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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Regeneron, Sanofi announce initiation of dupilumab Phase 3 study in adults with atopic dermatitis

Regeneron, Sanofi announce initiation of dupilumab Phase 3 study in adults with atopic dermatitis

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the first patients have been dosed in a Phase 3 clinical study of dupilumab, an investigational therapy that blocks IL-4 and IL-13 signaling, in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) that is not adequately controlled with topical AD medications. [More]
TSRI scientists identify long-sought activating molecules for subset of immune system cells

TSRI scientists identify long-sought activating molecules for subset of immune system cells

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified the long-sought activating molecules for a rare but crucial subset of immune system cells that help rally other white blood cells to fight infection. [More]
NIAID announces license agreement to develop dual-purpose candidate vaccines for rabies, Ebola

NIAID announces license agreement to develop dual-purpose candidate vaccines for rabies, Ebola

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced a new license agreement aimed at advancing dual-purpose candidate vaccines to protect against rabies and Ebola viruses. [More]
Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

In the nine years Parker has now served on the court, he has made the most of his opportunities. Child custody disputes, for instance, have made good occasions to expound on the role of religion in parental rights. [More]
Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

It's that time of year again. As days shorten, evenings become chilly and the trees start a showy display of color, it's time to roll up your sleeve and get your annual flu vaccine. [More]
Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center, a trusted NYC nursing home, urges senior citizens and their families to learn the basics of proper nutrition for senior citizens. The nursing facility's staff has created a short list of key tips for families and seniors looking to improve their mental and physical health through dietary changes. [More]
Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MRSA) continue to be among the most common pathogens that overwhelm the immune system, causing serious skin, soft tissue and life-threatening blood-borne infections. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $6.6 million NIH grant to study Lassa fever virus

TSRI scientists awarded $6.6 million NIH grant to study Lassa fever virus

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $6.6 million from the National Institutes of Health to lead an investigation of Lassa fever virus, the most prevalent virus-induced hemorrhagic fever disease in Africa. [More]
HIV-infected users of stimulants derive benefits from antiretroviral therapy

HIV-infected users of stimulants derive benefits from antiretroviral therapy

New clinical research from UC San Francisco shows that 341 HIV-infected men who reported using stimulants such as methamphetamine or cocaine derived life-saving benefits from being on antiretroviral therapy that were comparable to those of HIV-infected men who do not use stimulants. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

Professor Myron M. Levine, MD, Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that the CVD, in conjunction with its sister institution, The Center for Vaccine Development of Mali and the Ministry of Health of Mali, have begun a clinical trial in health care workers (and other front-line workers) to evaluate a promising experimental Ebola vaccine. [More]
Chronic contact allergy from metal orthopedic implant linked to aggressive form of skin cancer

Chronic contact allergy from metal orthopedic implant linked to aggressive form of skin cancer

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer. [More]
NanoBio to highlight prophylactic NE HSV-2 vaccine candidate at The Keystone Symposia Conference

NanoBio to highlight prophylactic NE HSV-2 vaccine candidate at The Keystone Symposia Conference

NanoBio Corporation today announced that the company will present data at The Keystone Symposia Conference, The Modes of Action of Vaccine Adjuvants, in Seattle on October 12, 2014. [More]
Study finds that skin exposure may trigger early peanut allergy in children

Study finds that skin exposure may trigger early peanut allergy in children

Many children may become allergic to peanuts before they first eat them, and skin exposure may be contribute to early sensitization, according to a study in mice led by Mount Sinai researchers and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Pediatric specialist in EGIDs helps lead $6.25 million NIH clinical research project

Pediatric specialist in EGIDs helps lead $6.25 million NIH clinical research project

A pediatric specialist in eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGIDs) at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado will help lead a five-year, $6.25 million clinical research project recently funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study: H7N9 flu vaccine combined with adjuvant is essential to promote protective immune response

Study: H7N9 flu vaccine combined with adjuvant is essential to promote protective immune response

A large, NIH-sponsored clinical trial of an experimental H7N9 avian influenza vaccine found an immune response that was believed to be protective in 59 percent of study participants who received two injections of the inactivated vaccine at the lowest dosage tested when mixed with an adjuvant – a component that boosts the body's immune response and enhances the effectiveness of inactivated influenza vaccines. [More]
Genetic differences influence asthma risk in Latinos

Genetic differences influence asthma risk in Latinos

Native American ancestry is associated with a lower asthma risk, but African ancestry is associated with a higher risk, according to the largest-ever study of how genetic variation influences asthma risk in Latinos, in whom both African and Native American ancestry is common. The study, led by UC San Francisco researchers, was published online October 6, 2014 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Ferring Pharmaceuticals to introduce new cranberry flavor option of PREPOPIK in 2015

Ferring Pharmaceuticals to introduce new cranberry flavor option of PREPOPIK in 2015

Colonoscopy is an important and widely used screening tool for colorectal cancer, but for many patients the bowel-preparation process is more uncomfortable than the procedure itself. To offer an alternative choice in bowel preparation, Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. will introduce a new cranberry flavor option of PREPOPIK in January 2015. [More]
Vitamin D supplement significantly reduces symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis

Vitamin D supplement significantly reduces symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis

A study conducted in more than 100 Mongolian schoolchildren found that daily treatment with a vitamin D supplement significantly reduced the symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis, a type of eczema. [More]
Diet may influence susceptibility to autoinflammatory bone disease in at-risk individuals

Diet may influence susceptibility to autoinflammatory bone disease in at-risk individuals

Diet-induced changes in the gut's bacterial ecosystem can alter susceptibility to an autoinflammatory bone disease by modifying the immune response, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists reported. The findings appeared September 28 as an advanced online publication of the scientific journal Nature. [More]