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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
South African study shows that person-to person transmission drives drug-resistant TB epidemics

South African study shows that person-to person transmission drives drug-resistant TB epidemics

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine provides compelling evidence that extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is spread from person-to-person in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa from 2011-2014. [More]
Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Using a novel approach for imaging the movement of immune cells in living animals, researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases have identified what appear to be the initial steps leading to joint inflammation in a model of inflammatory arthritis. [More]
Researchers identify new principle for how epigenetic changes can occur

Researchers identify new principle for how epigenetic changes can occur

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have found evidence of a new principle for how epigenetic changes can occur. The principle is based on an enzyme, tryptase, that has epigenetic effects that cause cells to proliferate in an uncontrolled manner. [More]
New genital herpes vaccine candidate shows promising results in preclinical tests

New genital herpes vaccine candidate shows promising results in preclinical tests

Approximately 500 million people around the world are infected with the genital herpes virus known as herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2). [More]
Researchers discover how bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key immune defenses

Researchers discover how bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key immune defenses

Scientists have discovered how a unique bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key weapons in its fight against infection. [More]
Study shows evidence that person-to-person transmission drives spread of drug-resistant TB

Study shows evidence that person-to-person transmission drives spread of drug-resistant TB

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine provides compelling evidence that extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is spread from person-to-person in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa from 2011-2014. [More]
Influenza experts examine evolution of avian disease

Influenza experts examine evolution of avian disease

Few influenza viruses are as widespread and adaptable as avian influenza viruses, and scientists are not entirely sure why. [More]
Bees pose biggest public health threat in Australia, research shows

Bees pose biggest public health threat in Australia, research shows

An Australian-first national analysis of 13 years' data on bites and stings from venomous creatures reveals Australia's towns and cities are a hot-spot for encounters. [More]
Scientists unravel new genetic immunodeficiency that makes children vulnerable to mild illnesses

Scientists unravel new genetic immunodeficiency that makes children vulnerable to mild illnesses

A team of scientists led by prof. Adrian Liston and prof. Isabelle Meyts were able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. [More]
Research shows role played by PAMPs in immune system signaling and response

Research shows role played by PAMPs in immune system signaling and response

How big you are may be as important as what you look like, at least to immune system cells watching for dangerous bacteria and viruses. [More]
Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. [More]
Scientists identify how early responses of immune system can affect development of EBOV disease

Scientists identify how early responses of immune system can affect development of EBOV disease

A new mouse model of early Ebola virus infection has shown National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and colleagues how early responses of the immune system can affect development of EBOV disease. [More]
Cockroach bait may be easier, cheaper way to manage key asthma trigger in children

Cockroach bait may be easier, cheaper way to manage key asthma trigger in children

It may be easier and cheaper for parents to manage a key asthma trigger in children -- exposure to cockroaches -- than previously thought, according to a new Tulane University study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
UVC machines can cut transmission of four drug-resistant superbugs by 30%, study finds

UVC machines can cut transmission of four drug-resistant superbugs by 30%, study finds

A new tool -- a type of ultraviolet light called UVC -- could aid hospitals in the ongoing battle to keep drug-resistant bacteria from lingering in patient rooms and causing new infections. [More]
Drug-resistant deadly bacteria more widespread than previously thought, study finds

Drug-resistant deadly bacteria more widespread than previously thought, study finds

A family of highly drug-resistant and potentially deadly bacteria may be spreading more widely--and more stealthily -- than previously thought, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. [More]
Cattle-based vector control efforts may help eradicate malaria in India

Cattle-based vector control efforts may help eradicate malaria in India

The goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers. [More]
Plans for schools to hold spare adrenaline auto-injector continue to progress positively

Plans for schools to hold spare adrenaline auto-injector continue to progress positively

The plans for an amendment to legislation which will allow all state schools to hold a spare adrenaline injector for use in case of emergencies continues to progress positively. We have been informed today by the Department of Health that this change is to come into effect in October of this year. [More]
Study finds that T cells play important role in control of Zika infections

Study finds that T cells play important role in control of Zika infections

The worst of the global Zika virus outbreak may be over but many key questions remain, such as why the virus persists in certain tissues after the systemic infection has cleared; how does the immune system counteract the virus and protect against reinfection; what determines the likelihood of long-term complications? [More]
Researchers finding way to manipulate signals in bacteria to reduce infections

Researchers finding way to manipulate signals in bacteria to reduce infections

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy has received a five-year, $1.25 million federal grant to continue its research into how bacteria that cause streptococcal infections can be manipulated. [More]
Mothers' use of acid-suppressing medication during pregnancy may be linked to asthma in children

Mothers' use of acid-suppressing medication during pregnancy may be linked to asthma in children

Children born to mothers who take heartburn medication during pregnancy may have a greater risk of developing asthma, research suggests. [More]
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