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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

About 100 drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other purposes can also prevent the growth of certain bacterial pathogens inside human cells, including those that cause Legionnaires' disease, brucellosis, and Mediterranean spotted fever. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug. The discovery, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also is relevant for other infectious diseases including bacterial infections and tuberculosis. [More]
Iowa researchers develop vaccine to combat dust-mite allergies

Iowa researchers develop vaccine to combat dust-mite allergies

Researchers at the University of Iowa have developed a vaccine that can combat dust-mite allergies by naturally switching the body's immune response. [More]
Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Researchers have identified a potential biomarker for airway obstruction in patients with asthma that not only reflects airflow limitation but also asthma control. [More]
SIV can be entrenched in tissues before virus is detectable in blood plasma

SIV can be entrenched in tissues before virus is detectable in blood plasma

Scientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. [More]
Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. [More]
Researchers develop world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease

Researchers develop world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease

Researchers at Wayne State University have made a fundamental discovery and, in subsequent collaboration with scientists at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LIAI), are one step closer to the goal of developing the world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease - the number one killer in the nation. [More]
Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators have identified a gene that underlies a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory condition in children. Several existing drugs have shown therapeutic potential in laboratory studies, and one is currently being studied in children with the disease, which the researchers named STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI). [More]
Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii, a virulent fungus that has invaded the Pacific Northwest is highly adaptive and warrants global "public health vigilance," according to a study by an international team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute. [More]
Localised inflammation found in eosinophilic otitis media

Localised inflammation found in eosinophilic otitis media

Antigen-specific immunoglobulin E is produced locally in the middle ear mucosa of patients with eosinophilic otitis media, clinical research indicates. [More]
Interaction between 2 proteins can be responsible for allergic asthma after eating infected fruit

Interaction between 2 proteins can be responsible for allergic asthma after eating infected fruit

Researchers at the UPM suggest that the interaction between two proteins can be the responsible for the allergic asthma episodes after eating an infected fruit. [More]
NIH-funded study identifies genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis

NIH-funded study identifies genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis

Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory disease characterized by high levels of immune cells called eosinophils in the esophagus. [More]
New research opens up potential new therapeutic targets for hard-to-treat food allergy

New research opens up potential new therapeutic targets for hard-to-treat food allergy

New research in Nature Genetics identifies a novel genetic and molecular pathway in the esophagus that causes eosinophillic esophagitis (EoE), opening up potential new therapeutic strategies for an enigmatic and hard-to-treat food allergy. [More]
HIV detected in Mississippi baby after apparent cure

HIV detected in Mississippi baby after apparent cure

In November 2013, it was reported that an infant (known as the “Mississippi baby”) had been in prolonged remission from HIV and was apparently cured. However, after 2 years without taking antiretroviral therapy and having no evidence of the virus, the child now has detectable levels of HIV. [More]
Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

The child known as the "Mississippi baby"-an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall-now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. [More]
Researchers address under-representation of racial/ethnic groups in HIV medical research

Researchers address under-representation of racial/ethnic groups in HIV medical research

A New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) research team found that a social/behavioral intervention vastly increased the number of African American and Latino individuals living with HIV/AIDS who enrolled in HIV/AIDS medical studies. [More]
Allergy & Asthma Network, ALAA to increase awareness on life-threatening latex allergies

Allergy & Asthma Network, ALAA to increase awareness on life-threatening latex allergies

Allergy & Asthma Network, a leading nonprofit patient education organization, is pleased to announce that its Anaphylaxis Community Expert (ACE) volunteer program is partnering with the American Latex Allergy Association (ALAA) to increase awareness about life-threatening latex allergies. [More]
New diagnostic procedure helps differentiate psoriasis from eczema

New diagnostic procedure helps differentiate psoriasis from eczema

In some patients, the chronic inflammatory skin diseases psoriasis* and eczema** are similar in appearance. Up to now, dermatologists have therefore had to base their decision on which treatment should be selected on their own experience and an examination of tissue samples. [More]