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Adenosine is a nucleoside composed of a molecule of adenine attached to a ribose sugar molecule (ribofuranose) moiety via a ß-N9-glycosidic bond.
Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

A new scientific study has identified why colorectal cancer cells depend on a specific nutrient, and a way to starve them of it. Over one million men and women are living with colorectal cancer in the United States. [More]
New mass spectrometry imaging protocol allows analysis of metabolite composition of tissues

New mass spectrometry imaging protocol allows analysis of metabolite composition of tissues

In biomedical research, working with tissue samples is indispensable because it permits insights into the biological reality of patients, for example, in addition to those gained from Petri dishes and computer simulations. [More]
Scientists identify timing of major metabolic shift in developing neurons

Scientists identify timing of major metabolic shift in developing neurons

Our brains can survive only for a few minutes without oxygen. Salk Institute researchers have now identified the timing of a dramatic metabolic shift in developing neurons, which makes them become dependent on oxygen as a source of energy. [More]
BetterYou’s transdermal MagnesiumOil Spray trio certified on Informed-Sport programme

BetterYou’s transdermal MagnesiumOil Spray trio certified on Informed-Sport programme

A transdermal trio of MagnesiumOil Sprays by health pioneers BetterYou has been certified for inclusion in the kit bags of the world’s elite sporting stars and coaches. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
Boosting mitochondria transport may facilitate neuronal regeneration

Boosting mitochondria transport may facilitate neuronal regeneration

Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke have discovered that boosting the transport of mitochondria along neuronal axons enhances the ability of mouse nerve cells to repair themselves after injury. [More]
Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

A new study is further burnishing copper's reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology. A research team led by a scientist at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that copper plays a key role in metabolizing fat. [More]
Single enzyme doing the work of a trio could offer precise way to treat diseases

Single enzyme doing the work of a trio could offer precise way to treat diseases

Researchers identified a single enzyme doing the work of a trio thought necessary to control a common cellular signaling process being pursued as a therapeutic target. [More]
Researchers investigate effects of non-allergenic components of pollen on allergy sufferers

Researchers investigate effects of non-allergenic components of pollen on allergy sufferers

Up to now, research into pollen allergies has largely focused on allergens - those components of pollen that trigger hypersensitivity reactions. When it comes into contact with the nasal mucous membrane, however, pollen releases a host of other substances in addition to allergens. [More]
Rapamycin drug could target neural damage linked to Leigh syndrome

Rapamycin drug could target neural damage linked to Leigh syndrome

Salk Institute scientists showed how an FDA-approved drug boosts the health of brain cells by limiting their energy use. Like removing unnecessary lighting from a financially strapped household to save on electricity bills, the drug--called rapamycin--prolongs the survival of diseased neurons by forcing them to reduce protein production to conserve cellular energy. [More]
African sleeping sickness parasite has defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals

African sleeping sickness parasite has defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals

Researchers from Umea University in Sweden have discovered that the single-celled parasite causing African sleeping sickness has a defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals under development against the disease. The deadly parasite has an enzyme that can cleave and hence disarm adenosine analogue pharmaceuticals. This according to a study recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
Cornell researchers discover potential way to penetrate blood brain barrier

Cornell researchers discover potential way to penetrate blood brain barrier

Cornell researchers have discovered a way to penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) that may soon permit delivery of drugs directly into the brain to treat disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and chemotherapy-resistant cancers. [More]
Researchers identify vital inflammatory mechanisms in type 1 diabetes, obesity-related kidney dysfunction

Researchers identify vital inflammatory mechanisms in type 1 diabetes, obesity-related kidney dysfunction

In a new study, published in the online edition of the journal EBioMedicine, a multi-disciplinary team led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified key inflammatory mechanisms underlying type 1 diabetes and obesity-related kidney dysfunction. [More]
Manipulation of NAD could lead to potential therapy for acute kidney injury

Manipulation of NAD could lead to potential therapy for acute kidney injury

Approximately one out of five hospitalized adults and one out of three hospitalized children worldwide experience acute kidney injury, the sudden loss of kidney function. Many different factors, including surgery, chemotherapy or shock, can lead to acute kidney injury, but exactly why the kidneys are so vulnerable to these and other stressors has not been well understood. [More]
Discovery may provide potential target for new therapies to treat bipolar disorder

Discovery may provide potential target for new therapies to treat bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder, which affects nearly eight million Americans, takes a toll not only on patients, but also on their families and communities. [More]
Polyunsaturated lipids can alter binding rate of two receptors involved in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's

Polyunsaturated lipids can alter binding rate of two receptors involved in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's

A study published in the prestigious journal Scientific Reports from the Nature group demonstrates, for the first time and using computational tools, that polyunsaturated lipids can alter the binding rate of two types of receivers involved in certain nervous system diseases. [More]
Study shows new RNA letter as regulatory key to control gene expression

Study shows new RNA letter as regulatory key to control gene expression

DNA, RNA, protein -- the end. Or is it? Until recently, the pattern used to encode genetic information into our cells was considered to be relatively straightforward: four letters (A,G,C,T) for DNA and four (A,G,C,U) for RNA. This equation, however, turned out to be oversimplified -- RNA was holding out. [More]
Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

New research findings published in the February 2016 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that a new therapeutic strategy for HIV may already be available by repurposing an existing prescription drug. [More]
Researchers reveal specific enzyme responsible for sensing energy source that fuels growth of cancer cells

Researchers reveal specific enzyme responsible for sensing energy source that fuels growth of cancer cells

An international research team formed by a University of Cincinnati cancer researcher has shown for the first time that a specific enzyme is responsible for sensing the available supply of GTP, an energy source that fuels the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. The research underscores the enzyme's potential to become a therapeutic target for future cancer drugs. [More]
Antiscarring paste can halt fibrosis caused by radiation treatment

Antiscarring paste can halt fibrosis caused by radiation treatment

An antiscarring paste when applied to the skin of mice halts fibrosis caused by the radiation used in cancer therapy. That is according to a study led by researchers at Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center to be published tomorrow in the January edition of the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, or FASEB. [More]
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