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Adenosine is a nucleoside composed of a molecule of adenine attached to a ribose sugar molecule (ribofuranose) moiety via a ß-N9-glycosidic bond.
Researchers identify mechanism that explains reason for persistence of hepatitis C virus

Researchers identify mechanism that explains reason for persistence of hepatitis C virus

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. [More]

Caffeine has positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease

As part of a German-French research project, a team led by Dr. Christa E. Müller from the University of Bonn and Dr. David Blum from the University of Lille was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers find new drug target for mitochondrial dysfunction

Researchers find new drug target for mitochondrial dysfunction

Mitochondria, long known as "cellular power plants" for their generation of the key energy source adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are essential for proper cellular functions. Mitochondrial defects are often observed in a variety of diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, and are the hallmarks of a number of genetic mitochondrial disorders whose manifestations range from muscle weakness to organ failure. Despite a fairly strong understanding of the pathology of such genetic mitochondrial disorders, efforts to treat them have been largely ineffective. [More]
Monash University research offers new hope to people with heart attacks

Monash University research offers new hope to people with heart attacks

Melbourne scientists are a step closer to creating a new drug to stop a heart attack in its tracks and reduce the damage caused, without any side effects. [More]
Metabolic profiling of liver cells suggests new treatments for cirrhosis patients

Metabolic profiling of liver cells suggests new treatments for cirrhosis patients

In a new study that could help doctors extend the lives of patients awaiting liver transplants, a Rice University-led team of researchers examined the metabolic breakdown that takes place in liver cells during late-stage cirrhosis and found clues that suggest new treatments to delay liver failure. [More]
H4 receptor activation plays part in NSCLC progression

H4 receptor activation plays part in NSCLC progression

Histamine H4 receptor activation decreases epithelial-to-mesenchymal transmission in non-small-cell lung cancer, Chinese research shows. [More]

Tissue repair drug can improve healing rates in people with diabetic foot ulcer

Patients were twice as likely to have a diabetic foot ulcer heal within eight weeks when they were treated with a tissue repair drug versus a placebo, according to new research accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Researchers identify protein that regulates how genetic information transcribed from DNA to mRNA

Researchers identify protein that regulates how genetic information transcribed from DNA to mRNA

Molecular biologists from Indiana University are part of a team that has identified a protein that regulates the information present in a large number of messenger ribonucleic acid molecules that are important for carrying genetic information from DNA to protein synthesis. [More]
Researchers identify new subgroup of patients suffering from schizophrenia with motor disorders

Researchers identify new subgroup of patients suffering from schizophrenia with motor disorders

​Researchers led by Marta Barrachina, Institute of Neuropathology of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) have identified a new subgroup of patients suffering from schizophrenia characterized by motor disorders. [More]
EU-sponsored TumAdoR project targets relationship between immune system and cancer growth

EU-sponsored TumAdoR project targets relationship between immune system and cancer growth

​A multinational set of seven teams is banding together to develop a drug that may potentially fight many different cancers through an antibody that would work within the body's metabolic system. [More]

Adenosine deaminase has potential to improve prognosis, diagnosis and treatment of ESCC

Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (ESCC), the major histological form of esophageal cancer, is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have discovered a biomarker, called adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1), which has the potential to improve the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disease. [More]

Editing of protein-making sequences promotes development of ESCC, find NUS researchers

Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, the major histological form of esophageal cancer, is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Scientists from the National University of Singapore have discovered a biomarker, called adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1, which has the potential to improve the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disease. [More]
CF101 drug fails to meet primary efficacy endpoint in phase III study for Dry Eye Syndrome

CF101 drug fails to meet primary efficacy endpoint in phase III study for Dry Eye Syndrome

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that its subsidiary OphthaliX Inc. released results from a 24 week, placebo-controlled phase III study involving 237 patients with moderate-to-severe Dry Eye Syndrome who were treated with its licensed drug CF101, an A3 adenosine receptor agonist. [More]

Can-Fite reports positive results from CF101 Phase IIb study for rheumatoid arthritis

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced results from a 12-week, placebo-controlled Phase IIb study involving 79 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis ("RA") for its proprietary drug CF101, an A3 adenosine receptor ("A3AR") agonist. [More]
Researchers identify new method to predict outcomes in heart failure patients

Researchers identify new method to predict outcomes in heart failure patients

Researchers at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have identified a new method to determine whether a patient's heart will fail, which in the future may help physicians better treat patients and tailor therapeutic interventions. [More]
Researchers find decreased energy metabolism in heart cells as significant independent risk factor

Researchers find decreased energy metabolism in heart cells as significant independent risk factor

Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a new way to predict which heart failure patients are likely to see their condition get worse and which ones have a better prognosis. Their study is one of the first to show that energy metabolism within the heart, measured using a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging test, is a significant predictor of clinical outcomes, independent of a patient's symptoms or the strength of the heart's ability to pump blood, known as the ejection fraction. [More]
Scientists use RNAi technology to reveal genes responsible for treating Parkinson's disease

Scientists use RNAi technology to reveal genes responsible for treating Parkinson's disease

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used RNA interference (RNAi) technology to reveal dozens of genes which may represent new therapeutic targets for treating Parkinson's disease. The findings also may be relevant to several diseases caused by damage to mitochondria, the biological power plants found in cells throughout the body. [More]
Sinai Hospital reports results from Phase 2a trial of apo A-I infusion therapy CSL112

Sinai Hospital reports results from Phase 2a trial of apo A-I infusion therapy CSL112

Researchers from the Sinai Center for Thrombosis Research presented findings from a Phase 2a trial substudy that examined the antiplatelet effects of CSL112, a novel apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) infusion therapy, at the American Heart Association 2013 Scientific Sessions. [More]
Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteria anticipates and turns immune defenses against the host

Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteria anticipates and turns immune defenses against the host

Around 20 percent of all humans are persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, a leading cause of skin infections and one of the major sources of hospital-acquired infections, including the antibiotic-resistant strain MRSA. [More]

Novel approach confirms dysfunctional energy production in schizophrenia

A method of directly assessing creatine kinase in the brain provides “direct and compelling” evidence for abnormal bioenergetics in the brains of patients with schizophrenia, say the study authors. [More]