Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News and Research

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells, the cells in the body that normally fight infections. There are two main types of white blood cells-lymphoid cells and myeloid cells. ALL affects lymphoid cells.

Leukemia cells are abnormal cells that cannot do what normal blood cells do. The abnormal cells are immature white blood cells that cannot help the body fight infections. For this reason, children with ALL often get infections and have fevers.

ALL is also called acute lymphocytic leukemia. It is the most common leukemia in children.
Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Skatchewan is a vast prairie province in the middle of Canada. It's home to hockey great Gordie Howe and the world's first curling museum. But Canadians know it for another reason: it's the birthplace of the country's single-payer health-care system. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug designation to ERYTECH’s lead product for AML treatment

FDA grants orphan drug designation to ERYTECH’s lead product for AML treatment

ERYTECH Pharma, a French biopharmaceutical company that develops innovative treatments for acute leukemia and other oncology indications with unmet medical needs, announces that its lead product GRASPA®/ERY-ASP has been granted Orphan Drug Designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), an aggressive form of blood cancer. [More]

Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists have moved a step closer to being able to preserve fertility in young boys who undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer. The new research, published in Fertility and Sterility, the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, addresses the safety of an option scientists are developing for boys who aren't sexually mature and cannot bank sperm. [More]
Researchers examine mothers’ condition during maintenance period after child's treatment for ALL

Researchers examine mothers’ condition during maintenance period after child's treatment for ALL

"It's a whole new cancer world" and "I don't remember what it's like to have sleep" were the most common themes of mothers interviewed by University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers during the maintenance period after a child's treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
UCLA develops experimental treatment that eliminates acute type of leukemia in mice

UCLA develops experimental treatment that eliminates acute type of leukemia in mice

A diverse team of scientists from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has developed an experimental treatment that eradicates an acute type of leukemia in mice without any detectable toxic side effects. [More]
UCLA scientists developed experimental treatment that eradicates acute type of leukemia in mice

UCLA scientists developed experimental treatment that eradicates acute type of leukemia in mice

A diverse team of scientists from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed an experimental treatment that eradicates an acute type of leukemia in mice without any detectable toxic side effects. The drug works by blocking two important metabolic pathways that the leukemia cells need to grow and spread. [More]

Novel two-pronged strategy targeting DNA synthesis treats leukemia in mice

A novel two-pronged strategy targeting DNA synthesis can treat leukemia in mice, according to a study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Cell therapy: A powerful treatment for cancer patients

Cell therapy: A powerful treatment for cancer patients

Investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have reported more encouraging news about one of the most exciting methods of cancer treatment today. The largest clinical study ever conducted to date of patients with advanced leukemia found that 88 percent achieved complete remissions after being treated with genetically modified versions of their own immune cells. [More]

Cogstate technology to be applied in paediatric clinical trial in the U.S.

Medical technology company Cogstate Limited has today announced its technology will be used in a large paediatric clinical trial in the United States. [More]
ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' Iclusig now commercially available to patients in the U.S.

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' Iclusig now commercially available to patients in the U.S.

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the commercial availability of Iclusig (ponatinib) for adult patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia-chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the United States. ARIAD has begun shipping Iclusig to Biologics, Inc., its exclusive specialty pharmacy, which is now filling prescriptions from physicians and distributing the cancer medicine to patients. [More]
Scientists discover genetic signature mechanism in immune system as driving force for childhood leukaemia

Scientists discover genetic signature mechanism in immune system as driving force for childhood leukaemia

Scientists have discovered a genetic signature that implicates a key mechanism in the immune system as a driving force for a type of childhood leukaemia. [More]
Antipsychotic medication can actively combat cells of difficult-to-treat form of ALL

Antipsychotic medication can actively combat cells of difficult-to-treat form of ALL

In a prime example of finding new uses for older drugs, studies in zebrafish show that a 50-year-old antipsychotic medication called perphenazine can actively combat the cells of a difficult-to-treat form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The drug works by turning on a cancer-suppressing enzyme called PP2A and causing malignant tumor cells to self-destruct. [More]
Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy grants nearly $25M to conduct cancer related gene therapy research

Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy grants nearly $25M to conduct cancer related gene therapy research

As the potential of gene and cell therapy in fighting cancers grows and oncologists across the nation explore the burgeoning science, doctors have uncovered a stunning development – cancers can be treated using patients' own cells as a weapon, and can eliminate the harrowing, often debilitating effects of chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. [More]

Researchers discover completely new targets for treatment of blood cancers

A particularly aggressive form of leukemia is the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It is especially common among children and very difficult to treat. Researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have now discovered completely new targets for the treatment of blood cancers. [More]
Study shows children with ALL can safely receive intravenous infusions of chemotherapy

Study shows children with ALL can safely receive intravenous infusions of chemotherapy

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of pediatric cancer, can safely receive intravenous infusions of a reformulated mainstay of chemotherapy that has been delivered via painful intramuscular injection for more than 40 years, research suggests. [More]
CAR therapy shows potential for advancing treatment of patients with ALL and CLL

CAR therapy shows potential for advancing treatment of patients with ALL and CLL

Novartis is highlighting new research from members of the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine on the investigational chimeric antigen receptor therapy, CTL019. Several studies being presented at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting add to the scientific understanding of CTL019 in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia and build on earlier research findings. [More]
Children and adults with high-risk ALL benefit from novel, personalized cell therapy

Children and adults with high-risk ALL benefit from novel, personalized cell therapy

Nearly 90 percent of children and adults with a highly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed no evidence of cancer after receiving a novel, personalized cell therapy that reprograms a patient's immune system. In pilot studies of bioengineered T cells that attack leukemia, 24 of 27 patients (89%) experienced complete responses within 28 days after treatment. In all, 27 patients received the treatment--22 children treated at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and five adults treated at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Novartis to present updates on broad cancer portfolio at ASH and SABCS symposiums

Novartis to present updates on broad cancer portfolio at ASH and SABCS symposiums

Novartis will present updates on its broad cancer portfolio with more than 240 abstracts at the upcoming American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting and CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS). [More]
Young adults who had childhood cancer more likely to be frail than their peers

Young adults who had childhood cancer more likely to be frail than their peers

Young adults who survived childhood cancer are more likely than their peers to be frail, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study, which reported the condition is more common among female survivors than women decades older. The research appears in the November 18 online edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]

Kiadis reports successful Phase II enrollment for CR-AIR-007 ATIR blood cancer treatment study

Kiadis Pharma B.V., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing treatments for blood cancers, today announces the successful Phase II enrollment of approximately ten patients of whom the majority have already been transplanted and received ATIR™. Kiadis Pharma's lead program, ATIR™, is a cell-based product designed to enable stem cell transplantations from partially mismatched (haploidentical) family donors for blood cancer patients who do not have a standard of care stem cell donor available. Topline data from the trial (CR-AIR-007) is expected in the first half of 2014. [More]