Amblyopia News and Research RSS Feed - Amblyopia News and Research

UofL ophthalmic scientist receives grant for improving recovery from amblyopia

UofL ophthalmic scientist receives grant for improving recovery from amblyopia

Aaron W. McGee, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, has received the Disney Award for Amblyopia Research in the amount of $100,000 from Research to Prevent Blindness. [More]
Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) represent the latest in premium lens technology. They are tiny, artificial lenses that are implanted into the eye during a cataract or lens replacement procedure. [More]
Understanding brain circuit development: an interview with Dr Hollis Cline

Understanding brain circuit development: an interview with Dr Hollis Cline

There's a tremendous amount known about brain circuit development. Our work was inspired by experiments that were done over 50 years ago by scientists at Harvard University, Hubel and Wiesel. They received a Nobel Prize for their work and have inspired many additional experiments over the last 50 or 60 years. [More]
New UAB study shows connection between ADHD and vision problems in children

New UAB study shows connection between ADHD and vision problems in children

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most frequently encountered neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, and a new study from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham recently published in Optometry and Vision Science shows a relationship between ADHD and vision impairments in children. [More]
New treatment for adults with lazy eye one step closer to reality

New treatment for adults with lazy eye one step closer to reality

A new treatment for adults with lazy eye, a condition previously thought to be treatable only in childhood, is one step closer as a result of research from the University of Waterloo in Canada and Sun Yat-sen University in China. [More]
Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken in the U.S. confirms that the incidence of childhood myopia among American children has more than doubled over the last 50 years. The findings echo a troubling trend among adults and children in Asia, where 90 percent or more of the population have been diagnosed with myopia, up from 10 to 20 percent 60 years ago. [More]

Study identifies amblyopia as key factor for poor reading in school-age children

Children with amblyopia, commonly known as "lazy eye," may have impaired ocular motor function. This can result in difficulties in activities for which sequential eye movements are important, such as reading. [More]
Study: Programmable electronic glasses help improve vision in children diagnosed with lazy eye

Study: Programmable electronic glasses help improve vision in children diagnosed with lazy eye

A new study on lazy eye found that programmable electronic glasses help improve vision in children just as well as the more traditional treatment using eye patches. This "digital patch" is the first new effective treatment for lazy eye in half a century. Results from the first U.S. trial of this device will be presented at AAO 2015, the 119th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
3-D model of animal brain provides more complete picture of brain's connectivity

3-D model of animal brain provides more complete picture of brain's connectivity

The animal brain is so complex, it would take a supercomputer and vast amounts of data to create a detailed 3-D model of the billions of neurons that power it. [More]
New approaches to treating amblyopia

New approaches to treating amblyopia

Amblyopia, commonly known as "lazy-eye," has been classically treated by patching the strong eye to force the weaker eye to be used. However, the concept of binocular dysfunction, in which the brain suppresses the image from the weaker eye in favor of the stronger eye, has motivated new approaches to amblyopia treatment. [More]
Laser eye surgery: a glimpse into the future - An interview with Professor Dan Reinstein

Laser eye surgery: a glimpse into the future - An interview with Professor Dan Reinstein

LASIK (Laser In Situ Keratomileusis) creates a hinged flap with a microkeratome and evaporating corneal tissue under the flap with an excimer laser. However, the concept that refractive error could be corrected by sculpting corneal stromal tissue to change corneal curvature was the brainchild of Jose Ignacio Barraquer Moner in 1948. [More]
New research may aid in treatment of vision problems like lazy eye

New research may aid in treatment of vision problems like lazy eye

If you have two working eyes, you are live streaming two images of the world into your brain. Your brain combines the two to produce a view of the world that appears as though you had a single eye -- like the Cyclops from Greek mythology. [More]
Benefit and harm of vision screening in preschool-aged children still unclear

Benefit and harm of vision screening in preschool-aged children still unclear

It remains unclear whether a special ophthalmological examination of all children younger than 6 years (and potential follow-up treatments) would reduce the frequency and severity of visual impairment (amblyopia) in the population. An update search conducted for a benefit assessment of the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care from 2008 identified no new screening study. [More]

Extremely poor vision can be caused by strabismus in early childhood

Extremely poor vision can be caused by strabismus in early childhood or by a displaced optical axis. Amblyopia is caused not by organic damage to the eyes but by the brain incorrectly fitting together the images the eyes provide. [More]
UC Irvine study shows youthful vigor can be restored to adult brains

UC Irvine study shows youthful vigor can be restored to adult brains

They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. The same can be said of the adult brain. Its connections are hard to change, while in children, novel experiences rapidly mold new connections during critical periods of brain development. [More]

Report describes effectiveness of new computer-based vision-screening test for kids

Many eye disorders in young children are asymptomatic and may remain undetected without testing. Since effective treatments are available for many of those conditions, early identification and intervention are critical to prevent potentially permanent vision problems. [More]
Dry eye strikes most often in spring

Dry eye strikes most often in spring

New ophthalmology research from the University of Miami shows that dry eye - the little understood culprit behind red, watery, gritty feeling eyes - strikes most often in spring, just as airborne allergens are surging. [More]
Expert panel recommends vision health screening in preschool-aged children

Expert panel recommends vision health screening in preschool-aged children

All children should undergo vision health screening between age 36 and 72 months--preferably every year--using evidence-based test methods and with effective referral and follow-up, according to recommendations published in the January issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. [More]
Surgical treatment of strabismus can be carried out at any age

Surgical treatment of strabismus can be carried out at any age

Around four per cent of all newborn children have a squint. In about 50 per cent of cases, this can be corrected with appropriate glasses, however the other half require treatment for their squint and in some cases even squint surgery. [More]
Researchers demonstrate neuronal effects of novel treatment method for neurological diseases

Researchers demonstrate neuronal effects of novel treatment method for neurological diseases

Tinnitus, migraine, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's: all these are examples of diseases with neurological causes, the treatment and study of which is more and more frequently being carried out by means of magnetic stimulation of the brain. However, the method's precise mechanisms of action have not, as yet, been fully understood. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement