Acetaminophen News and Research RSS Feed - Acetaminophen News and Research

The pain-reliever acetaminophen (also known as paracetomol) is one of the best-selling over-the-counter medications, used by more than 200 million Americans a year. It is sold under many brand names, including Tylenol, and is an ingredient in nearly 200 medications, both over-the-counter (such as Excedrin, Midol, NyQuil, and Sudafed) and prescription (such as Vicodin).
Nurse-driven protocols can shorten length of stay for patients in emergency department

Nurse-driven protocols can shorten length of stay for patients in emergency department

Protocols allowing nurses to administer certain types of treatment in the emergency department can dramatically shorten length of stay for patients with fever, chest pain, hip fractures and vaginal bleeding during pregnancy, according to the results of a study published earlier this month in Annals of Emergency Medicine. [More]
Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows

Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows

WIn a study of children with mild, persistent asthma, scientists found that acetaminophen was tolerated without the worsening of asthma, when compared with ibuprofen use. [More]
Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells

Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells

Neuropathic pain - which affects more than 1 million Americans - could be reduced or even eliminated by targeting brain cells that are supposed to provide immunity but, in some instances, do the opposite, causing chronic pain that could last a lifetime. [More]
Chemists develop faster, cheaper method to quantify water content in solid pharmaceutical drugs

Chemists develop faster, cheaper method to quantify water content in solid pharmaceutical drugs

Chemists at The University of Texas at Arlington have invented a method to quantify water content in solid pharmaceutical drugs that is faster, cheaper, more accurate and more precise than Karl Fischer titration, the method currently recognized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and widely used worldwide. [More]
Dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus infections can be potential health threat to travelers

Dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus infections can be potential health threat to travelers

As the eyes of the world turn to Rio de Janiero for the 2016 Summer Olympics, the spread of the Zika virus in Brazil is a growing concern — but Zika is not the only disease that mosquitoes can spread to humans. [More]
Opioid funding bill should address greater access to balanced pain management

Opioid funding bill should address greater access to balanced pain management

The Alliance for Balanced Pain Management (AfBPM) made the following statement on the Obama administration’s plan to curb the opioid addiction crisis, which was released this morning as Congress prepares to tackle funding for related programs. [More]
Safety tips to prevent injuries from fireworks during summer

Safety tips to prevent injuries from fireworks during summer

Fireworks can result in severe burns, scars and disfigurement that can last a lifetime. [More]
Paracetamol use during pregnancy linked to hyperactivity, autism spectrum symptoms in children

Paracetamol use during pregnancy linked to hyperactivity, autism spectrum symptoms in children

A new study has found that paracetamol (acetaminophen), which is used extensively during pregnancy, has a strong association with autism spectrum symptoms in boys and for both genders in relation to attention-related and hyperactivity symptoms. [More]
Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

The natural molecule, n-acetylcysteine (NAC), with strong antioxidant effects, shows potential benefit as part of the management for patients with Parkinson's disease, according to a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Enzyme previously thought beneficial could pose threat to developing embryos

Enzyme previously thought beneficial could pose threat to developing embryos

A pair of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have discovered that an enzyme previously thought only to be beneficial could, in fact, pose significant danger to developing embryos. The new research could have implications not only for prenatal development but also for treating lymphedema and liver damage resulting from acetaminophen overdose. [More]
New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

"My child has a fever of 101. Should I be concerned?" Through a new skill created for Amazon Alexa-enabled devices, parents will now be able to ask Alexa a variety of questions around fever and other common symptoms. The KidsMD Alexa skill was developed by the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator team at Boston Children's Hospital and launched today. [More]
New U of T study shows that acetaminophen could impede error-detection in the brain

New U of T study shows that acetaminophen could impede error-detection in the brain

It's been known for more than a century that acetaminophen is an effective painkiller, but according to a new U of T study it could also be impeding error-detection in the brain. [More]
Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

More patients hospitalized with acute liver failure - often the result of acetaminophen overdose - are surviving, including those who receive a liver transplant and those who don't, an analysis led by a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher showed. [More]
Research suggests ibuprofen does not increase bleeding risk after plastic surgery

Research suggests ibuprofen does not increase bleeding risk after plastic surgery

Patients are often instructed not to take ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before or after surgery because of increased bleeding risk. But available evidence suggests that ibuprofen does not increase the risk of bleeding after plastic surgery procedures, according to a research review in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

According to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, medications and treatments long considered safe to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be. [More]
Tips to treat boils and styes at home

Tips to treat boils and styes at home

It may be tempting to squeeze or pop a painful lump on your skin, but experts advise against it. The bump could be a boil - a pus-filled skin infection that occurs around a hair follicle or oil gland - or a stye if the lump is on your eyelid. According to dermatologists, squeezing a boil or stye could make the infection worse. [More]
Pregnant women with acute migraine more likely to experience adverse birth outcomes

Pregnant women with acute migraine more likely to experience adverse birth outcomes

Women who have acute migraine attacks that are severe enough to prompt them to seek care may be more likely to have complications when giving birth, including preterm delivery, preeclampsia and low birthweight. Women 35 and older were seven times more likely to have these complications. [More]
Promising therapeutic strategy for relieving neuropathic pain

Promising therapeutic strategy for relieving neuropathic pain

A specific molecule involved in maintaining pain after a nerve injury has been identified and blocked in mice by Hiroshima University researchers. These results reveal a promising therapeutic strategy for treating neuropathic pain. [More]
American Pain Society releases new post-surgical pain management guideline

American Pain Society releases new post-surgical pain management guideline

The American Pain Society has released a new evidence-based clinical practice guideline, appearing in The Journal of Pain, with 32 recommendations to help clinicians achieve optimal pain management following surgery. According to numerous studies, the majority of surgical patients receive inadequate pain relief, which can heighten the risk for prolonged post-surgical pain, mood disorders and physical impairment. [More]
Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

As the accuracy, reliability, adoption, and successful use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) continue to increase, the ultimate goal of combining CGM with an insulin pump and sophisticated algorithms for automating the control and suspension of insulin infusion--known as the "artificial pancreas"--moves closer to becoming a reality. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement