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Researchers identify fungus that makes mosquitoes more susceptible to malaria infection

Researchers identify fungus that makes mosquitoes more susceptible to malaria infection

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified a fungus that compromises the immune system of mosquitoes, making them more susceptible to infection with the parasite that causes malaria. [More]
Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have identified a new form of an immune cell that protected mice from life-threatening lung infections under conditions that mimic cancer chemotherapy. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata—an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss—had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]
Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. [More]
New open access journal covers latest research on diseases affecting the head and neck areas

New open access journal covers latest research on diseases affecting the head and neck areas

The American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation is pleased to announce that OTO Open, the Academy's new and official open access journal will be joining the Academy's premier journal, Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, both published by SAGE Publishing. [More]
TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Tecfidera. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious. [More]
Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

A new study offers compelling evidence that a novel form of the dangerous superbug Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can spread to humans through consumption or handling of contaminated poultry. [More]
Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study. [More]
Researchers underscore importance of immune-based prevention to conquer cancer

Researchers underscore importance of immune-based prevention to conquer cancer

In a Perspective piece published this week in PNAS, cancer researchers from across the country, including faculty at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, write that a greater emphasis on immune-based prevention should be central to new efforts like the federal Cancer Moonshot program, headed by Vice President Joe Biden. [More]
Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear have discovered a new mutation in a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli that resists clearance by the body's own immune system by inhibiting white blood cells that ordinarily kill and remove bacteria. [More]
Female sex hormone appears to stave off worst effects of influenza infection

Female sex hormone appears to stave off worst effects of influenza infection

In mouse studies, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found that progesterone - a female sex hormone contained in most forms of hormone-based birth control - appears to stave off the worst effects of influenza infection and, in an unexpected finding, help damaged lung cells to heal more quickly. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Researchers discover new genes with potential to improve adoptive T cell therapy

Researchers discover new genes with potential to improve adoptive T cell therapy

A Yale Cancer Center research team has identified that two genes, NR4A1 and ABC transporters, mark a distinct subset of quiescent T cells within human tissues, and have developed methods to mobilize them into circulation for potential application in adoptive T cell therapy of cancer. [More]
Allergists show kids can be near food allergy triggers without fear

Allergists show kids can be near food allergy triggers without fear

Allergists realize people who are severely allergic to a food can experience great anxiety when encountering the food in any form. [More]
Chronic cough different than cough from cold, says allergist

Chronic cough different than cough from cold, says allergist

There's been a lot of talk about politicians and coughs lately. And we've all seen public figures struggle with it. [More]
TSRI, IAVI scientists reveal new reductionist vaccine strategy to fight against HIV

TSRI, IAVI scientists reveal new reductionist vaccine strategy to fight against HIV

A series of new studies led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative describe a potential vaccination strategy to jump-start the selection and evolution of broadly effective antibodies to prevent HIV infection. [More]
Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. [More]
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