Amniotic Fluid News and Research RSS Feed - Amniotic Fluid News and Research

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Scientists from the University of Cambridge and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have discovered that children who later develop autism are exposed to elevated levels of steroid hormones (for example testosterone, progesterone and cortisol) in the womb. The finding may help explain why autism is more common in males than females, but should not be used to screen for the condition. [More]
New approach to detect chromosomal abnormalities without harm to mother or fetus

New approach to detect chromosomal abnormalities without harm to mother or fetus

Chromosomal abnormalities that result in birth defects and genetic disorders like Down syndrome remain a significant health burden in the United States and throughout the world, with some current prenatal screening procedures invasive and a potential risk to mother and unborn child. [More]
Managing pregnancy-related complications: an interview with Dr. Mark Zakowski

Managing pregnancy-related complications: an interview with Dr. Mark Zakowski

Pregnancy-related mortality has increased over the last 25 years. Ten years ago the top three pregnancy-related mortality diagnoses were hemorrhage, preeclampsia, and embolism (includes thrombotic and amniotic). [More]
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Cardiac arrest during childbirth may be 2 times more common than previously reported

Cardiac arrest during childbirth may be 2 times more common than previously reported

Although cardiac arrest during childbirth is rare, it may be two times more common than previously reported in the literature, suggests the first large U.S. study on the potentially deadly condition published in the April issue of Anesthesiology. [More]
Specific genes and factors can lead to delays in language development in kids

Specific genes and factors can lead to delays in language development in kids

Boys are at greater risk for delayed language development than girls, according to a new study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. The researchers also found that reading and writing difficulties in the family gave an increased risk. [More]
Researcher seeks best way to obtain parental consent for research regarding newborn resuscitation

Researcher seeks best way to obtain parental consent for research regarding newborn resuscitation

For years, obtaining parental consent for clinical research regarding newborn resuscitation in the delivery room has been a challenge. Now, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is asking new mothers and pregnant women when doctors should seek parental permission to allow medical research related to delivery room treatments. [More]
Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy increase risk of autism in children

Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy increase risk of autism in children

Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders in children, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. [More]
UCLA stem cell researchers track early development of human articular cartilage

UCLA stem cell researchers track early development of human articular cartilage

Stem cell researchers from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have published the first study to identify the origin cells and track the early development of human articular cartilage, providing what could be a new cell source and biological roadmap for therapies to repair cartilage defects and osteoarthritis. These revolutionary therapies could reach clinical trials within three years. [More]
Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

In an article appearing in Medical Hypotheses on September 20, a New York-based physician-researcher from the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine has called for the testing of umbilical cord blood for levels of a growth protein that could help predict an infant's propensity to later develop autism. [More]
Clinical study to investigate effects of prenatal chromosomal abnormalities through microarray analysis

Clinical study to investigate effects of prenatal chromosomal abnormalities through microarray analysis

Reproductive genetics researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) are leading a multicenter prospective clinical study investigating the effects of chromosomal abnormalities (duplicative or missing material) found prenatally through microarray analysis. [More]
Researcher receives $1.58M NIDCR grant to advance research on link between oral bacteria and fetal death

Researcher receives $1.58M NIDCR grant to advance research on link between oral bacteria and fetal death

A new four-year, $1.58 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, will allow a Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researcher to advance her work linking oral bacteria to fetal death. [More]
Research lays foundation for genetic test to identify hip dysplasia in newborns

Research lays foundation for genetic test to identify hip dysplasia in newborns

Research from Thomas Jefferson University is laying the foundation for a genetic test to accurately identify hip dysplasia in newborns so that early intervention can be initiated to promote normal development. [More]
Study: Stem cells can communicate with mature heart cells, form electrical couplings

Study: Stem cells can communicate with mature heart cells, form electrical couplings

Stem cells drawn from amniotic fluid show promise for tissue engineering, but it's important to know what they can and cannot do. A new study by researchers at Rice University and Texas Children's Hospital has shown that these stem cells can communicate with mature heart cells and form electrical couplings with each other similar to those found in heart tissue. [More]
Study investigates new way to treat necrotizing enterocolitis

Study investigates new way to treat necrotizing enterocolitis

Stem cells taken from amniotic fluid were used to restore gut structure and function following intestinal damage in rodents, in new research published in the journal Gut. [More]
Non-invasive prenatal genetic screening: an interview with Dr. Charles Strom, Senior Medical Director, Quest Diagnostics

Non-invasive prenatal genetic screening: an interview with Dr. Charles Strom, Senior Medical Director, Quest Diagnostics

A new category of non-invasive genetic screening tests is gaining a great deal of interest in the medical field – including from Quest Diagnostics -- for its potential to help screen women during pregnancy for genetic abnormalities known as trisomies, the most common of which is Down syndrome. [More]
Risk of preterm birth associated with intra-amniotic debris and shortened cervix

Risk of preterm birth associated with intra-amniotic debris and shortened cervix

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting -, in San Francisco, California, researchers will report findings suggesting an increased risk of early (less than 35 weeks) preterm birth when intra-amniotic debris is present in nulliparous women with a short cervix. [More]
Potential connection between autism and insulin-like growth factor

Potential connection between autism and insulin-like growth factor

A New York-based physician-researcher from Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, best known for his research into fertility and twinning, has uncovered a potential connection between autism and a specific growth protein that could eventually be used as a way to predict an infant's propensity to later develop the disease. [More]
Exposure of human f-tal testicles to bisphenol A reduces testosterone production

Exposure of human f-tal testicles to bisphenol A reduces testosterone production

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound that is included in the composition of plastics and resins. It is used, for example, in the manufacture of food containers such as bottles and babies' feeding bottles. It is also found in the protective films used inside food and drink cans and on till receipts where it used as a discloser. Significant levels of BPA have also been found in human blood, urine, amniotic fluid and placentas. [More]