Altitude Sickness News and Research RSS Feed - Altitude Sickness News and Research

GlassesOff mobile app improves visual acuity, image processing speed in IAF pilots

GlassesOff mobile app improves visual acuity, image processing speed in IAF pilots

GlassesOff Inc. (OTCBB: GLSO) today announced that statistically significant interim results from a study commissioned by the Israeli Air Force (IAF) demonstrated significant improvements in critical visual functions of IAF pilots through the use of the GlassesOff mobile app. [More]
Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Planning to travel outside the U.S. this holiday season? Check with your primary care provider or travel clinic when you book your flight. [More]
NIH-funded clinical trial aims to restore vision in people who have lost vision due to IIH

NIH-funded clinical trial aims to restore vision in people who have lost vision due to IIH

In an NIH-funded clinical trial, led at Saint Louis University by professor of ophthalmology Sophia Chung, M.D., researchers aim to bring sight back to those who have lost vision due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension. [More]
Researchers identify possible way to prevent headaches of climbers

Researchers identify possible way to prevent headaches of climbers

By monitoring blood flow in the brains of six climbers scaling Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, German medical researchers have identified a possible way to prevent the headaches that are a common feature of altitude sickness. This work appears in the latest issue of JNIRS—Journal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy. [More]
Brain effects of high-altitude sickness retained long term

Brain effects of high-altitude sickness retained long term

Mountaineers who experience high-altitude cerebral edema often retain traces of the bleed in their brains for many years afterward, show study findings. [More]
Brain microhemorrhages more common among high altitude cerebral edema survivors

Brain microhemorrhages more common among high altitude cerebral edema survivors

New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research shows that mountain climbers who experience a certain type of high altitude sickness have traces of bleeding in the brain years after the initial incident, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). [More]
Ten tips to avoid or treat common medical problems in the outdoors

Ten tips to avoid or treat common medical problems in the outdoors

"Good fortune favors the well prepared," says Paul S. Auerbach, MD, a founder and past President of the Wilderness Medical Society and editor of Wilderness Medicine, 6th Edition, recently published by Elsevier. With some advance reading, individuals planning vacations or outdoor excursions can become familiar with adverse situations and be prepared to handle them. [More]
Ibuprofen may be used effectively for altitude sickness: Study

Ibuprofen may be used effectively for altitude sickness: Study

Altitude sickness manifests by symptoms including a headache, fatigue, dizziness and sometimes nausea and vomiting. In addition, patients most likely also feel like they are working harder to breathe, like they are constantly trying to catch their breath. It normally takes days to weeks to fully acclimate to a higher altitude. It affects between 25 percent and 40 percent of the population and can be debilitating. [More]
Risk factors for acute mountain sickness

Risk factors for acute mountain sickness

When the Mountains Call. . . don't climb too fast! Lack of acclimatization and excessively rapid ascent are the main risk factors for acute mountain sickness, as Kai Schommer and Peter B-rtsch explain in this issue of Deutsches -rzteblatt International [More]
Altitude Research Center receives Department of Defense grant to prevent AMS in soldiers

Altitude Research Center receives Department of Defense grant to prevent AMS in soldiers

As the American military rushes to confront adversaries in some of the world's highest mountain ranges, the Department of Defense is giving $4 million to the Altitude Research Center at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to develop revolutionary ways to combat high altitude sickness in soldiers, sailors and marines. [More]
Trekkers and climbers face high risk for Acute Mountain Sickness

Trekkers and climbers face high risk for Acute Mountain Sickness

Climbers of high peaks such as Mount Kilimanjaro are at high risk for Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). Trekkers should not ignore AMS warning signs, which can progress to more serious medical outcomes. [More]
Researchers create artificial RNA inhibitor to block excess blood cells formation

Researchers create artificial RNA inhibitor to block excess blood cells formation

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered a key step in the creation of new red blood cells in an animal study.They found that a tiny fragment of ribonucleic acid (RNA), a chemical cousin of DNA, prompts stem cells to mature into red blood cells. The researchers also created an artificial RNA inhibitor to block this process. [More]
RCSI scientists make breakthrough in understanding human adaptation to high altitude environments

RCSI scientists make breakthrough in understanding human adaptation to high altitude environments

A group of top international scientists including geneticists from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland has made a breakthrough in understanding human adaptation to high altitude environments. [More]
Gene variant linked to ability of Tibetans to cope with low-oxygen conditions identified

Gene variant linked to ability of Tibetans to cope with low-oxygen conditions identified

A new study pinpoints the genetic changes that enable Tibetans to thrive at altitudes where others get sick. [More]
Penn Medicine experts available to offer medical insight and commentary during 2010 Winter Olympics

Penn Medicine experts available to offer medical insight and commentary during 2010 Winter Olympics

Experts from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine are available to offer expert medical insight and commentary during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver on issues ranging from the effects of performance enhancing drugs to concerns about the spread of novel H1N1, head trauma and more. [More]
Sildenafil could become a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Sildenafil could become a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

A new study appears to have found another use for the drug Viagra other than for treating problems such as erectile dysfunction. [More]

Functional magnetic resonance imaging aids study of brain development

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a powerful noninvasive tool for studying brain activity in both humans and experimental animals. [More]

High altitude pulmonary oedema

Experts at the University are studying an illness known as HAPE (high altitude pulmonary oedema), which causes fluid to build up in the lungs can and can occur from as low as 2,500 metres, affecting people of all age groups and fitness levels. [More]

It may be 'altitude sickness' rather than jet lag but you still feel rotten

A study has revealed that many of the effects of long-distance flight which are usually put down to jet lag and fatigue, may in fact be altitude sickness. [More]
Wurst protein plays a decisive role in breathing

Wurst protein plays a decisive role in breathing

A newly discovered transmembrane protein called "Wurst" (sausage) appears to play a decisive role in breathing ? possibly in all animals, from flies to human beings. [More]