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Bruker Launches BioScope Resolve™ at the Sixth AFM BioMed Conference

Bruker Launches BioScope Resolve™ at the Sixth AFM BioMed Conference

Bruker unveiled the BioScope Resolve™, a biological atomic force microscope (bioAFM), at the sixth AFM BioMed Conference. The BioScope Resolve™ features excellent resolution imaging and comprehensive cell mechanics capabilities, and can be used with an inverted optical microscope (IOM). [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.3 million grant to find ways to erase traumatic memories

TSRI scientists awarded $2.3 million grant to find ways to erase traumatic memories

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.3 million from the Department of Health and Human Services of the National Institutes of Health to better understand how memories are stored in the hopes of eventually being able to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by erasing traumatic memories without altering other, more benign ones. [More]
Rice University researchers model dynamic instability of microtubules

Rice University researchers model dynamic instability of microtubules

New computer models that show how microtubules age are the first to match experimental results and help explain the dynamic processes behind an essential component of every living cell, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Aquila-Histoplex, a contract research organisation specialised in histological and multiplex staining technologies, was today announced as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe by Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. (ACD), a technology and market leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools. [More]
Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

medwireNews: Autoantibodies to endothelin receptor type A and angiotensin receptor type-1 predict the development of, and mortality from, systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, research suggests. [More]
UMass Amherst cell biologists propose new detailed cytokinesis model

UMass Amherst cell biologists propose new detailed cytokinesis model

Along with copying and splitting DNA during division, cells must have a way to break safely into two viable daughter cells, a process called cytokinesis. But the molecular basis of how plant cells accomplish this without mistakes has been unclear for many years. [More]
Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

The majority of drugs used to treat asthma today are the same ones that were used 50 years ago. New drugs are urgently needed to treat this chronic respiratory disease, which causes nearly 25 million people in the United States alone to wheeze, cough, and find it difficult at best to take a deep breath. [More]
Immature blood vessels linked to poor sunitinib response

Immature blood vessels linked to poor sunitinib response

Patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with relatively mature blood vessels respond better to sunitinib and have fewer metastatic sites than those with immature vessels, a study has found. [More]
Artificial cells to devour undesirables: an interview with Dr. Takanari Inoue

Artificial cells to devour undesirables: an interview with Dr. Takanari Inoue

If junk is not removed, pathological conditions can develop. For example, in one condition, the neutrophil count significantly decreases. Neutrophils remove pathogens and people with a reduced neutrophil count are more prone to infection, especially to rare bacteria that wouldn’t cause infection under normal conditions. [More]
Researchers find roving detection system for treating cancer, Parkinson's disease and ALS

Researchers find roving detection system for treating cancer, Parkinson's disease and ALS

Duke University researchers have found a "roving detection system" on the surface of cells that may point to new ways of treating diseases like cancer, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Scientists identify long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis

Scientists identify long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis

Scientists at the Interfaculty Institute of Biochemistry (IFIB) have collaborated with colleagues from the Department of Pharmacy and the Department of Dermatology of the University of Tübingen to identify a long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis. [More]
Schizophrenia-linked genetic variations and the developing brain: an interview with Prof. Guo-li Ming

Schizophrenia-linked genetic variations and the developing brain: an interview with Prof. Guo-li Ming

How much is currently known about what happens in the developing brain that puts people at risk of schizophrenia? [More]
Scientists show for the first time how structures inside cells are regulated

Scientists show for the first time how structures inside cells are regulated

New research from scientists at the University of Kent has shown for the first time how the structures inside cells are regulated - a breakthrough that could have a major impact on cancer therapy development. [More]
Sciatic nerve injury can cause differential expression of microRNAs in dorsal root ganglia

Sciatic nerve injury can cause differential expression of microRNAs in dorsal root ganglia

Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3 contains a Rho GAP domain that regulates the activities of Rho family GTPases and affects actin polymerization, which influences dendrite elaboration, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, contributing to neural regeneration. [More]
New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have created a way to develop personalized gene therapies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a leading cause of vision loss. [More]
Researchers discover signaling pathway in cancer cells that invades nearby tissues

Researchers discover signaling pathway in cancer cells that invades nearby tissues

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered a signaling pathway in cancer cells that controls their ability to invade nearby tissues in a finely orchestrated manner. [More]
New fluorescent molecule paves way for easier and higher quality imaging of cells

New fluorescent molecule paves way for easier and higher quality imaging of cells

Like our own bodies, cells have their own skeletons called 'cytoskeletons' and are made of proteins instead of bones. [More]
GSA announce winners of GSA Poster Awards at 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

GSA announce winners of GSA Poster Awards at 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) and the Drosophila research community are pleased to announce the winners of GSA Poster Awards at the 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, which took place in San Diego, March 26-30, 2014. [More]
Researcher to recieve 2014 EMBO Gold Medal at FEBS-EMBO Meeting

Researcher to recieve 2014 EMBO Gold Medal at FEBS-EMBO Meeting

EMBO today announced Sophie Martin of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, as the winner of the 2014 EMBO Gold Medal. The award acknowledges her work to understand the molecular events that define the organization and development of the cell. [More]
Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. It also enables cancer cells to break free from their sites of origin and migrate throughout the body. [More]