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African trypanosomiasis is also known as sleeping sickness. There are two types of African trypanosomiasis, East and West, named for the region of Africa in which they were historically found. People can get the disease if they are bitten by an infected tsetse fly, which is only found in Africa. Treatment is available for African trypanosomiasis, but it is fatal if left untreated.
Scientists uncover novel process by which APOL1 gene contributes to renal disease

Scientists uncover novel process by which APOL1 gene contributes to renal disease

A Children's National Health System research team has uncovered a novel process by which the gene APOL1 contributes to renal disease, according to a paper published November 18 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Research findings of protein may form foundation for new approach to antibiotics

Research findings of protein may form foundation for new approach to antibiotics

Researchers have made the first-ever detailed, atomic-level images of a peroxiredoxin, which has revealed a peculiar characteristic of this protein and might form the foundation for a new approach to antibiotics. [More]
African sleeping sickness parasite has defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals

African sleeping sickness parasite has defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals

Researchers from Umea University in Sweden have discovered that the single-celled parasite causing African sleeping sickness has a defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals under development against the disease. The deadly parasite has an enzyme that can cleave and hence disarm adenosine analogue pharmaceuticals. This according to a study recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
UGA study helps solve mystery of how African trypanosomes communicate

UGA study helps solve mystery of how African trypanosomes communicate

While scientists have known for years that African trypanosomes cause sleeping sickness, they've been left scratching their heads as to how these tiny single-celled organisms communicate. A University of Georgia study, published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, helps solve this mystery. [More]
Sohn Conference Foundation awards $50,000 grant to support cutting-edge pediatric clinical trial in New York

Sohn Conference Foundation awards $50,000 grant to support cutting-edge pediatric clinical trial in New York

The Sohn Conference Foundation today announced a $50,000 grant to support funding of a Phase 2 cutting-edge pediatric clinical trial from the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium (NMTRC) now extending to New York City. [More]
DNDi unveils plans to better respond to the needs of neglected patients

DNDi unveils plans to better respond to the needs of neglected patients

After having built the world's largest drug development pipeline for the most neglected diseases, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has unveiled plans for a more flexible, dynamic portfolio approach, integrating various operating models to better respond to the needs of patients, notably in low- and middle-income countries. The plan also paves the way for new diseases to be taken up in DNDi's portfolio. [More]
Study of genetic risk factors of IBD in African-Americans published in Gastroenterology journal

Study of genetic risk factors of IBD in African-Americans published in Gastroenterology journal

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, along with colleagues at Emory University and Cedars-Sinai, have published in the journal Gastroenterology the first major, in-depth analysis of genetic risk factors of inflammatory bowel disease in African-Americans. [More]
UC San Diego researchers launch clinical trial to evaluate safety, efficacy of suramin drug for autism

UC San Diego researchers launch clinical trial to evaluate safety, efficacy of suramin drug for autism

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have launched a clinical trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of an unprecedented drug therapy for autism. [More]
Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer HealthCare and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) have signed an agreement under which Bayer will provide the active ingredient emodepside to support DNDi in its effort to develop a new oral drug to treat river blindness (or onchocerciasis). The world's second leading infectious cause of blindness, river blindness is a neglected tropical disease caused by a filarial worm. [More]

Researchers identify compounds that could lead to discovery of new drugs for African sleeping sickness

In early drug discovery, you need a starting point, says North­eastern Uni­ver­sity asso­ciate pro­fessor of chem­istry and chemical biology Michael Pollastri. [More]
Single dose restores normal cellular signaling in mouse model of autism

Single dose restores normal cellular signaling in mouse model of autism

In a further test of a novel theory that suggests autism is the consequence of abnormal cell communication, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that an almost century-old drug approved for treating sleeping sickness also restores normal cellular signaling in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the neurological disorder in animals that were the human biological age equivalent of 30 years old. [More]
Protein M: an interview with Rajesh Grover, PhD, senior staff scientist, Lerner laboratory, TSRI

Protein M: an interview with Rajesh Grover, PhD, senior staff scientist, Lerner laboratory, TSRI

Protein M is a cell surface protein from Mycoplasma Genitalium that binds to all human antibodies. [More]
Researchers observe mating for the first time in microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness

Researchers observe mating for the first time in microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness

Caught in the act! Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness. This tropical disease is caused by trypanosomes, single-celled parasites that are found in the blood of those afflicted. [More]
Study shows X-ray lasers can generate complete 3-D model of protein from scratch

Study shows X-ray lasers can generate complete 3-D model of protein from scratch

A study shows for the first time that X-ray lasers can be used to generate a complete 3-D model of a protein without any prior knowledge of its structure. [More]
Furamidine drug may also be useful in treating cancers, immune-related diseases

Furamidine drug may also be useful in treating cancers, immune-related diseases

A class of drugs used to treat parasitic infections such as malaria may also be useful in treating cancers and immune-related diseases, a new WSU-led study has found. [More]
Genetic variations in African Americans with kidney disease contribute to rapid decline in kidney function

Genetic variations in African Americans with kidney disease contribute to rapid decline in kidney function

New research provides direct evidence that genetic variations in some African Americans with chronic kidney disease contribute to a more rapid decline in kidney function compared with white Americans. [More]
Researchers on the way to find cure against African sleeping sickness

Researchers on the way to find cure against African sleeping sickness

Researchers at Umeå University have identified drugs targeting infections of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei and are thereby well on the way to find a cure against African sleeping sickness. This is the kernel of a thesis, which will be publicly defended on 8 November 2013. [More]
Meclizine drug has the potential to treat certain infectious diseases and cancer

Meclizine drug has the potential to treat certain infectious diseases and cancer

Meclizine, an over-the-counter drug used for decades to treat nausea and motion sickness, has the potential for new uses to treat certain infectious diseases and some forms of cancer, according to Dr. Vishal M. Gohil, Texas A&M AgriLife Research biochemist. [More]
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