Acetylation News and Research RSS Feed - Acetylation News and Research

Acetylation (or in IUPAC nomenclature ethanoylation) describes a reaction that introduces an acetyl functional group into an organic compound. Deacetylation is the removal of the acetyl group.
Study: Obesity causes changes in colon that may lead to colorectal cancer

Study: Obesity causes changes in colon that may lead to colorectal cancer

Obesity, rather than diet, causes changes in the colon that may lead to colorectal cancer, according to a study in mice by the National Institutes of Health. The finding bolsters the recommendation that calorie control and frequent exercise are not only key to a healthy lifestyle, but a strategy to lower the risk for colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. [More]
HDAC2 inhibitor could improve post-traumatic stress disorder treatment: Study

HDAC2 inhibitor could improve post-traumatic stress disorder treatment: Study

Nearly 8 million Americans suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder, a condition marked by severe anxiety stemming from a traumatic event such as a battle or violent attack. [More]
Mitochondrial enzyme SIRT5 regulates proteins involved in metabolism

Mitochondrial enzyme SIRT5 regulates proteins involved in metabolism

The Sirtuin family of protein deacylases has received considerable attention in recent years due to its links to longevity, diabetes, cancer, and metabolic regulation. [More]
Acetylon Pharmaceuticals presents positive interim data from two ricolinostat clinical trials at ASH 2013

Acetylon Pharmaceuticals presents positive interim data from two ricolinostat clinical trials at ASH 2013

Acetylon Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the leader in the development of selective histone deacetylase inhibitors for enhanced therapeutic outcomes, today announced that positive interim clinical data from the two proof-of-concept clinical trials with selective HDAC6 inhibitor, ricolinostat (ACY-1215), were presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology in New Orleans, LA. [More]
Gladstone-led study sheds light on critical molecular process

Gladstone-led study sheds light on critical molecular process

One of biology's most fundamental processes is something called transcription. It is just one step of many required to build proteins-and without it life would not exist. However, many aspects of transcription remain shrouded in mystery. But now, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes are shedding light on key aspects of transcription, and in so doing are coming even closer to understanding the importance of this process in the growth and development of cells-as well as what happens when this process goes awry. [More]
Study opens doors to novel treatments for aggressive brain cancer

Study opens doors to novel treatments for aggressive brain cancer

Ludwig researchers have elucidated a key mechanism by which cancer cells change how they metabolize glucose to generate the energy and raw materials required to sustain runaway growth. [More]
Study shows enhancer RNA molecules may open new avenues for gene therapy

Study shows enhancer RNA molecules may open new avenues for gene therapy

A study investigating the function of the recently discovered enhancer RNA molecules may open new avenues for gene therapy. According to the study researchers, altering the production and function of these molecules could affect the expression of genes and, in consequence, possibly also the progression of various diseases. [More]
Researchers find vital enzyme complex that gets elevated in many cancers

Researchers find vital enzyme complex that gets elevated in many cancers

A team of researchers from Philadelphia and Norway has determined the structure of an enzyme complex that modifies one end of most human proteins and is made at elevated levels in numerous forms of cancer. A study in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, led by researchers at The Wistar Institute, depicts the structure and the means of action of a protein complex called NatA. [More]

New type of chemical modification affects proteins, could provide insights into causes of cancer

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new type of chemical modification that affects numerous proteins within mammalian cells. The modification appears to work as a regulator of important cellular processes including the metabolism of glucose. [More]
Scientists discover molecular switch that determines death or survival of cell

Scientists discover molecular switch that determines death or survival of cell

The study is the result of a collaboration of scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, University of Michigan, and University of California San Diego, USA, who were interested in finding out whether autophagy can be affected by events in the cell nucleus. Surprisingly, they discovered that a signal chain in the nucleus serves as a kind of molecular switch that determines whether the cell dies or survives. [More]

TSRI scientists identify key triggers of cancer-blocking mechanism in cells

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified key triggers of an important cancer-blocking mechanism in cells. [More]
Study provides comprehensive blueprint for understanding diabetes

Study provides comprehensive blueprint for understanding diabetes

Australian scientists have charted the path of insulin action in cells in precise detail like never before. This provides a comprehensive blueprint for understanding what goes wrong in diabetes. [More]
Researchers examine how BRD4 contributes to sustained presence of NF-kappa B in cancer cells

Researchers examine how BRD4 contributes to sustained presence of NF-kappa B in cancer cells

In a new study described in the journal Oncogene, researchers reveal how a key player in cell growth, immunity and the inflammatory response can be transformed into a primary contributor to tumor growth. [More]

New hope for patients with chronic HBV infection

Exciting new data presented today at the International Liver Congress- 2013 include rults from early in vitro and in vivo studies targeting covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), which may form the basis of a cure for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. [More]
Studies identify cellular pathways involved in governing day-night pattern of circadian rhythms

Studies identify cellular pathways involved in governing day-night pattern of circadian rhythms

UC Irvine-led studies have revealed the cellular mechanism by which circadian rhythms - also known as the body clock - modify energy metabolism and also have identified novel compounds that control this action. The findings point to potential treatments for disorders triggered by circadian rhythm dysfunction, ranging from insomnia and obesity to diabetes and cancer. [More]

GeneTex to introduce new Histone H3 antibody

GeneTex, a leading manufacturer of antibodies and antibody-related reagents, is set to launch a new antibody against phosphorylated Histone H3. [More]

Novel Cornelia de Lange syndrome gene discovered

Scientists have discovered that mutations in the histone deacetylase 8 gene can cause the rare genetic disorder known as Cornelia de Lange syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability, limb deformity, and other disabilities resulting from problems in early development. [More]

Researchers identify new gene in Cornelia deLange syndrome

Genetics researchers have identified a key gene that, when mutated, causes the rare multisystem disorder Cornelia deLange syndrome (CdLS). By revealing how mutations in the HDAC8 gene disrupt the biology of proteins that control both gene expression and cell division, the research sheds light on this disease, which causes intellectual disability, limb deformations and other disabilities resulting from impairments in early development. [More]

HDAC8 gene mutations cause Cornelia deLange syndrome

Genetics researchers have identified a key gene that, when mutated, causes the rare multisystem disorder Cornelia deLange syndrome (CdLS). By revealing how mutations in the HDAC8 gene disrupt the biology of proteins that control both gene expression and cell division, the research sheds light on this disease, which causes intellectual disability, limb deformations and other disabilities resulting from impairments in early development. [More]
New research sheds light on pluripotency

New research sheds light on pluripotency

New research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem sheds light on pluripotency-the ability of embryonic stem cells to renew themselves indefinitely and to differentiate into all types of mature cells. [More]