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Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Pathogenic bacteria develop killer machines that work very specifically and highly efficiently. Scientists from the University of Freiburg have solved the molecular mechanism of a fish toxin that could be used in the future as a medication to treat cancer. The scientists have now published their research in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Findings shed light on how symmetrical, round cells become polarized and directional

Findings shed light on how symmetrical, round cells become polarized and directional

When Greek mythology and cell biology meet, you get the protein Callipygian, recently discovered and named by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University for its role in determining which area of a cell becomes the back as it begins to move. [More]
Research shows how prion-like proteins critical for maintaining long-term memories

Research shows how prion-like proteins critical for maintaining long-term memories

Research from Eric Kandel's lab at Columbia University Medical Center has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time. And paradoxically, it works in the same way as mechanisms that cause mad cow disease, kuru, and other degenerative brain diseases. [More]
Researchers map physical properties of live breast cancer cells using advanced AFM technology

Researchers map physical properties of live breast cancer cells using advanced AFM technology

Researchers who developed a high-speed form of atomic force microscopy have shown how to image the physical properties of live breast cancer cells, for the first time revealing details about how deactivation of a key protein may lead to metastasis. [More]
Researchers discover initiation process of dendritic spines

Researchers discover initiation process of dendritic spines

Researchers from the University of Helsinki, ETH Zürich, Aix-Marseille and the German Mouse Clinic teamed up to investigate the initiation process of dendritic spines. They discovered that protein called MIM bends the plasma membrane to aid the formation of dendritic spines from the surface of the neuronal dendrite. [More]
UB researchers identify mechanisms behind some autistic behaviors, suggest potential targets

UB researchers identify mechanisms behind some autistic behaviors, suggest potential targets

Scientists at the University at Buffalo have identified the mechanisms behind a genetic mutation that produces certain autistic behaviors in mice, as well as therapeutic strategies to restore normal behaviors. [More]
Vanderbilt biologists explore how electrochemical connections form at molecular and cellular level

Vanderbilt biologists explore how electrochemical connections form at molecular and cellular level

Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. [More]
Mexican researcher close to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease

Mexican researcher close to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease, which took world fame after being diagnosed in various personalities such as actor Michael J. Fox, the heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali and the painter Salvador Dalí, could be very close to a cure, thanks to a Mexican researcher which managed to eliminate its neurological effects with an immunosuppressant. [More]
Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

An enzyme that facilitates modification of proteins via a glucose metabolism pathway may promote cell proliferation in the lung tissue of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
Researchers develop new method for preventing destructive activity of osteoclasts

Researchers develop new method for preventing destructive activity of osteoclasts

Most existing treatments for pathological bone loss inhibit osteoclasts (bone-destroying cells) to limit bone degradation. However, by doing this, they also prevent bone formation since it is stimulated by the presence of these very same osteoclast cells. Researchers from the CNRS, Inserm and the Université de Montpellier and Université Jean Monnet - Saint-étienne have developed a new approach for preventing the destructive activity of osteoclasts without affecting their viability. [More]
Study reveals how low levels of profilin 1 protein in breast tumours invade other tissues

Study reveals how low levels of profilin 1 protein in breast tumours invade other tissues

A new study led by José Javier Bravo-Cordero, Spanish researcher at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, details how cells with low levels of the profilin 1 protein in breast tumours increase their capacity to metastasise and invade other tissues. [More]
UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

Two research teams based at the University of Chicago have received prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health to develop novel medications to treat sleep apnea and asthma. [More]

Bruker Launches BioScope Resolve™ at the Sixth AFM BioMed Conference

Bruker unveiled the BioScope Resolve™, a biological atomic force microscope (bioAFM), at the sixth AFM BioMed Conference. The BioScope Resolve™ features excellent resolution imaging and comprehensive cell mechanics capabilities, and can be used with an inverted optical microscope (IOM). [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.3 million grant to find ways to erase traumatic memories

TSRI scientists awarded $2.3 million grant to find ways to erase traumatic memories

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.3 million from the Department of Health and Human Services of the National Institutes of Health to better understand how memories are stored in the hopes of eventually being able to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by erasing traumatic memories without altering other, more benign ones. [More]

Rice University researchers model dynamic instability of microtubules

New computer models that show how microtubules age are the first to match experimental results and help explain the dynamic processes behind an essential component of every living cell, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Aquila-Histoplex, a contract research organisation specialised in histological and multiplex staining technologies, was today announced as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe by Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. (ACD), a technology and market leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools. [More]
Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

medwireNews: Autoantibodies to endothelin receptor type A and angiotensin receptor type-1 predict the development of, and mortality from, systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, research suggests. [More]
UMass Amherst cell biologists propose new detailed cytokinesis model

UMass Amherst cell biologists propose new detailed cytokinesis model

Along with copying and splitting DNA during division, cells must have a way to break safely into two viable daughter cells, a process called cytokinesis. But the molecular basis of how plant cells accomplish this without mistakes has been unclear for many years. [More]
Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

The majority of drugs used to treat asthma today are the same ones that were used 50 years ago. New drugs are urgently needed to treat this chronic respiratory disease, which causes nearly 25 million people in the United States alone to wheeze, cough, and find it difficult at best to take a deep breath. [More]
Immature blood vessels linked to poor sunitinib response

Immature blood vessels linked to poor sunitinib response

Patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with relatively mature blood vessels respond better to sunitinib and have fewer metastatic sites than those with immature vessels, a study has found. [More]
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