Adenovirus News and Research RSS Feed - Adenovirus News and Research

Adenoviruses most commonly cause respiratory illness; however, depending on the infecting serotype, they may also cause various other illnesses, such as gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, cystitis, and rash illness. Symptoms of respiratory illness caused by adenovirus infection range from the common cold syndrome to pneumonia, croup, and bronchitis. Patients with compromised immune systems are especially susceptible to severe complications of adenovirus infection. Acute respiratory disease (ARD), first recognized among military recruits during World War II, can be caused by adenovirus infections during conditions of crowding and stress.
AMSBIO launches CellMax™ Cell Pellet Slides

AMSBIO launches CellMax™ Cell Pellet Slides

AMSBIO announces the launch of CellMax™ - a new range of high quality, consistent and affordable cell line FFPE slides. [More]
Protein delivery reagent assists neurodegeneration research

Protein delivery reagent assists neurodegeneration research

AMSBIO announces that Belgian researchers have cited use of BioPORTER Protein Delivery Reagent to introduce Tau seeds into HEK293 cells. BioPORTER Protein Delivery Reagent is a unique lipid formulation that allows direct translocation of proteins into living cells. [More]
Oxford University performs second phase of experimental Ebola vaccine trial

Oxford University performs second phase of experimental Ebola vaccine trial

Oxford University doctors and scientists are performing the second phase of clinical studies of an experimental Ebola vaccine regimen. The study is part of the EBOVAC2 project, a collaborative programme involving the University of Oxford, French Institute of Health and Medical Research as project coordinator, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Le Centre Muraz, Inserm Transfert and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. [More]
Ebola vaccine study begins in Dakar, Senegal

Ebola vaccine study begins in Dakar, Senegal

A trial to evaluate an Ebola vaccine has begun in Dakar, Senegal, after initial immunisations started at the Jenner Institute, Oxford University. The announcement comes as a conference in Oxford discusses the global response to Ebola and the implications for future drug and vaccine development. [More]
Hiroshima University researchers reveal molecular mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain

Hiroshima University researchers reveal molecular mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain

A research group from Hiroshima University demonstrated that the downregulation of spinal astrocyte connexin43 (Cx43) expression causes sustained neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. Controlling the Cx43 expression using pharmacological approaches or gene therapy might serve as novel therapeutic strategies ameliorate neurological disorders in general and neuropathic pain in particular. [More]
Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers have launched the world's first clinical trial of a novel investigational therapy that uses a combination of two viruses to attack and kill cancer cells, and stimulate an anti-cancer immune response. Previous research by this team and others worldwide suggests that this approach could be very powerful, and could have fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy and radiation, although it will take years to rigorously test through this trial and others. [More]
Turnstone announces ongoing enrollment of Marabex clinical trial

Turnstone announces ongoing enrollment of Marabex clinical trial

Turnstone Biologics Inc., a FACIT portfolio company, has announced the ongoing enrollment of the Marabex clinical trial assessing the safety and immune responses in patients with advanced or metastatic, MAGE-A3-expressing solid tumours. [More]
Researchers reveal how certain lipids help adenoviruses to enter the cell

Researchers reveal how certain lipids help adenoviruses to enter the cell

Adenoviruses cause numerous diseases, such as eye or respiratory infections, and they are widely used in gene therapy. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now discovered how these viruses penetrate the cells, a key step for infection and gene delivery. The cell unwillingly supports virus entry and infection by providing lipids that are normally used to repair damaged membranes. [More]
GMP grade cell cryopreservation media

GMP grade cell cryopreservation media

AMSBIO has announced the launch of GMP grade STEM-CELLBANKER® manufactured in strict compliance with Japanese, EU, US, and PICS good manufacturing practice guidelines. [More]
DNAtrix signs agreement to utilize Alcyone's MEMS platform for direct drug delivery into glioblastoma

DNAtrix signs agreement to utilize Alcyone's MEMS platform for direct drug delivery into glioblastoma

Alcyone Lifesciences, Inc., a leader in neural intervention systems for neurological conditions and targeted drug delivery, and DNAtrix Inc., a privately held biotechnology company and a leader in oncolytic virus therapy, have entered into an exclusive clinical collaboration. Under the agreement, DNAtrix will utilize Alcyone's MEMS Cannula (AMC) targeted delivery platform for the intratumoral delivery of DNX-2401, an oncolytic adenovirus and DNAtrix's lead product for the treatment of the most aggressive form of brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM). [More]
Experimental gene therapy holds promise against metastatic prostate cancer

Experimental gene therapy holds promise against metastatic prostate cancer

Even with the best available treatments, the median survival of patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer is only two to three years. Driven by the need for more effective therapies for these patients, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine have developed a unique approach that uses microscopic gas bubbles to deliver directly to the cancer a viral gene therapy in combination with an experimental drug that targets a specific gene driving the cancer's growth. [More]
T cell expansion technology: an interview with Alexander Malykhin, CVPF, University of Pennsylvania

T cell expansion technology: an interview with Alexander Malykhin, CVPF, University of Pennsylvania

T cells are taken from the patient’s blood and then modified using lentivirus, adenovirus or RNA electroporation. The modifications allow us to reprogram T cells to recognize cancer cells. [More]
Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors experienced negative health effects that persisted more than two years after the 2007-2008 Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV) outbreak in Uganda that claimed 39 lives. These findings are detailed in a paper published online today in Lancet ID. [More]
GenVec, Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology sign research collaboration agreement

GenVec, Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology sign research collaboration agreement

GenVec, Inc. today announced that it has signed a research collaboration agreement with the Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. [More]
New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

Results from the first phase 1 trial of an Ebola vaccine based on the current (2014) strain of the virus are today published in The Lancet. Until now, all tested Ebola virus vaccines have been based on the virus strain from the Zaire outbreak in 1976. The results suggest that the new vaccine is safe, and provokes an immune response in recipients, although further long-term testing will be needed to establish whether it can protect against the Ebola virus. [More]
Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

The fight to treat cancer and eradicate tumors will likely benefit from a new set of treatments if early development phases continue to show promise, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher stated that gene therapies that are able to deliver genetic material to a specific cell population or tumor that will result in the destruction of the tumor. [More]
GenVec collaborates with TheraBiologics to develop NSC-mediated cancer therapeutics

GenVec collaborates with TheraBiologics to develop NSC-mediated cancer therapeutics

GenVec, Inc. today announced that it has formed a collaboration with TheraBiologics to develop cancer therapeutics leveraging both GenVec's proprietary gene delivery platform and TheraBiologics' proprietary neural stem cell (NSC) technology. [More]
Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

With the chill of winter comes a spike in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which spreads more easily as people retreat indoors and come into close contact. The lung infection triggers persistent coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing, and is particularly hard on the very young and the very old. In fact, pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among U.S. children, with estimated medical costs of $1 billion annually. [More]
Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Respiratory viruses, not bacterial infections, are the most commonly detected causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to new research released Feb. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Using Cultrex BME 2 reduced growth factor to enable long-term culture of human hepatocytes

Using Cultrex BME 2 reduced growth factor to enable long-term culture of human hepatocytes

AMSBIO reports on the recent publication in Cell [1] by Dr Meritxell Huch, Prof Hans Clevers et al. of ground-breaking research using Cultrex BME2 reduced growth factor (organoid growth matrix) to enable long-term (>1 year) culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver. These results open up new experimental avenues towards the use of human liver material expanded in vitro as an alternative cell source for disease modeling, toxicology studies, drug testing, regenerative medicine and gene therapy. [More]
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