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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Stable asthma prevalence masks increase in allergic phenotype

Stable asthma prevalence masks increase in allergic phenotype

The prevalence of childhood asthma in Sweden appears to have stabilised, with no increase seen between 1996 and 2006, researchers report. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
UC San Diego Health System opens nation's first angioedema treatment center

UC San Diego Health System opens nation's first angioedema treatment center

UC San Diego Health System in partnership with the U.S. Hereditary Angioedema Association, a non-profit patient advocacy organization, has opened the nation's first dedicated center for diagnosing and treating diverse forms of swelling, known collectively as angioedema. [More]
Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, and NewLink Genetics Corporation, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute NewLink's investigational rVSV-EBOV (Ebola) vaccine candidate. [More]
Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

New research has found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism -- a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment. [More]
Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may trigger peanut allergy

Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may trigger peanut allergy

Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may be a trigger of peanut allergy, according to a study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Scientists identify four new genes associated with severe food allergy

Scientists identify four new genes associated with severe food allergy

Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Because the genes appear to have roles in other allergic diseases and in inflammation, the findings may point toward potential new treatments for EoE. [More]
UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

Scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch were recognized with prestigious awards for their contributions in research at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting. [More]
Researchers discover a new way to combat influenza virus infection

Researchers discover a new way to combat influenza virus infection

The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then -- having multiplied -- bursts out of the cell to find others to infect. [More]
Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found. [More]
Edison announces initiation of full coverage on ADRs of DBV Technologies

Edison announces initiation of full coverage on ADRs of DBV Technologies

Edison Investment Research, a leading international investment research firm, announces the initiation of full coverage on the US-listed ADRs of DBV Technologies, the French allergy company focused on peanut allergy. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans professor awarded $1.8 million grant to target intra-abdominal infections

LSU Health New Orleans professor awarded $1.8 million grant to target intra-abdominal infections

Mairi Noverr, PhD, Associate Professor of Prosthodontics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Dentistry's Center of Excellence in Oral Biology, has been awarded a $1.8 million grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Successful treatments help HIV-infected persons achieve similar longevity as those without HIV

Successful treatments help HIV-infected persons achieve similar longevity as those without HIV

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV. [More]
Regeneron, Sanofi report positive results from dupilumab Phase 2b study in patients with asthma

Regeneron, Sanofi report positive results from dupilumab Phase 2b study in patients with asthma

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced positive results from the interim analysis of a dose-ranging Phase 2b study of dupilumab in adult patients with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe asthma. Dupilumab is an investigational therapy blocking IL-4 and IL-13, two cytokines required for the Th2 immune response. [More]
UW SMPH awarded $70 million grant to continue work on Inner-City Asthma Consortium

UW SMPH awarded $70 million grant to continue work on Inner-City Asthma Consortium

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health a seven-year, $70 million grant for its continuing work on the Inner-City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) -- a nationwide clinical research network to evaluate and develop promising new immune-based treatments. [More]
Child-mortality gap narrows between the poorest and wealthiest families in developing countries

Child-mortality gap narrows between the poorest and wealthiest families in developing countries

The child-mortality gap has narrowed between the poorest and wealthiest households in a majority of more than 50 developing countries, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. [More]
Exposure to indoor air pollution affects children's lungs

Exposure to indoor air pollution affects children's lungs

Children with asthma and hay fever often struggle with their breathing. Add secondhand smoke, kerosene and biomass fuel to the mix and allergy and asthma symptoms increase. [More]
Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life. [More]
UCLA study: Asthma harms more than just the lungs, may be more harmful than previously thought

UCLA study: Asthma harms more than just the lungs, may be more harmful than previously thought

Asthma may be more harmful than was previously thought, according to UCLA researchers who found that genetic damage is present in circulating, or peripheral, blood. Doctors previously thought that the genetic damage it caused was limited to the lungs. [More]
Precision awarded $28 million contract to provide management of disease-study specimens for NIAID

Precision awarded $28 million contract to provide management of disease-study specimens for NIAID

Precision for Medicine announced today that its subsidiary, Precision Bioservices, Inc., has been awarded a 7-year contract of up to $28 million to provide management and oversight of disease-study specimens for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]