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NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has begun an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against yellow fever virus. [More]
Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

In our latest report – The Battle for Breath – the impact of lung disease in the UK, figures suggest that 1 in 5 (around 12.7 million) have been diagnosed with a lung condition in the UK. If you’re over the age of 70, this rises to 1 in 3. [More]
Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

A new study may explain why people who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy nevertheless experience a variety of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms after ingesting wheat and related cereals. [More]
Scientists seek to understand impact of pollution on seasonal allergies

Scientists seek to understand impact of pollution on seasonal allergies

A unique collaboration between University of Manchester Scientists is set to advance our understanding of how polluted cities impact on seasonal allergies. [More]
Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

A newly identified requirement of a modified human protein in ebolavirus (EBOV) replication, may unlock the door for new approaches to treating Ebola. [More]
Scientists clarify mechanism of defective immune defense in G6PD patients

Scientists clarify mechanism of defective immune defense in G6PD patients

Favism is a common hereditary disease, affecting around 400 million people worldwide. It is caused by a lack of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). [More]
Exposure to atmospheric dust, high temperatures can increase risk of bacterial meningitis

Exposure to atmospheric dust, high temperatures can increase risk of bacterial meningitis

Exposure to airborne dust and high temperatures are significant risk factors for bacterial meningitis, a new study by the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health has found. [More]
Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. [More]
Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

A better understanding of HIV latency is the key to eradicating the virus researchers at the University of North Carolina and partner institutions write in a perspective in the journal Science. [More]
Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Research published today in the journal, Nature Communications, provides new insights into the evolution of Mucorales fungi, which cause a fatal infection in ever-increasing segments of patient population, and several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic or diagnostic targets. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to an undetectable level in most chronically infected people, it cannot eliminate reservoirs of HIV that persist in latently infected immune cells. [More]
Study identifies ADAM33 gene as novel target for preventing asthma

Study identifies ADAM33 gene as novel target for preventing asthma

Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a potential and novel way of preventing asthma at the origin of the disease, a finding that could challenge the current understanding of the condition. [More]
Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding

Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding

For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India. [More]
Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

Women who took part in ASPIRE, a trial that found a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine was safe and helped protect against HIV, will soon be offered the opportunity to use the ring as part of a new study called HOPE. [More]
Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today. [More]
SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development is studying an investigational vaccine for yellow fever, a potentially deadly disease that is spread by the same mosquito that transmits Zika virus. [More]
Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

The recent emergence of bacterial infections that are resistant to many existing antibiotics is driving an urgent need for tools to quickly identify the small number of therapies that are still effective for individual patients. [More]
Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure. [More]
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