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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Researchers show how antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV infection in female reproductive tract

Researchers show how antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV infection in female reproductive tract

For the first time, investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have determined how antiretroviral therapy (ART) affects the way HIV disseminates and establishes infection in the female reproductive tract. [More]
UM SOM researchers reveal genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli

UM SOM researchers reveal genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli

A multi-disciplinary group of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have for the first time determined the genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli, which every year kills hundreds of thousands of people around the world. [More]
NIH researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for vibratory urticaria

NIH researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for vibratory urticaria

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation responsible for a rare form of inherited hives induced by vibration, also known as vibratory urticaria. Running, hand clapping, towel drying or even taking a bumpy bus ride can cause temporary skin rashes in people with this rare disorder. [More]
Simple method to purify cashew allergens could help scientists better understand allergic reactions

Simple method to purify cashew allergens could help scientists better understand allergic reactions

It's well known that peanuts can cause severe reactions in people who are allergic, but research suggests that the risk of developing a life-threatening reaction could be higher for those allergic to cashews. Now scientists have come up with a fast and simple method to purify the three main cashew allergens to help better grasp how they work and their effects on people. [More]
Children born to obese women with diabetes at higher risk of developing autism

Children born to obese women with diabetes at higher risk of developing autism

Children born to obese women with diabetes are more than four times as likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than children of healthy weight mothers without diabetes, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Eli Lilly and Company's Humulin R U-500 KwikPen(insulin human injection) 500 units/mL, a pre-filled device containing Humulin R U-500, a highly concentrated formulation of insulin. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Biophysicists have discovered why the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) are naturally somewhat resistant to antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones. Their findings, based on mapping the detailed three-dimensional structure of the drugs interacting with an essential enzyme in the TB germ, also reveal why some TB drugs are more potent than others and suggest how drug developers can make fluoroquinolones more efficacious against mutations that make the lung disease drug resistant. [More]
Omnicell's revolutionary medication automation cabinet system saves cost, increases efficiency

Omnicell's revolutionary medication automation cabinet system saves cost, increases efficiency

An 18-month trial in the trust which opened England’s first hospital dedicated to emergency care, Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital, has found that significant cost-savings and efficiencies can be made by installing a revolutionary medication automation cabinet system provided by Omnicell Ltd, a leading provider of medication adherence packaging and automated healthcare solutions. [More]
Study explores new approaches to prevent fall asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients

Study explores new approaches to prevent fall asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients

Experts from Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) co-led a team of researchers in studying new approaches to reducing fall asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients. [More]
Large-scale clinical trial to evaluate dengue vaccine launched in Brazil

Large-scale clinical trial to evaluate dengue vaccine launched in Brazil

A large-scale clinical trial to evaluate whether a candidate vaccine can prevent the mosquito-borne illness dengue fever has been launched in Brazil. The vaccine, TV003, was developed by scientists in the laboratory of Stephen Whitehead, Ph.D., at NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). [More]
Study finds communication gap between doctors and parents in management of children's food allergies

Study finds communication gap between doctors and parents in management of children's food allergies

When a child has a food allergy, it's critical for pediatricians and allergists to show parents when and how to use an epinephrine auto-injector and to provide a written emergency food allergy action plan for home and school. It is essential in case of a life-threatening reaction. [More]
Pre-existing nutritional deficits, immune dysfunction may increase hepatitis E risk during pregnancy

Pre-existing nutritional deficits, immune dysfunction may increase hepatitis E risk during pregnancy

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found a link between pre-existing nutritional deficits and immune dysfunction and the risk of hepatitis E infection during pregnancy. [More]
AlerSense develops world's first smart airborne allergy and asthma early warning system

AlerSense develops world's first smart airborne allergy and asthma early warning system

AlerSense Incorporated has created the world's first smart airborne allergy and asthma early warning system alerting consumers as particles and toxins build. AlerSense is an in-home unit when, combined with the mobile app, delivers accurate environmental readings, giving asthma and allergy sufferers precious time to remove themselves from, or alter the environment to possibly mitigate or avoid an allergy or asthma attack. [More]
UA researchers find genetic mutations associated with respiratory disease

UA researchers find genetic mutations associated with respiratory disease

Asthma affects more than 278 million people worldwide and can lead to serious consequences later in life. While current approved therapies address symptoms, they do not halt disease progression. [More]
Study may hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy affects mothers and offspring

Study may hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy affects mothers and offspring

The sequencing of the first genome involving a cockroach species may one day serve as a model system comparable to how research on mice can apply to humans. In this case, the model could hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy could affect both the mother and her offspring. [More]
Minor flu strains carry bigger viral punch

Minor flu strains carry bigger viral punch

Minor variants of flu strains, which are not typically targeted in vaccines, carry a bigger viral punch than previously realized, a team of scientists has found. Its research, which examined samples from the 2009 flu pandemic in Hong Kong, shows that these minor strains are transmitted along with the major strains and can replicate and elude immunizations. [More]
Treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis with regimens may improve outcomes

Treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis with regimens may improve outcomes

Treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) with regimens that include a greater number of drugs may improve outcomes, and baseline drug susceptibility testing (DST) could identify drugs with the greatest likelihood of success, according to a paper published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Asthma in childhood may increase risk of shingles

Asthma in childhood may increase risk of shingles

Nearly 1 million incidences of herpes zoster, which is also known as shingles, occur every year in the U.S., with an estimated one-third of all adults affected by age 80. Despite its prevalence, particularly between ages 50 and 59, it is still unclear why some individuals will develop shingles, and others will not. [More]

Azithromycin remains effective in treatment of urogenital chlamydia, confirms UAB study

In one of the most tightly controlled trials ever conducted of drugs used to treat sexually transmitted infections, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have confirmed that azithromycin remains effective in the treatment of urogenital chlamydia. [More]
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