Addiction News and Research RSS Feed - Addiction News and Research

New drug target could help prevent opioid tolerance and addiction

New drug target could help prevent opioid tolerance and addiction

Researchers have identified a brain mechanism that could be a drug target to help prevent tolerance and addiction to opioid pain medication, such as morphine, according to a study by Georgia State University and Emory University. [More]
New study aims to find how genes that influence brain function cause risk for drug addiction

New study aims to find how genes that influence brain function cause risk for drug addiction

A new study aims to better understand what makes some individuals particularly vulnerable to developing drug addiction. A team of researchers from across the country will look at how genes that influence brain function cause risk for addictions. [More]
Smokers who switch to vaping may have fewer respiratory infections, study reveals

Smokers who switch to vaping may have fewer respiratory infections, study reveals

The majority of smokers who successfully switch to vaping say they have fewer respiratory infections, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

An international team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found strong evidence supporting a new strategy against drug addiction. [More]
Study examines mental illness severity among Asian populations living in western country

Study examines mental illness severity among Asian populations living in western country

Chinese and South Asian patients in Ontario experience more severe mental illness at the time of hospital admission than other patients, according to a new study that examined the association between illness severity and ethnicity. [More]
Study finds disparities in mental health care for minority children and young adults

Study finds disparities in mental health care for minority children and young adults

Black children and young adults are about half as likely as their white counterparts to get mental health care despite having similar rates of mental health problems, according to a study published today [Friday, Aug. 12] in the International Journal of Health Services. [More]
Glia cells may play role in regulating sugar intake into the brain, experts report

Glia cells may play role in regulating sugar intake into the brain, experts report

Researchers at Technical University of Munich discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process. [More]
Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

There's a reason it's called a gut feeling. The brain and the gut are connected by intricate neural networks that signal hunger and satiety, love and fear, even safety and danger. These networks employ myriad chemical signals that include dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter most famous for its role in reward and addiction. [More]

Intervention Drug Rehab Association provides dual diagnosis programs to increase recovery rates

Addiction and mental illness are closely related. According to the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 8.4 million American adults have a mental illness as well as an addiction. [More]
New research examines link between alcohol use and unprotected sex among young women

New research examines link between alcohol use and unprotected sex among young women

It may come as little surprise that alcohol use is widespread among young adults. In the U.S., 70 percent of adults aged 18 to 24 drink alcohol, with 40 percent of women imbibing over the recommended daily limit of 3 drinks per day. [More]
New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction

New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, suggests that increased levels of a molecule in the brain, called hypocretin, may contribute to cocaine addiction. [More]
Study finds racial-ethnic disparities in emergency department opioid prescription for pain-related conditions

Study finds racial-ethnic disparities in emergency department opioid prescription for pain-related conditions

Dr. Astha Singhal, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, published a study that found a racial disparity in opioid prescriptions for emergency department visits for non-definitive pain-related conditions. [More]
College students who misuse stimulant medications more likely to exhibit clinical psychiatric dysfunction

College students who misuse stimulant medications more likely to exhibit clinical psychiatric dysfunction

A new study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that college students who misuse stimulant drugs are more likely to have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder or substance-use disorder than are students not misusing stimulants. [More]
Riverview Medical Center receives $120,000 to support addition of Addictions Counselor in the hospital

Riverview Medical Center receives $120,000 to support addition of Addictions Counselor in the hospital

Riverview Medical Center Foundation is honored to announce a gift of $120,000 from the Tigger House Foundation that will support the addition of an Addictions Counselor in the hospital's emergency department. [More]

New article underscores importance of shedding shame and secrecy of menstruation in adolescent literature

The Censoring of Menstruation in Adolescent Literature: A Growing Problem, an article published in Women's Reproductive Health, discusses the importance of "shedding the shame and secrecy" of menstruation in adolescent literature. [More]
Study finds high rate of misuse of seizure and pain drug

Study finds high rate of misuse of seizure and pain drug

With increasing public attention to overdose deaths and misuse of prescription medications in the United States, researchers today presented the results of a new study looking at abuse and misuse of gabapentin, a medication used to treat seizures and relieve nerve pain often associated with shingles. [More]
Study reveals alterations in silent synapses could trigger drug-related memories in addiction

Study reveals alterations in silent synapses could trigger drug-related memories in addiction

In addiction, cues in the environment can form strong associations with the drug of abuse. A new study in Biological Psychiatry suggests that alterations in silent synapses, inactive connections between neurons, could be the neural mechanism underlying the formation of these drug-related memories. [More]
UTA researchers find how changing estrogen levels make women more vulnerable to cocaine addiction

UTA researchers find how changing estrogen levels make women more vulnerable to cocaine addiction

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are studying how fluctuating estrogen levels make females increasingly sensitive to the rewarding effects of cocaine and ultimately, vulnerable to cocaine addiction. [More]
New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications

New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications

The high levels of caffeine in energy drinks may lead to cardiac complications, suggests a case report in the July/August Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
New review proposes neuroscience-based framework for diagnosis of addictive disorders

New review proposes neuroscience-based framework for diagnosis of addictive disorders

When it comes to an addictive disorder, you either have it or you don't. But this dichotomous nature of the diagnosis fails to recognize the complexity and diversity of addiction's origins and manifestation in people. [More]
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