-counter and prescription medicines. [More]
BioDelivery Sciences calls for new treatment options for opioid addiction

BioDelivery Sciences calls for new treatment options for opioid addiction

As the rate of opioid abuse soars to new levels, growing recognition of the problem is garnering unprecedented media attention—as well as motivating innovative new approaches to better treatment. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Researchers from the Children's Hospital at Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine will present data from more than 50 studies that explore topics including obesity, asthma and autism at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies. [More]
Female liver cells become more susceptible to adverse effects of drugs, study finds

Female liver cells become more susceptible to adverse effects of drugs, study finds

Female liver cells, and in particular those in menopaused women, are more susceptible to adverse effects of drugs than their male counterparts, according to new research carried out by the JRC. It is well known that women are more vulnerable when it comes to drug-induced liver effects, but it's the first time it has been shown that there are differences at cellular level. [More]
ACA calls for 'conservative care first' approach to low-back pain

ACA calls for 'conservative care first' approach to low-back pain

The American Chiropractic Association, in response to recent research calling into question the efficacy of acetaminophen in the management of spinal pain, strongly encourages patients and healthcare providers to consider the benefits of a conservative approach to back pain. [More]
Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Earaches in babies are not uncommon. But a baby's inability to communicate symptoms can leave most parents feeling helpless. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, three-fourths of babies will get at least one ear infection before the age of one. [More]
Stepped-care strategy improves function, decreases pain severity in veterans

Stepped-care strategy improves function, decreases pain severity in veterans

Although U.S. military veterans who have returned from Iraq or Afghanistan are more likely to suffer chronic pain than veterans of any other conflict in American history, little headway has been made in helping them manage the often debilitating effects of chronic pain. [More]
OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

Drug-induced acute liver failure is uncommon, and over-the-counter medications and dietary and herbal supplements -- not prescription drugs -- are its most common causes, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Cumberland initiates clinical development of Boxaban (ifetroban) oral capsule for AERD treatment

Cumberland initiates clinical development of Boxaban (ifetroban) oral capsule for AERD treatment

Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced an expansion of its pipeline with a new Phase II development program. The Company has initiated the clinical development of Boxaban (ifetroban) oral capsule for the treatment of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). [More]
New findings could pave way to develop drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases

New findings could pave way to develop drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases

Strokes, heart attacks and traumatic brain injuries are separate diseases with certain shared pathologies that achieve a common end - cell death and human injury due to hypoxia, or lack of oxygen. [More]
Oatmeal breakfast results in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories intake at lunch

Oatmeal breakfast results in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories intake at lunch

A new study suggests that your breakfast cereal choice may affect how full you feel and how much you eat for lunch, especially if you're overweight. According to new research published in the latest issue of the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, scientists found that having oatmeal (Quaker Oats Quick 1-minute™) for breakfast resulted in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories eaten at the next meal compared to a calorie-matched breakfast of a ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) - sugared corn flakes. [More]
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]
AHS provides updated assessment of treatments for acute migraine

AHS provides updated assessment of treatments for acute migraine

The January issue of the American Headache Society journal Headache provides an updated assessment of the best treatments to use when a migraine attack occurs. The assessment will form the basis of new AHS treatment guidelines. [More]
Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Each year more than 12 million Americans visit their doctors complaining of headaches, which result in lost productivity and costs of upward of $31 billion annually. A new study by researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests some of that cost could be offset by physicians ordering fewer tests and an increased focus on counseling about lifestyle changes. [More]
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