Allergy News and Research RSS Feed - Allergy News and Research

The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Study: Pregnant women need to avoid antibiotics to prevent asthma development in children

Study: Pregnant women need to avoid antibiotics to prevent asthma development in children

Getting sick when you're pregnant is especially difficult, but women whose children are at risk for developing asthma should avoid antibiotics, according to a new study. [More]
New article shows how marijuana can act as an allergen

New article shows how marijuana can act as an allergen

Growing up, you may have been given reasons for not smoking marijuana. What you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause allergic responses. [More]
Researchers reveal how bacterial molecule controls the body's response to TB infection

Researchers reveal how bacterial molecule controls the body's response to TB infection

The cascade of events leading to bacterial infection and the immune response is mostly understood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to the bacteria that causes tuberculosis have remained a mystery — until now. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have now uncovered how a bacterial molecule controls the body's response to TB infection and suggest that adjusting the level of this of this molecule may be a new way to treat the disease. [More]
Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

A major hurdle to curing people of HIV infection is the way the virus hides in a reservoir composed primarily of dormant immune cells. [More]
CEGIR launches patient contact registry for people with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases

CEGIR launches patient contact registry for people with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases

To coincide with Rare Disease Day 2015, the Consortium of Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease Researchers today launched a patient contact registry for individuals with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGID), a group of rare diseases. [More]
Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

After marijuana and alcohol, the most commonly abused drugs by those over the age of 14 are prescription and over-the-counter medications. [More]
NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection. [More]
UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

Current peanut allergy tests are not very reliable when it comes to diagnosing the severity of an individual's allergic reaction, which can range from hives to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. [More]
New research reveals that HIV latency is controlled by the virus itself

New research reveals that HIV latency is controlled by the virus itself

New research from the Gladstone Institutes for the first time provides strong evidence that HIV latency is controlled not by infected host cells, but by the virus itself. This fundamentally changes how scientists perceive latency, presenting it as an evolutionarily advantageous phenomenon rather than a biological accident. [More]
Genomics researchers discover novel gene variants in childhood CVID

Genomics researchers discover novel gene variants in childhood CVID

Genomics researchers analyzing a rare, serious immunodeficiency disease in children have discovered links to a gene crucial to the body's defense against infections. The finding may represent an inviting target for drugs to treat common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). [More]
New study identifies genetic link to peanut allergy

New study identifies genetic link to peanut allergy

Researchers have pinpointed a region in the human genome associated with peanut allergy in U.S. children, offering strong evidence that genes can play a role in the development of food allergies. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls who live in rural areas are more likely than their male counterparts to have undiagnosed asthma, and they often are at a higher risk of depression, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. [More]
Study shows how financial incentives can influence some HIV-positive patients in clinical settings

Study shows how financial incentives can influence some HIV-positive patients in clinical settings

A new study by the HIV Prevention Trials Network shows that some HIV-positive patients were motivated by financial incentives to take their HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication regularly and maintain control of their HIV - enhancing their own health benefits and reducing the chance of passing the virus on to others. [More]
Changes to DNA sequence associated with peanut allergy

Changes to DNA sequence associated with peanut allergy

Research funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests that changes in a small region of chromosome 6 are risk factors for peanut allergy in U.S. children of European descent. The genetic risk area is located among two tightly linked genes that regulate the presentation of allergens and microbial products to the immune system. This study is the first to use a genome-wide screening approach in patients with well-defined food allergy to identify risks for peanut allergy. [More]
Peanut consumption in infancy prevents allergy in kids who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy

Peanut consumption in infancy prevents allergy in kids who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy

A new study reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrates that consumption of a peanut-containing snack by infants who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy prevents the subsequent development of allergy. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim presents Phase III data for tiotropium at 2015 AAAAI Annual Meeting

Boehringer Ingelheim presents Phase III data for tiotropium at 2015 AAAAI Annual Meeting

Boehringer Ingelheim today presented data on investigational tiotropium delivered via Respimat inhaler from five Phase III trials from the UniTinA-asthma program at the 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting in Houston, Texas. [More]
Henry Ford researchers say that breastfeeding influences baby's immune system development

Henry Ford researchers say that breastfeeding influences baby's immune system development

Henry Ford Hospital researchers say that breastfeeding and other factors influence a baby's immune system development and susceptibility to allergies and asthma by what's in their gut. [More]
Epigenome-wide association study helps discover genes linked to allergies and asthma

Epigenome-wide association study helps discover genes linked to allergies and asthma

Researchers from Canada, the UK, Sweden and the US have discovered more than 30 genes that strongly affect an antibody involved in allergies and asthma. Some of the genes could provide targets for drugs to treat those conditions, according to the international team's study, published online in Nature on Feb. 18. [More]
HIV Prevention Trials Network launches two phase 2 studies to evaluate new HIV drugs

HIV Prevention Trials Network launches two phase 2 studies to evaluate new HIV drugs

The HIV Prevention Trials Network has launched two new phase 2 studies, HPTN 076 and HPTN 077, which are designed to evaluate new drugs to protect people from getting infected with HIV. [More]