Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells, the cells in the body that normally fight infections. There are two main types of white blood cells-lymphoid cells and myeloid cells. ALL affects lymphoid cells.

Leukemia cells are abnormal cells that cannot do what normal blood cells do. The abnormal cells are immature white blood cells that cannot help the body fight infections. For this reason, children with ALL often get infections and have fevers.

ALL is also called acute lymphocytic leukemia. It is the most common leukemia in children.
Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Physician-scientists are crucial to moving scientific discoveries from the lab to patients, but their numbers have been dwindling just when they are needed most, particularly in cancer research, as the number of cancer cases is projected to increase by 45 percent in the next fifteen years and elevate cancer to the leading cause of death in America. [More]
Xencor announces progress and expansion of proprietary pipeline of XmAb antibodies

Xencor announces progress and expansion of proprietary pipeline of XmAb antibodies

Xencor, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing engineered monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergic diseases, and cancer, today announced updates on its lead product candidates, XmAb®5871 and XmAb®7195, and on its XmAb® bispecific oncology pipeline. [More]
Researchers track down key gene mutation responsible for causing acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers track down key gene mutation responsible for causing acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Two medical researchers from the Children's Hospital of Michigan and the Wayne State University School of Medicine have published the results of a nearly 10-year investigation that identified a key gene mutation that can trigger acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL, and several other types of cancer. [More]
Researchers identify potential treatment option for childhood leukemia

Researchers identify potential treatment option for childhood leukemia

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center are reporting a potentially important discovery in the battle against one of the most devastating forms of leukemia that accounts for as many as one in five children with a particularly aggressive form of the disease relapsing within a decade. [More]
US cancer physicians explore new approach to help older patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant

US cancer physicians explore new approach to help older patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant

When stem cell transplant first became part of standard treatment for certain cancers and blood diseases twenty years ago, individuals older than 60 were rarely considered for the procedure. [More]
Researchers report new way to treat T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers report new way to treat T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center are reporting a potentially important discovery in the battle against one of the most devastating forms of leukemia that accounts for as many as one in five children with a particularly aggressive form of the disease relapsing within a decade. [More]
Novartis CTL019 CAR T cell therapy demonstrates potential to treat B-cell lymphomas

Novartis CTL019 CAR T cell therapy demonstrates potential to treat B-cell lymphomas

Novartis is highlighting data from an ongoing Phase II clinical study of CTL019, an investigational chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, that indicate its potential in the treatment of specific types of hard-to-treat non-Hodgkin lymphoma. [More]
Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present data from multiple Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection, BLINCYTO (blinatumomab), oprozomib and Nplate (romiplostim)‎ studies at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association taking place in Vienna, June 11 - 14, 2015. [More]
Researchers submit patent application for drug that could destroy acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers submit patent application for drug that could destroy acute lymphoblastic leukemia

A patent application for a drug that could destroy the deadly childhood disease known as acute lymphoblastic leukemia — and potentially other cancers as well — has been submitted by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Maryland and the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors - especially those whose treatment included brain irradiation or chemotherapy with glucocorticoids - are 14 percent more likely to be obese than their healthy peers. [More]
Dana-Farber/Boston Children's joins immunotherapy clinical trial for children with ALL

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's joins immunotherapy clinical trial for children with ALL

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center has joined a clinical trial of immunotherapy for children with relapsed or treatment-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Led by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the trial is one of several nationally that are evaluating cancer immunotherapy, a treatment approach -- hailed by Science magazine as their Breakthrough of the Year in 2013 -- that triggers a patient's immune system to attack his or her cancer cells. [More]
T cell expansion technology: an interview with Alexander Malykhin, CVPF, University of Pennsylvania

T cell expansion technology: an interview with Alexander Malykhin, CVPF, University of Pennsylvania

T cells are taken from the patient’s blood and then modified using lentivirus, adenovirus or RNA electroporation. The modifications allow us to reprogram T cells to recognize cancer cells. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism responsible for steroid resistance in leukemia patients

Researchers identify mechanism responsible for steroid resistance in leukemia patients

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Penn professor to be recognized with AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology

Penn professor to be recognized with AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology

The American Association for Cancer Research and the Cancer Research Institute will recognize Carl H. June, MD, the Richard W. Vague professor in immunotherapy at the Perelman School of Medicine and director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, with the third annual AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
Radiation resistance in leukemia can be overcome by using new precision medicine, say researchers

Radiation resistance in leukemia can be overcome by using new precision medicine, say researchers

A team of researchers led by Fatih M. Uckun, MD, PhD, of The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Professor at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine has determined that radiation resistance in leukemia can be overcome by using an engineered protein they recently designed and developed as a new precision medicine against leukemia. [More]
MRD-directed therapy helps boost survival of young leukemia patients

MRD-directed therapy helps boost survival of young leukemia patients

Measuring the concentration of leukemia cells in patient bone marrow during the first 46 days of chemotherapy should help boost survival of young leukemia patients by better matching patients with the right intensity of chemotherapy. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators led the research, which appears in the March 20 edition of the journal Lancet Oncology. [More]
Scientists discover how ALL cells mutate to survive chemotherapy

Scientists discover how ALL cells mutate to survive chemotherapy

By genomic sequencing of leukemia cells from relapsed patients at different stages, scientists have discovered key details of how acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells mutate to survive chemotherapy. These mutations enable the cells to proliferate, causing relapse and often death. [More]
New immunotoxin found to be safe, effective in patients with B-cell malignancies

New immunotoxin found to be safe, effective in patients with B-cell malignancies

Almost all patients with a group of blood cancers called B-cell malignancies have two prominent "fingerprints" on the surface of leukemia and lymphoma cancers, called CD22 and CD19, Vallera explained. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
Rare, aggressive subtype of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia has surprisingly few mutations

Rare, aggressive subtype of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia has surprisingly few mutations

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital--Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project reports that a highly aggressive form of leukemia in infants has surprisingly few mutations beyond the chromosomal rearrangement that affects the MLL gene. The findings suggest that targeting the alteration is likely the key to improved survival. [More]
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