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Major new review shows that every country in the world can afford to help citizens quit smoking

Major new review shows that every country in the world can afford to help citizens quit smoking

That is the conclusion of a major new review, written by leading world experts and published in the medical journal, Addiction. The review examined a wide range of measures that healthcare systems in different countries can adopt to help smokers to stop. [More]
Study sheds light on certain antagonist drugs that block physiological responses

Study sheds light on certain antagonist drugs that block physiological responses

Members of the Consolidated Research Group of Molecular Neurobiology of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Barcelona (UB), affiliated with the Centre for Networked Biomedical Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED), have published a study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) about the formation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) which allows understanding the unexpected behaviour of some antagonists that block physiological responses. [More]
Legal regulations on alcohol consumption have preventive effect on young consumers

Legal regulations on alcohol consumption have preventive effect on young consumers

Young men are at risk from alcohol consumption. Regulations such as the minimum legal drinking age can protect them. As a national study headed by UZH scientists reveals: The more legal measures for alcohol prevention are enforced in a canton, the less young men drink excessively. However, this is not effective for high-risk consumers such as young men with a tendency towards sensation seeking or antisocial behavior. [More]
New tool combines drugs to target kinase dependency in cancer

New tool combines drugs to target kinase dependency in cancer

Targeted therapies attack a cancer's genetic sensitivities. However, it can be difficult to discover the genetics driving a patient's cancer, and the effects of drugs designed to target a genetic abnormality often go beyond their intended target alone. The result is threefold: sometimes a drug is prescribed to treat a target that proves to be irrelevant to the disease, sometimes an existing drug could be used to treat a cancer for which there is no approved targeted therapy, and sometimes a combination of targeted treatments could be used to simultaneously silence more than one genetic cause of a patient's cancer. [More]
Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Every addiction is characterized by a strong desire for a certain addictive substance, be it nicotine, alcohol or other drug. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland recently conducted a study on heroin addiction and demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol can reduce addictive cravings. [More]
CU-Boulder study reveals how and when placebo effect works

CU-Boulder study reveals how and when placebo effect works

You don't think you're hungry, then a friend mentions how hungry he is or you smell some freshly baked pizza and whoaaa, you suddenly feel really hungry. Or, you've had surgery and need a bit of morphine for pain. As soon as you hit that button you feel relief even though the medicine hasn't even hit your bloodstream. [More]
Teens using marijuana for medical reasons more likely to become addicted to it

Teens using marijuana for medical reasons more likely to become addicted to it

A new University of Michigan study finds that teens using marijuana for medical reasons are 10 times more likely to say they are hooked on marijuana than youth who get marijuana illegally. [More]
Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who successfully lowered their nicotine intake when they were switched to low-nicotine cigarettes were unable to curb their smoking habits in the long term, according to a study by researchers at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center. [More]
Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Growing up in West Virginia, Jill Turner saw firsthand the kind of havoc that drug addiction can wreak. "I had a lot of friends who had very promising lives and promising careers ahead of them," the assistant professor in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy says, "but they ended up either overdosing or going to jail for drug-related stuff. It's one of the reasons I went into drug addiction research." [More]
Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock now offers fully integrative medicine services to Central Texans

Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock now offers fully integrative medicine services to Central Texans

Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock is now offering integrative medicine services to Central Texans that include massage therapy and acupuncture at two of its regional clinics: Scott & White Clinic - Avery Ranch and Baylor Scott & White Clinic - Round Rock South. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

Cannabis -- marijuana, hashish -- was used as a go-to medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. But the therapeutic use of marijuana was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to a growing awareness of the dangers of addiction. The significant medical benefits of marijuana in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's, cancer, and multiple sclerosis have only recently been reinvestigated. [More]
Neuronal activity in the brain's prefrontal cortex is nuanced and complex, new study finds

Neuronal activity in the brain's prefrontal cortex is nuanced and complex, new study finds

Results of a new study reported this week by David Moorman of the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Gary Aston-Jones of Rutgers University suggest that adjusting behavior based on previous events involves an unexpected mix of neurons working together in the brain's prefrontal cortex. [More]
SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU pain researcher Daniela Salvemini has been awarded the NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) to solve an alarming problem: pain killers that are capable of quelling terrible pain also carry debilitating side effects and significant risk of addiction. [More]
Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Recent years have seen an unprecedented growth in number and availability of new synthetic psychoactive drugs in the US and worldwide. In 2014, 101 new psychoactive drugs were identified, worldwide. Such drugs are often sold as "legal" highs or "research chemicals" over the internet or in head shops. Among these new drugs, "bath salts" appear to be one of the more commonly used in the US. [More]
New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

High-fat feeding can cause impairments in the functioning of the mesolimbic dopamine system, says Stephanie Fulton of the University of Montreal and the CHUM Research Centre. This system is a critical brain pathway controlling motivation. Fulton's findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, may have great health implications. [More]
New study finds that intellectual pursuits can buffer the brain's reward system against drug dependence

New study finds that intellectual pursuits can buffer the brain's reward system against drug dependence

Challenging the idea that addiction is hardwired in the brain, a new UC Berkeley study of mice suggests that even a short time spent in a stimulating learning environment can rewire the brain's reward system and buffer it against drug dependence. [More]
NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

A plan to ensure that evidence-based psychosocial interventions are routinely used in clinical practice and made a part of clinical training for mental health professionals was released today by the National Academy of Medicine. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology to take place in Amsterdam

28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology to take place in Amsterdam

Europe's largest meeting for the science and treatment of disorders of the brain, the 28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology will take place at the Amsterdam RAI from 29 August to 1 September 2015. [More]
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