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Adenine is one of the four bases in DNA that make up the letters ATGC, adenine is the "A". The others are guanine, cytosine, and thymine. Adenine always pairs with thymine.
Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Some three billion base pairs make up the human genome-the floor plan of life. In 2003, the Human Genome Project announced the successful decryption of this code, a tour de force that continues to supply a stream of insights relevant to human health and disease. [More]
Researchers identify steps by which cell removes RNA from cytoplasm

Researchers identify steps by which cell removes RNA from cytoplasm

RNA encodes the proteins that play a key role in cellular reproduction, but the manner in which cells regulate its removal once these proteins are synthesized remains a mystery. One piece of this mystery has been solved as researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who have identified the steps by which a cell removes RNA from the cytoplasm. [More]
New optical imaging technique can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes

New optical imaging technique can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes

An optical imaging technique that measures metabolic activity in cancer cells can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes, and it can detect responses to treatment as early as two days after therapy administration, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Researchers develop computational model to accurately simulate complex twists of RNA

Researchers develop computational model to accurately simulate complex twists of RNA

A computational model developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the first to accurately simulate the complex twists of a short sequence of RNA as it folds into a critical hairpin structure known as a "tetraloop." [More]
Findings uncover epigenomic modification that occurs during brain formation

Findings uncover epigenomic modification that occurs during brain formation

Changes in the epigenome, including chemical modifications of DNA, can act as an extra layer of information in the genome, and are thought to play a role in learning and memory, as well as in age-related cognitive decline. [More]
Kinase inhibitors: an interview with Jan Hoflack, CSO of Oncodesign

Kinase inhibitors: an interview with Jan Hoflack, CSO of Oncodesign

Kinase inhibitors are molecules that block the activity of kinases. Kinases are a specific class of enzymes. They are extremely important in signal transduction processes in the human body meaning that they actually regulate most of the physiological processes that take place in the body. [More]
Individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA detected by new method involving chemical modification and nanopore analysis

Individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA detected by new method involving chemical modification and nanopore analysis

Changes in the bases that make up DNA act as markers, telling a cell which genes it should read and which it shouldn’t. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a British team has now introduced a new method that makes it possible to enrich the rare gene segments that contain the modified base hydroxymethylcytosine and to identify individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA. Such modifications are associated with autoimmune diseases and cancer. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism through which mitochondria control breast tumor aggressiveness

Researchers identify mechanism through which mitochondria control breast tumor aggressiveness

Doctors currently struggle to determine whether a breast tumor is likely to shift into an aggressive, life-threatening mode-an issue with profound implications for treatment. Now a group from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has identified a mechanism through which mitochondria, the powerhouses of a cell, control tumor aggressiveness. [More]

UiO researchers discover enzyme critical for spread of cancer

Enzyme hunters at UiO have discovered the function of an enzyme that is important in the spreading of cancer. Cancer researchers now hope to inhibit the enzyme. [More]
University of Sheffield scientists reveal secrets of DNA repair

University of Sheffield scientists reveal secrets of DNA repair

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have unlocked one of the secrets to DNA repair -helping doctors identify DNA base damage and a patient's susceptibility to certain types of cancer. [More]
BioCryst announces withdrawal of BCX5191 IND following discussion with FDA

BioCryst announces withdrawal of BCX5191 IND following discussion with FDA

BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the withdrawal of its Investigational New Drug application (IND) for the antiviral nucleoside, BCX5191, following a discussion with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). [More]
Male infertility linked to an enzyme complex issue

Male infertility linked to an enzyme complex issue

An enzyme complex present in sperm plasma membranes plays an important role in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in sperm with abnormal morphology, researchers have shown. [More]

People with guanine version of rs55705857 SNP more likely to develop gliomas

People who carry a "G" instead of an "A" at a specific spot in their genetic code have roughly a six-fold higher risk of developing certain types of brain tumors, a Mayo Clinic and University of California, San Francisco study has found. The [More]

Gene discovery made for infant-onset blindness

Researchers have discovered that mutations in the NMNAT1 gene encoding nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 are present in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis. [More]

Researchers map significant portion of functional sequences of mouse genome

Popularly dubbed "the book of life," the human genome is extraordinarily difficult to read. But without full knowledge of its grammar and syntax, the genome's 2.9 billion base-pairs of adenine and thymine, cytosine and guanine provide limited insights into humanity's underlying genetics. [More]
High doses of tiny milk vitamin produces numerous health benefits in mice

High doses of tiny milk vitamin produces numerous health benefits in mice

A novel form of vitamin B3 found in milk in small quantities produces remarkable health benefits in mice when high doses are administered, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Polytechnic School in Lausanne, Switzerland. [More]
New easy-to-use Bayer blood glucose monitoring system

New easy-to-use Bayer blood glucose monitoring system

A new blood glucose monitoring (BGM) system from Bayer, the CONTOUR Next EZ meter and CONTOUR Next test strips, proved easy to use and highly accurate in the hands of intended users -- patients and their healthcare professionals (HCPs) - according to a clinical study presented at the American Diabetes Association 72nd Scientific Sessions in Philadelphia, PA. [More]
Researchers identify novel base modification in RNA

Researchers identify novel base modification in RNA

Over the past decade, research in the field of epigenetics has revealed that chemically modified bases are abundant components of the human genome and has forced us to abandon the notion we've had since high school genetics that DNA consists of only four bases. [More]
Brain size and IQ secret may lie in genes: Study

Brain size and IQ secret may lie in genes: Study

The study, conducted by a team of more than 200 scientists from 100 institutions worldwide, measured the size of the brain and its memory centers in thousands of MRI images from 21,151 healthy people while simultaneously screening their DNA. According to the researchers, a variant in a gene called HMGA2 affected the brain size, as well as a person's intelligence. [More]
Huntington’s disease may protect against cancer: Study

Huntington’s disease may protect against cancer: Study

Dr Jianguang Ji, Lund University, and Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden, and colleagues investigated data from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Researchers analyzed Swedish hospital data from 1969 to 2008. They found 1,510 patients with Huntington's disease. During the study period, 91 of those patients subsequently developed cancer. The authors said that was 53% lower than the levels expected for the general population. [More]