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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Soligenix completes enrolment in SGX942 Phase 2 trial for oral mucositis in cancer patients

Soligenix completes enrolment in SGX942 Phase 2 trial for oral mucositis in cancer patients

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today it has completed enrollment of the additional subjects, as directed by the Data Review Committee (DRC) earlier this year, into the company's Phase 2 study for SGX942. [More]
Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have revealed that HIV does not cause AIDS by the virus's direct effect on the host's immune cells, but rather through the cells' lethal influence on one another. [More]
Soligenix obtains additional funding from NIAID to advance development of OrbeShield for GI ARS treatment

Soligenix obtains additional funding from NIAID to advance development of OrbeShield for GI ARS treatment

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has exercised its option to advance preclinical development of OrbeShield (oral beclomethasone 17,21-dipropionate or oral BDP). [More]
Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD with 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation

Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD with 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation

Based on its recent analysis of the intravenous drug delivery devices market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) with the 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation. The company's BD Intelliport System is the industry's first medication management system designed to overcome long-standing challenges associated with the administration of manual intravenous bolus injections. [More]
Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

An oral cholera vaccine that is in short supply could treat more people and save more lives in crisis situations, if one dose were dispensed instead of the recommended two, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Researchers discover new hepatitis A-like virus in seals

Researchers discover new hepatitis A-like virus in seals

Scientists in the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered a new virus in seals that is the closest known relative of the human hepatitis A virus. The finding provides new clues on the emergence of hepatitis A. [More]
Significant divide can exist between patients and physicians about same medical terms

Significant divide can exist between patients and physicians about same medical terms

Few things are more stressful than dealing with a sick child. From discussing treatment with a pediatrician to complying with day care policies, a parent must consider many factors when making a decision about their child's health. Now, a recent study from the University of Missouri and the University of Michigan is shedding light on the significant divide that can exist between patients and physicians about the same terminology--especially when it comes to discussing "pink eye," a particular flashpoint in childcare. [More]
Caring for young children with eczema

Caring for young children with eczema

The excitement of a newborn baby turned to worry when a few weeks after Lorenzo Torres-Ramirez was born his parents started to notice red spots on his face. [More]
Novel synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against MERS virus in animal study

Novel synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against MERS virus in animal study

A novel synthetic DNA vaccine can, for the first time, induce protective immunity against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus in animal species, reported researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted the company's resubmission of its Supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for BOTOX (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of adults with lower limb (involving ankle and toe muscles) spasticity in adults. [More]
Discovery provides new insights into how asthma may be caused

Discovery provides new insights into how asthma may be caused

Researchers from the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, working with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Genentech, have discovered new insights into how asthma may be caused, by identifying three distinct groups of asthma patients characterised by the activity of different genes in an individual's airways. [More]
Experimental MERS-CoV vaccine shows promise in monkeys and camels

Experimental MERS-CoV vaccine shows promise in monkeys and camels

National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues report that an experimental vaccine given six weeks before exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) fully protects rhesus macaques from disease. The vaccine also generated potentially protective MERS-CoV antibodies in blood drawn from vaccinated camels. [More]
NIAID exercises option to advance development of Soligenix's heat stabilized ricin toxin vaccine

NIAID exercises option to advance development of Soligenix's heat stabilized ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has exercised its option to advance the development of Soligenix's heat stabilized ricin toxin vaccine, RiVax. [More]
NIH grants Clinical and Translational Science Award to UC San Diego

NIH grants Clinical and Translational Science Award to UC San Diego

The Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI) at University of California, San Diego has received a five-year Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) for approximately $52 million from the National Center for Advancing Translational Science, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

There may be two new ways to fight AIDS -- using a heat shock protein or a small molecule - to attack fibrils in semen associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during the initial phases of infection, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers report increasing disparities between resource inputs, outcomes in biomedical research

Researchers report increasing disparities between resource inputs, outcomes in biomedical research

As more money has been spent on biomedical research in the United States over the past 50 years, there has been diminished return on investment in terms of life expectancy gains and new drug approvals, two Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say. [More]
Nitrogen oxides affect pollen of common ragweed plant

Nitrogen oxides affect pollen of common ragweed plant

Pollen of the common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) has higher concentrations of allergen when the plant is exposed to NO2 exhaust gases, according to findings of scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München. In addition, the study published in the journal 'Plant, Cell & Environment' indicates the presence of a possible new allergen in the plant. [More]
Researchers develop new genomic data set on Lassa virus

Researchers develop new genomic data set on Lassa virus

An international team of researchers has developed the largest genomic data set in the world on Lassa virus (LASV). [More]
PHIV children may lack immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella despite vaccination

PHIV children may lack immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella despite vaccination

Between one-third and one-half of individuals in the United States who were infected with HIV around the time of birth may not have sufficient immunity to ward off measles, mumps, and rubella--even though they may have been vaccinated against these diseases. [More]
Scientists reveal how non-allergenic pollen mediators can increase allergic reactions

Scientists reveal how non-allergenic pollen mediators can increase allergic reactions

Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and TU München discovered a new mechanism how non-allergenic pollen mediators can enhance allergic reactions. Especially the so-called B cells play a critical role in this process. The results were recently published in the Journal 'Allergy' and might lead to new approaches for therapies. [More]
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