Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells, the cells in the body that normally fight infections. There are two main types of white blood cells-lymphoid cells and myeloid cells. ALL affects lymphoid cells.

Leukemia cells are abnormal cells that cannot do what normal blood cells do. The abnormal cells are immature white blood cells that cannot help the body fight infections. For this reason, children with ALL often get infections and have fevers.

ALL is also called acute lymphocytic leukemia. It is the most common leukemia in children.
Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous. [More]
Pediatric ALL patients treated with chemotherapy alone at risk for neurocognitive deficits

Pediatric ALL patients treated with chemotherapy alone at risk for neurocognitive deficits

Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients treated with chemotherapy alone remain at risk for attention and learning problems that persist after treatment ends, according to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators. [More]
Abnormal breakage of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers aggressive form of ALL

Abnormal breakage of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers aggressive form of ALL

A research team led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has discovered details of how the abnormal breakage and rearrangement of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers a particularly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Such leukemias are cancers of white blood cells, in which genetic mutations trigger overproduction of immature cells, called lymphoblasts. [More]
Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found that significant bone loss - a side effect of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - occurs during the first month of treatment, far earlier than previously assumed. Results of the study will be available online February 4, in advance of publication in the journal Bone. [More]
Personalised approach may help identify patients’ response to certain cancer treatments

Personalised approach may help identify patients’ response to certain cancer treatments

Many people in Russia know about the Dima Rogachev Centre - particularly those who have faced the challenge of child cancer. [More]
Researchers discover novel way to enhance, restore cancer suppressor activity in B-ALL

Researchers discover novel way to enhance, restore cancer suppressor activity in B-ALL

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, working with Chinese and American colleagues, have discovered a novel way to enhance and restore cancer suppressor activity in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, resulting in better outcomes in a pre-clinical model of the disease. The finding could pave the way for a new class of drugs for this and other forms of leukemia. [More]
Marqibo now available to leukemia patients through myTomorrows' Internet-based platform

Marqibo now available to leukemia patients through myTomorrows' Internet-based platform

myTomorrows (Amsterdam, the Netherlands), announced today that it has started a collaboration with Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Henderson, USA) to provide access to its liposome-encapsulated vincristine for treatment of Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia. [More]
Pediatric chemotherapy regimen improves outcomes in young adults with ALL

Pediatric chemotherapy regimen improves outcomes in young adults with ALL

Using a pediatric chemotherapy regimen to treat young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) significantly improved their outcomes compared to what has historically been achieved with 'adult' treatment protocols, report Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists. [More]
Amgen’s Phase 2 data supports safety, efficacy of BLINCYTO in ALL patients with minimal residual disease

Amgen’s Phase 2 data supports safety, efficacy of BLINCYTO in ALL patients with minimal residual disease

Amgen today announced that new data from three Phase 2 trials support the efficacy and safety of BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
New approaches to treating leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma

New approaches to treating leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma

New, highly targeted treatment approaches for leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma to be presented today at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition represent a tremendous expansion of oral and intravenous therapy options for patients with blood cancers. [More]
Prophylactic antibiotics reduce risk of serious bacterial infections in children with ALL

Prophylactic antibiotics reduce risk of serious bacterial infections in children with ALL

Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in children during the critical first month of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer, according to a U.S. and Canadian study led by investigators from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. [More]
Research reveals genetic variants linked to treatment-related complications in children with blood diseases

Research reveals genetic variants linked to treatment-related complications in children with blood diseases

Research to be presented today at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition reveals genetic variants that are associated with disease severity and treatment-related complications in children with blood diseases. [More]
Genetic variations associated with increased risk for osteonecrosis in young ALL patients

Genetic variations associated with increased risk for osteonecrosis in young ALL patients

Variations in genes involved in normal bone development are associated with an 8- to 15-fold increased risk for osteonecrosis in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Children's Oncology Group investigators. [More]
INP achieves 80% survival rate in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

INP achieves 80% survival rate in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

The National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico, has achieved 80 percent survival rate in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a major oncological illness that affects children. [More]
Researchers identify inherited gene variation associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers identify inherited gene variation associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers studying two generations of a family affected by pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have identified an inherited variation in the ETV6 gene that is associated with an increased risk of developing the disease. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators led the study, which appears in the October 28 issue of the journal Lancet Oncology. [More]
Study suggests potential new way to block cancer-causing gene

Study suggests potential new way to block cancer-causing gene

A new study suggests a potential new way to block one of the most common cancer-causing genes, without causing severe side effects. [More]
Orange pigment may have potential as anti-cancer drug

Orange pigment may have potential as anti-cancer drug

An orange pigment found in lichens and rhubarb called parietin may have potential as an anti-cancer drug, scientists at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have discovered. [More]
Computer-based cognitive training improves attention, memory in childhood cancer survivors

Computer-based cognitive training improves attention, memory in childhood cancer survivors

Intensive, adaptive computer-based cognitive training presented as a video game helped improve working memory and other cognitive skills of childhood cancer survivors and holds hope for revolutionizing management of the late effects of cancer treatment. [More]
Amgen gets positive CHMP opinions for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) and BLINCYTO (blinatumomab)

Amgen gets positive CHMP opinions for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) and BLINCYTO (blinatumomab)

"We are pleased to receive positive CHMP opinions for Kyprolis and BLINCYTO as this is an important step in providing new treatment options for patients in Europe with rare forms of cancer," said Sean E. Harper, M.D., executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. [More]
Amgen, Xencor partner to develop and commercialize new therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, inflammation

Amgen, Xencor partner to develop and commercialize new therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, inflammation

Amgen and Xencor, Inc. announced today that the two companies have entered into a research and license agreement to develop and commercialize novel therapeutics in the areas of cancer immunotherapy and inflammation. [More]
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