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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Findings may help researchers develop future interventions to prevent malaria

Findings may help researchers develop future interventions to prevent malaria

According to a study published today in PLOS Pathogens, children who live in regions of the world where malaria is common can mount an immune response to infection with malaria parasites that may enable them to avoid repeated bouts of high fever and illness and partially control the growth of malaria parasites in their bloodstream. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]

Wolters Kluwer Health launches dental drug interactions screening tool with Medication Safety Check feature

Wolters Kluwer Health, a leading global provider of information for healthcare professionals and students, announced today that it has launched an enhanced dental drug interactions screening tool with a new Medication Safety Check feature, allowing professionals to screen for drug-drug, drug-allergy, and duplicate therapy interactions and review safe medication options. [More]
BRI scientists receive grant to study new approach to blocking metastatic breast cancer

BRI scientists receive grant to study new approach to blocking metastatic breast cancer

Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason recently received a grant to research how blocking a particular molecule in metastatic breast cancer reduces both the growth of primary tumors and the number of lung metastases. [More]

Study: Maternal diet could have impact on food allergy in later life of children

About 20 million Europeans are subject to food allergies. Now scientists are looking at these allergies in new ways. It involves the food industry in its work and pays special attention to the link between early diets and allergy in later life. Clare Mills, professor of allergy in the university's Institute of Inflammation and Repair, at the University of Manchester, UK, is the coordinator of iFAAM. [More]
Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Rural residents who commonly seek treatment for advanced stages of colorectal cancer have been thought to lack access to cancer screening and adjuvant therapy. ... Several theories have been postulated to explain these findings, some of which include low socioeconomic status, lower educational attainment, lack of insurance coverage, underinsurance, and travel distance to health care facilities. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

SWHR co-sponsors National Institutes of Health Forum on microbiome and autoimmunity

The Society for Women's Health Research (SWHR®), the leading voice on the study of the biological differences between women and men, is co-sponsoring the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Forum on the Microbiome and Autoimmunity on Thursday, April 24, at the NIH in Bethesda, Md. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]

Allergist says people allergic to multiple trees may have tough allergy this spring

The polar vortex may be on its way out, but it's certainly leaving its footprints behind. As spring rolls in, people allergic to multiple trees may have a tough allergy season - a consequence of the cold winter, says Mark Dykewicz, M.D., professor of allergy and immunology at Saint Louis University. [More]
UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

The global experts who study the deadliest infectious diseases recognized the contributions of Frederick A. Murphy and Thomas G. Ksiazek, professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch, with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 6th annual International Symposium on Filoviruses. The filoviruses include Ebola and Marburg viruses that cause death in 50 to 90 percent of people infected. The current outbreak of Ebola virus raging in West Africa has caused more than 100 deaths so far. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]
Researchers develop more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma

Researchers develop more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma. [More]
Johnson & Johnson's sales increase 3.5% to $18.1 billion in first quarter 2014

Johnson & Johnson's sales increase 3.5% to $18.1 billion in first quarter 2014

Johnson & Johnson today announced sales of $18.1 billion for the first quarter of 2014, an increase of 3.5% as compared to the first quarter of 2013. Operational results increased 5.3% and the negative impact of currency was 1.8%. Domestic sales increased 2.2%. International sales increased 4.5%, reflecting operational growth of 7.9% and a negative currency impact of 3.4%. [More]

DesignMedix receives $3 million NIH grant to develop new anti-malarial drug

DesignMedix, Inc., a biotech startup with ties to Portland State University, received a grant for almost $3 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue development and manufacture of a new anti-malarial drug. [More]

Scientists discover how bacterium Y. pestis overwhelms lungs to cause pneumonic plague

​Northwestern Medicine scientists are continuing to unravel the molecular changes that underlie one of the world's deadliest and most infamous respiratory infections. [More]

Researchers discover tumor suppressor gene folliculin essential to normal lung function in BHD patients

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. [More]

Researchers discover mechanism that control normal lung function in patients with BHD syndrome

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. Folliculin's absence or mutated state has a cascading effect that leads to deteriorated lung integrity and an impairment of lung function, as reported in their findings in the current issue of Cell Reports. [More]
NextGen earns ONC 2014 Edition criteria certification for Emergency Department Solution

NextGen earns ONC 2014 Edition criteria certification for Emergency Department Solution

NextGen Healthcare Information Systems, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Quality Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: QSII) and a leading provider of healthcare information systems and connectivity solutions, announced today that NextGen® Emergency Department Solution version 6.0 is compliant with the ONC 2014 Edition criteria and was certified as an electronic health record (EHR) Module on March 7, 2014 by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®), an ONC-ACB, in accordance with the applicable Hospital certification criteria adopted by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. [More]

Genkyotex’s GKT137831 reverses lung fibrosis in new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Genkyotex, the leading developer of selective NOX enzyme inhibitors, announced today the publication of data showing that GKT137831, a first in class NOX1 and 4 inhibitor, was able to reverse lung fibrosis associated with aging in a new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. [More]