Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells, the cells in the body that normally fight infections. There are two main types of white blood cells-lymphoid cells and myeloid cells. ALL affects lymphoid cells.

Leukemia cells are abnormal cells that cannot do what normal blood cells do. The abnormal cells are immature white blood cells that cannot help the body fight infections. For this reason, children with ALL often get infections and have fevers.

ALL is also called acute lymphocytic leukemia. It is the most common leukemia in children.
NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

It is estimated that more than 72,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHL) in 2016. The sixth leading cancer diagnosis in U.S. men and women, NHL has more than 30 sub-types, each featuring unique treatment choices and challenges. [More]
Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Twenty-seven of 29 patients with an advanced type of leukemia that had proved resistant to multiple other forms of therapy went into remission after their T cells (disease-fighting immune cells) were genetically engineered to fight their cancers. [More]
Study identifies risk factors for asparaginase-induced pancreatitis in ALL patients

Study identifies risk factors for asparaginase-induced pancreatitis in ALL patients

Researchers have identified a rare genetic variation associated with a dramatically increased risk of severe acute pancreatitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients treated with the chemotherapy agent asparaginase. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital led the study, which appears today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
High doses of commonly-used chemotherapy drug may increase survival rate of ALL patients

High doses of commonly-used chemotherapy drug may increase survival rate of ALL patients

With a cure rate approaching 90 percent, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - the most common type of childhood cancer - is often hailed as one of the "success stories" of modern cancer treatment. But up to 20 percent of patients with a high risk of relapse are not cured. That could change with the results from a clinical trial co-led by investigators from NYU Langone Medical Center, which shows giving high doses of a commonly-used chemotherapy drug increases the survival rate for these patients. [More]
CCCBD offers promising new investigational therapy to treat childhood ALL

CCCBD offers promising new investigational therapy to treat childhood ALL

The Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is one of the first sites in the world to offer a promising new investigational therapy to treat pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
Researchers find Achilles' heel of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers find Achilles' heel of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have found the Achilles' heel of one of the most aggressive forms of leukemia that affects both children and adults. They have also identified a possible new treatment that exploits this fatal weakness. [More]
Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

A potential correlation between pre-labor cesarean delivery (PLCD) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could offer new targets for cancer prevention research, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. [More]
Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Cancer immunology is based upon boosting the body's own immune system to vanquish malignancies. It is among the fastest growing areas of oncology research. Researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center have launched three clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of a novel cellular-immunotherapy that uses modified T cells - one of the immune system's primary weapons - to treat three different types of blood cancer that often defy existing therapies. [More]
Researchers Pinpoint Potential Enzyme For T-Cell Leukemia Treatment

Researchers Pinpoint Potential Enzyme For T-Cell Leukemia Treatment

For the first time, researchers at Boston University have shown that T-cell leukemia cells use a particular cycle, called the TCA or Kreb cycle, to support their growth and survival. [More]
Research findings identify potential genetics-guided precision medicine for leukemia patients

Research findings identify potential genetics-guided precision medicine for leukemia patients

An international research team has determined how inherited gene variations lead to severe drug toxicity that may threaten chances for a cure in children with leukemia. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, results of which set the stage to expand the use of a patient's genetic make-up to tailor chemotherapy. [More]
Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous. [More]
Pediatric ALL patients treated with chemotherapy alone at risk for neurocognitive deficits

Pediatric ALL patients treated with chemotherapy alone at risk for neurocognitive deficits

Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients treated with chemotherapy alone remain at risk for attention and learning problems that persist after treatment ends, according to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators. [More]
Abnormal breakage of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers aggressive form of ALL

Abnormal breakage of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers aggressive form of ALL

A research team led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has discovered details of how the abnormal breakage and rearrangement of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers a particularly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Such leukemias are cancers of white blood cells, in which genetic mutations trigger overproduction of immature cells, called lymphoblasts. [More]
Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found that significant bone loss - a side effect of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - occurs during the first month of treatment, far earlier than previously assumed. Results of the study will be available online February 4, in advance of publication in the journal Bone. [More]
Personalised approach may help identify patients’ response to certain cancer treatments

Personalised approach may help identify patients’ response to certain cancer treatments

Many people in Russia know about the Dima Rogachev Centre - particularly those who have faced the challenge of child cancer. [More]
Researchers discover novel way to enhance, restore cancer suppressor activity in B-ALL

Researchers discover novel way to enhance, restore cancer suppressor activity in B-ALL

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, working with Chinese and American colleagues, have discovered a novel way to enhance and restore cancer suppressor activity in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, resulting in better outcomes in a pre-clinical model of the disease. The finding could pave the way for a new class of drugs for this and other forms of leukemia. [More]
Marqibo now available to leukemia patients through myTomorrows' Internet-based platform

Marqibo now available to leukemia patients through myTomorrows' Internet-based platform

myTomorrows (Amsterdam, the Netherlands), announced today that it has started a collaboration with Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Henderson, USA) to provide access to its liposome-encapsulated vincristine for treatment of Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia. [More]
Pediatric chemotherapy regimen improves outcomes in young adults with ALL

Pediatric chemotherapy regimen improves outcomes in young adults with ALL

Using a pediatric chemotherapy regimen to treat young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) significantly improved their outcomes compared to what has historically been achieved with 'adult' treatment protocols, report Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists. [More]
Amgen’s Phase 2 data supports safety, efficacy of BLINCYTO in ALL patients with minimal residual disease

Amgen’s Phase 2 data supports safety, efficacy of BLINCYTO in ALL patients with minimal residual disease

Amgen today announced that new data from three Phase 2 trials support the efficacy and safety of BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
New approaches to treating leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma

New approaches to treating leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma

New, highly targeted treatment approaches for leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma to be presented today at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition represent a tremendous expansion of oral and intravenous therapy options for patients with blood cancers. [More]
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