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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Children with strong family history of type 2 diabetes or CVD prone to have high cholesterol levels

Children with strong family history of type 2 diabetes or CVD prone to have high cholesterol levels

A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes shows that children with a strong family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or type 2 diabetes were found to have cholesterol levels significantly higher than children with no family history of those conditions. [More]
Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Simultaneous pre-treatment with antihistamines that block both the H1 and H4 antihistamine receptors suppressed the gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy in mice, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. [More]
Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Elimination of the food that triggers atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is associated with increased risk of developing immediate reactions to that food, according to the results of a large-scale study recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world's vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective. [More]
Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Elizabeth McQuaid, Ph.D., a staff psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, is leading the Phase II trial of an interactive software game developed to help children with food allergies better manage allergy symptoms, social situations and proper food avoidance. [More]
New collaborative research center to investigate promising aspects of mucosal immunology

New collaborative research center to investigate promising aspects of mucosal immunology

Immunology - and the idea that many diseases can best be addressed by boosting the body's own immune response - is one of the hottest areas in medical research and clinical treatment. [More]
Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

By studying the rare person -- about one in a million -- who can fight off viral infections more effectively than everyone else, investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a strategy to help the rest of us achieve this enhanced anti-viral state. [More]
NS5 viral protein could be promising vaccine target against Zika virus

NS5 viral protein could be promising vaccine target against Zika virus

A viral protein known as NS5 is a promising target for vaccines against Zika and related viruses, according to National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues at Mount Sinai's Icahn School of Medicine. [More]
Landmark study characterizes evolution of symptoms, signs of acute HIV infection

Landmark study characterizes evolution of symptoms, signs of acute HIV infection

Acute HIV infection (AHI) contributes significantly to HIV transmission and may be important for intervention strategies seeking to reduce incidence and achieve a functional cure. [More]
Introducing allergenic foods early in life may decrease sensitization risk

Introducing allergenic foods early in life may decrease sensitization risk

Children who had a diet that included cow's milk products, egg and peanut before age one were less likely to develop sensitization to the corresponding foods, according to new research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

A new study shows that repeated radiation therapy used to target tumors in the brain may not be as safe to healthy brain cells as previously assumed. [More]
ProBioGen will license GlymaxX® to Thermo Fisher Scientific for use in developing allergy diagnostics

ProBioGen will license GlymaxX® to Thermo Fisher Scientific for use in developing allergy diagnostics

ProBioGen, a leading specialist for contract development and manufacturing of complex glycoproteins and corresponding technologies, today announced that Thermo Fisher Scientific has licensed its GlymaxX® technology for use in development of allergy diagnostics. [More]
Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King's College London. [More]
Potential marker of disease activity identified for eosinophilic esophagitis

Potential marker of disease activity identified for eosinophilic esophagitis

Researchers have identified a potential marker of disease activity for a severe and often painful food allergic disease called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) - possibly sparing children with EoE the discomfort and risk of endoscopic procedures to assess whether their disease is active. [More]
Nationwide Children's mobile app may help people better self-manage asthma

Nationwide Children's mobile app may help people better self-manage asthma

Very early on in her life, 3-year-old Karma Taylor found herself frequently in the Emergency Department in the middle of the night as a result of breathing problems. Karma's mom, Joyce Kelso, felt like she was chasing after her daughter's asthma rather than staying ahead of it. [More]
Common misconceptions regarding gluten-free diet for children

Common misconceptions regarding gluten-free diet for children

The prevalence of celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disease, is increasing. The only treatment for CD is a gluten-free diet. However, the increasing prevalence of CD does not account for the disproportionate increase in growth of the gluten-free food industry (136% from 2013 to 2015). [More]
Researchers investigate effects of non-allergenic components of pollen on allergy sufferers

Researchers investigate effects of non-allergenic components of pollen on allergy sufferers

Up to now, research into pollen allergies has largely focused on allergens - those components of pollen that trigger hypersensitivity reactions. When it comes into contact with the nasal mucous membrane, however, pollen releases a host of other substances in addition to allergens. [More]
Better education for patients, doctors on disease symptoms may help reduce leprosy in Brazil

Better education for patients, doctors on disease symptoms may help reduce leprosy in Brazil

Better education for both patients and doctors on how to spot the early symptoms of leprosy would help to reduce cases of the disease in Brazil, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Birmingham. [More]
Mathematical modeling could lead to better ways of testing cosmetic, consumer products

Mathematical modeling could lead to better ways of testing cosmetic, consumer products

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy are presenting collaborative research on the use of mathematical methods for understanding the transportation of chemical compounds in biological tissues, like the skin. [More]
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