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Understanding nucleation process could be critical for treating Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes

Understanding nucleation process could be critical for treating Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes

Whether it is clouds or champagne bubbles forming, or the early onset of Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes, a common mechanism is at work: nucleation processes. [More]
Study reveals potential therapeutic targets for treating patients who carry IFNGR receptor mutation

Study reveals potential therapeutic targets for treating patients who carry IFNGR receptor mutation

The study began by taking the medical history of 11 children, all of whom had a disorder due to mycobacteria infections, as the basis. All were discovered to have the same phenotype with the same mutation, which was located in the interferon-gamma (IFNGR) receptor, so the group began to explore what was causing this dysfunction. [More]
Breakthrough research links sphingolipid-mediated cell junctions and tumorigenesis

Breakthrough research links sphingolipid-mediated cell junctions and tumorigenesis

Almost all cell types exhibit some sort of polarity, which enables them to carry out specialized functions. Adherens junctions, which consist of the transmembrane protein cadherin and the intracellular components beta-catenin, alpha-catenin, and actin filaments, initiate cell-cell contacts and maintenance of cell polarity. [More]
Japanese researchers discover causative gene for common type of hearing loss

Japanese researchers discover causative gene for common type of hearing loss

A causative gene for a highly common type of hearing loss (sensorineural hearing loss, or SNHL) has been identified by a group of Japanese researchers, who successfully replicated the condition using a transgenic mouse. [More]
Researchers use Thai water bug to find clues for heart muscle diseases

Researchers use Thai water bug to find clues for heart muscle diseases

What can a Thai water bug teach us about our muscles, especially the heart? A lot, says Professor of Biological Science Kenneth Taylor. New research by Taylor published today in Science Advances gives scientists better insight into how the heart muscle works and how sometimes it fails. [More]
Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

My research lab studies several classes of systems. We are mostly interested in looking at large protein assemblies to understand their structure, dynamics and how their properties relate to their malfunction in disease. [More]
Mathematical model explains molecular events linked to learning and memory formation

Mathematical model explains molecular events linked to learning and memory formation

A team of researchers has built a mathematical model that describes the molecular events associated with the beginning stage of learning and memory formation in the human brain. [More]
NIPS researchers reveal new mechanisms by which microglia sculpt neural circuits

NIPS researchers reveal new mechanisms by which microglia sculpt neural circuits

Microglia are cells that combat various brain diseases and injuries by swallowing foreign or disruptive objects and releasing molecules that activate repair mechanisms. [More]
New test holds potential to revolutionise diagnosis of childhood leukaemia

New test holds potential to revolutionise diagnosis of childhood leukaemia

Researchers at The University of Manchester have unlocked the potential of a new test which could revolutionise the way doctors diagnose and monitor a common childhood leukaemia. [More]
Embryonic stem cell gene Nanog holds potential for reversing effects of aging

Embryonic stem cell gene Nanog holds potential for reversing effects of aging

The fountain of youth may reside in an embryonic stem cell gene named Nanog. [More]
Researchers discover new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers discover new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have identified a new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease. In experiments using fruit flies, blocking the pathway reduced the death of brain cells, suggesting that interfering with the pathway could represent a promising new strategy to treat the disease in human patients. [More]
Researchers study how skin stem cells respond to forces

Researchers study how skin stem cells respond to forces

All cells share the same genetic code, no matter if they are skin or brain cells. However, these cells are exposed to very different types of mechanical environments and mechanical stresses. [More]
Researchers aim to explore impact of gender and aging on CapZ levels in the heart

Researchers aim to explore impact of gender and aging on CapZ levels in the heart

Why do women have lower rates of heart failure than men for most of their lives? University of Guelph researchers have uncovered a possible clue - an actin binding protein called "CapZ" that also protects against heart attacks. [More]
Lack of Alix protein leads to occurrence of hydrocephalus in the brain

Lack of Alix protein leads to occurrence of hydrocephalus in the brain

A team led by researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital report that mice lacking the protein Alix develop hydrocephalus or "water on the brain." Alix ensures that epithelial cells of the choroid plexus are oriented correctly with respect to one another to prevent compromise of the epithelial barrier. [More]
Researchers identify new myosin kinase that could optimize heart contractions

Researchers identify new myosin kinase that could optimize heart contractions

The heart is the only muscle that contracts and relaxes continuously over a lifetime to pump oxygen-rich blood to the body's organs. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center now have identified a previously unrecognized enzyme that could optimize contraction and lead to new strategies to treat heart failure. [More]
Motor protein Myo1c uses actin cytoskeleton as 'track' for Neph1 transport

Motor protein Myo1c uses actin cytoskeleton as 'track' for Neph1 transport

The motor protein Myo1c binds to Neph1, a protein crucial for ensuring effective filtration by the kidney, and serves as one mode of its cellular transport, according to findings by investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and their collaborators reported in the May 16, 2016 issue of Molecular and Cellular Biology. [More]
General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

Anesthesia is used every day, but surprisingly little is known about one of its most dangerous side effects--depressed heart function. [More]
Study shows over-expression of adhesion molecules in fat tissues protects mice from obesity, diabetes

Study shows over-expression of adhesion molecules in fat tissues protects mice from obesity, diabetes

Okayama University researchers report that the overexpression of an adhesion molecule found on the surface of fat cells appears to protect mice from developing obesity and diabetes. The findings, published in the journal Diabetes, March 2016, may fuel the development of new therapies targeting these diseases. [More]
Scientists develop new technology that helps visualize translation of mRNA into proteins

Scientists develop new technology that helps visualize translation of mRNA into proteins

For the first time, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have developed a technology allowing them to "see" single molecules of messenger RNA as they are translated into proteins in living mammalian cells. Initial findings using this technology that may shed light on neurological diseases as well as cancer were published online today in Science. [More]
Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Researchers at UMass Medical School have identified a new molecular pathway critical for maintaining the smooth muscle tone that allows the passage of materials through the digestive system. [More]
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