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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Metabolic imbalance can trigger respiratory diseases in early childhood

Metabolic imbalance can trigger respiratory diseases in early childhood

An imbalance in our metabolism can trigger inflammatory processes in the body and activate the immune system. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, UFZ researchers have been able to show that this applies even to newborns and children under one year of age, and is correlated with the development of respiratory diseases in early childhood. [More]
Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

The battle against malaria is also a battle against its natural host, the mosquito, which means disrupting the insect's lifecycle is every bit as important as putting nets over beds. Now, an international research team has discovered what attracts mosquitos to lay their eggs in specific places. [More]
Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

A multivalent candidate vaccine elicits broad antibody responses to a range of norovirus strains, including strains not included in the vaccine or previously encountered by participants, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
TB Alliance receives Australian DFAT grant to support late-stage clinical trials of new TB drugs

TB Alliance receives Australian DFAT grant to support late-stage clinical trials of new TB drugs

TB Alliance, a not-for-profit product development partnership with the mission of developing better, faster, and affordable drugs for tuberculosis (TB), has received a grant from the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to support late-stage clinical trials of new TB treatments. [More]
Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

In addition to antiretroviral medications, people with HIV may soon begin receiving a home exercise plan from their doctors, according to a researcher at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

This winter was one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. [More]
Researchers examine why joint infections persist despite standards of care

Researchers examine why joint infections persist despite standards of care

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University and the National Institutes of Health are building on their research which seeks to understand why joint infections persist despite standards of care designed to stop them. [More]
New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

A novel therapy that would allow doctors to turn the body's blood-clotting ability off and on in a more controlled way was about as effective as established anticoagulants in patients undergoing angioplasty but was associated with higher rates of moderate to severe bleeding, according to an analysis of data from a terminated Phase III trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
AIR Louisville to use digital health technology to improve asthma

AIR Louisville to use digital health technology to improve asthma

Today marks the start of AIR Louisville, the first-of-its-kind data-driven collaboration among public, private and philanthropic organizations to use digital health technology to improve asthma. Kentucky has the fourth highest adult asthma prevalence in the US and Louisville consistently ranks among the top 20 "most challenging" cities to live in with asthma. [More]
Two common antibiotic treatments equally effective against MRSA skin infections

Two common antibiotic treatments equally effective against MRSA skin infections

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, have found that two common antibiotic treatments work equally well against bacterial skin infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquired outside of hospital settings. [More]
MSU researchers discover what causes death in children with cerebral malaria

MSU researchers discover what causes death in children with cerebral malaria

Malaria kills a child every minute. While medical researchers have successfully developed effective drugs to kill the malaria parasite, efforts to treat the effects of the disease have not been as successful. But that soon may change. [More]
Transplanted regulatory T cells may help in controlling inflammatory diseases

Transplanted regulatory T cells may help in controlling inflammatory diseases

With a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, a team of researchers - including Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professor Juergen Hahn - will investigate the potential of using transplanted regulatory T cells (Tregs) to reduce inflammation in diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, which currently has no known viable treatment options. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Life science researchers at Virginia Tech have accelerated a game-changing technology that's being used to study one of the planet's most lethal disease-carrying animals. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
Common herpes drug Valacyclovir decreases HIV-1 levels

Common herpes drug Valacyclovir decreases HIV-1 levels

Case Western Reserve researchers are part of an international team that has discovered that a common herpes drug reduces HIV-1 levels — even when patients do not have herpes. [More]
New antibody treatment blocks immune signaling protein crucial to psoriasis

New antibody treatment blocks immune signaling protein crucial to psoriasis

Many patients suffering from psoriasis showed significant recovery after just a single dose of an experimental treatment with a human antibody that blocks an immune signaling protein crucial to the disease, researchers report. [More]
MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators suggests that bariatric surgery can significantly reduce the risk of asthma attacks - also called exacerbations - in obese patients with asthma. [More]
Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that major disruptions in the health care systems in West Africa caused by the Ebola crisis have led to significant decreases in vaccinations for childhood diseases, increasing susceptibility to measles and other vaccine-preventable illnesses. [More]
New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

An extensive database identifying immune traits, such as how immune cell function is regulated at the genetic level in healthy people, is reported by researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators in the journal Cell. [More]
Gottlieb Allergy Count kicks off its first report of 2015

Gottlieb Allergy Count kicks off its first report of 2015

Those in the Midwest with sensitive respiratory systems will find relief beginning Monday, March 16 as the Gottlieb Allergy Count kicks off its first report of 2015. The Gottlieb Allergy Count is the official daily allergy count for the Midwest. [More]
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