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Adenosine is a nucleoside composed of a molecule of adenine attached to a ribose sugar molecule (ribofuranose) moiety via a ß-N9-glycosidic bond.
Alcohol consumption interferes with sleep homeostasis

Alcohol consumption interferes with sleep homeostasis

Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that drinking alcohol to fall asleep interferes with sleep homeostasis, the body's sleep-regulating mechanism. [More]
Can-Fite to commence pre-clinical development program of CF602 drug for sexual dysfunction

Can-Fite to commence pre-clinical development program of CF602 drug for sexual dysfunction

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, today reported that it will initiate a pre-clinical development program of its next generation drug CF602 for the indication of sexual dysfunction. Upon successful completion, the company intends to file an IND with the FDA to allow human Phase I studies. [More]
Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Nine groups of scientists will receive funding totaling $5.9 million in 2014 to work together on increasing the understanding of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the leading cause of death from epilepsy. The consortium becomes the second Center Without Walls, an initiative to speed the pace of research on difficult problems in epilepsy by promoting collaborative research. [More]
Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve is one of two universities in the country selected to lead a $27.3 million international effort to identify the causes of a mysterious and deadly phenomenon that strikes people with epilepsy without warning. [More]
Commonly used osteoporosis medications may also prevent lung, breast and colon cancers

Commonly used osteoporosis medications may also prevent lung, breast and colon cancers

The most commonly used medications for osteoporosis worldwide, bisphosphonates, may also prevent certain kinds of lung, breast and colon cancers, according to two studies led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health and other academic institutions have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain including pain caused by chemotherapeutic agents and bone cancer pain suggesting a promising new approach to pain relief. [More]
Protein complex plays key role in detecting tumor cells, promotes anti-tumor response

Protein complex plays key role in detecting tumor cells, promotes anti-tumor response

A recently discovered protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies published in the Nov. 20 issue of the journal Immunity. [More]
Cocaine disrupts woman's estrus cycle, may explain sex differences in cocaine addiction

Cocaine disrupts woman's estrus cycle, may explain sex differences in cocaine addiction

Women are more sensitive to the effects of cocaine and more susceptible to cocaine abuse than men. Cocaine's ability to disrupt a woman's estrus cycle may explain the sex differences in cocaine addiction, and new evidence that caffeine may be neuroprotective and able to block cocaine's direct effects on the estrus cycle reveals novel treatment possibilities, according to an article published in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
Janssen working with The Union to evaluate SIRTURO (bedaquiline) in patients with MDR-TB

Janssen working with The Union to evaluate SIRTURO (bedaquiline) in patients with MDR-TB

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced a collaboration with the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) to include SIRTURO (bedaquiline) in the STREAM Study. [More]
Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Two studies recently published in Cell Transplantation reveal that cell transplantation may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), a major cause of disability and paralysis with no current restorative therapies. [More]
Researchers discover new signaling pathway to fight excess body weight

Researchers discover new signaling pathway to fight excess body weight

The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Abbvie announces multiple study results of veliparib investigational compound in NSCLC patients

Abbvie announces multiple study results of veliparib investigational compound in NSCLC patients

AbbVie released interim results from an ongoing Phase 2 study of its investigational compound veliparib in combination with chemotherapy, which showed a 35 percent improvement (P-value=0.14) in progression-free survival (PFS) and a 30 percent improvement (P-value=0.21) in overall survival (OS) in patients with previously untreated metastatic or advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
Shuganjieyu capsule effectively reverses depressive by increasing neurotrophic factor

Shuganjieyu capsule effectively reverses depressive by increasing neurotrophic factor

Shuganjieyu capsule has been approved for clinical treatment by the State Food and Drug Administration of China since 2008. In the clinic, Shuganjieyu capsule is often used to treat mild to moderate depression. [More]
Study: Stress can disrupt process of fat tissue development

Study: Stress can disrupt process of fat tissue development

Using experimental models, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) showed that adenosine, a metabolite released when the body is under stress or during an inflammatory response, stops the process of adipogenesis, when adipose (fat) stem cells differentiate into adult fat cells. [More]
Can-Fite's CF102 drug gets approval in Israel for patient with hepatocellular carcinoma

Can-Fite's CF102 drug gets approval in Israel for patient with hepatocellular carcinoma

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that the Israeli Ministry of Health has approved the use of its drug CF102 for a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer, under the country's Compassionate Use Program. [More]
Single dose restores normal cellular signaling in mouse model of autism

Single dose restores normal cellular signaling in mouse model of autism

In a further test of a novel theory that suggests autism is the consequence of abnormal cell communication, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that an almost century-old drug approved for treating sleeping sickness also restores normal cellular signaling in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the neurological disorder in animals that were the human biological age equivalent of 30 years old. [More]
Researchers demonstrate potential of retinoic acid in preventing type 2 diabetes complications

Researchers demonstrate potential of retinoic acid in preventing type 2 diabetes complications

At a time when obesity, type 2 diabetes, and their complications are a veritable epidemic worldwide, researchers at the University of Montreal and CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM) recently demonstrated the potential of retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of Vitamin A, in treating obesity and type 2 diabetes and preventing their cardiovascular complications. [More]
Celgene: OTEZLA phase III study for psoriatic arthritis meets primary endpoint

Celgene: OTEZLA phase III study for psoriatic arthritis meets primary endpoint

Celgene International Sàrl, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG), today announced results of additional analyses from the phase III clinical trials of OTEZLA, the Company's oral, selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4). [More]
P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

We already understand the many steps involved in blood clotting in great mechanistic detail. The process of blood vessels closing off in response to injury is necessary for preserving life, but blood platelets that are over-active, or activated inappropriately because of unstable plaque, can lead to heart attacks and strokes. [More]