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Amniotic stem cells promote growth of functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels

Amniotic stem cells promote growth of functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels

Rice University and Texas Children's Hospital scientists are using stem cells from amniotic fluid to promote the growth of robust, functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels. [More]
New microarray-based tool provides fast, reliable assessment of vaginal health

New microarray-based tool provides fast, reliable assessment of vaginal health

A new microarray-based tool, called VaginArray, offers the potential to provide a fast, reliable and low-cost assessment of vaginal health and diagnoses of infections. The research is published ahead of print March 2, in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Maternal exposure to flame-retardants may contribute to preterm births

Maternal exposure to flame-retardants may contribute to preterm births

Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch have determined that maternal exposure to high levels of flame-retardants may be a contributing factor in preterm births. [More]
Medical co-morbidities associated with direct maternal deaths in the UK

Medical co-morbidities associated with direct maternal deaths in the UK

Medical co-morbidities, when women have one or more medical conditions, are found to be an important factor associated with direct maternal deaths, suggests a new study published today (9 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Obstetric care during Ebola epidemic are deeply challenging

Obstetric care during Ebola epidemic are deeply challenging

Obstetric interventions during an Ebola epidemic are deeply challenging say two new commentaries published today (14 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Researchers develop mouse model that reproduces most typical features of Noonan syndrome

Researchers develop mouse model that reproduces most typical features of Noonan syndrome

Noonan syndrome is a rare disease that is characterised by a set of pathologies, including heart, facial and skeletal alterations, pulmonary stenosis, short stature, and a greater incidence of haematological problems (mainly juvenile myeloid leukaemia, or childhood leukaemia). [More]
CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Scientists from the University of Cambridge and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have discovered that children who later develop autism are exposed to elevated levels of steroid hormones (for example testosterone, progesterone and cortisol) in the womb. The finding may help explain why autism is more common in males than females, but should not be used to screen for the condition. [More]
New approach to detect chromosomal abnormalities without harm to mother or fetus

New approach to detect chromosomal abnormalities without harm to mother or fetus

Chromosomal abnormalities that result in birth defects and genetic disorders like Down syndrome remain a significant health burden in the United States and throughout the world, with some current prenatal screening procedures invasive and a potential risk to mother and unborn child. [More]
Managing pregnancy-related complications: an interview with Dr. Mark Zakowski

Managing pregnancy-related complications: an interview with Dr. Mark Zakowski

Pregnancy-related mortality has increased over the last 25 years. Ten years ago the top three pregnancy-related mortality diagnoses were hemorrhage, preeclampsia, and embolism (includes thrombotic and amniotic). [More]
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Cardiac arrest during childbirth may be 2 times more common than previously reported

Cardiac arrest during childbirth may be 2 times more common than previously reported

Although cardiac arrest during childbirth is rare, it may be two times more common than previously reported in the literature, suggests the first large U.S. study on the potentially deadly condition published in the April issue of Anesthesiology. [More]
Specific genes and factors can lead to delays in language development in kids

Specific genes and factors can lead to delays in language development in kids

Boys are at greater risk for delayed language development than girls, according to a new study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. The researchers also found that reading and writing difficulties in the family gave an increased risk. [More]
Researcher seeks best way to obtain parental consent for research regarding newborn resuscitation

Researcher seeks best way to obtain parental consent for research regarding newborn resuscitation

For years, obtaining parental consent for clinical research regarding newborn resuscitation in the delivery room has been a challenge. Now, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is asking new mothers and pregnant women when doctors should seek parental permission to allow medical research related to delivery room treatments. [More]
Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy increase risk of autism in children

Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy increase risk of autism in children

Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders in children, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. [More]
UCLA stem cell researchers track early development of human articular cartilage

UCLA stem cell researchers track early development of human articular cartilage

Stem cell researchers from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have published the first study to identify the origin cells and track the early development of human articular cartilage, providing what could be a new cell source and biological roadmap for therapies to repair cartilage defects and osteoarthritis. These revolutionary therapies could reach clinical trials within three years. [More]
Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

In an article appearing in Medical Hypotheses on September 20, a New York-based physician-researcher from the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine has called for the testing of umbilical cord blood for levels of a growth protein that could help predict an infant's propensity to later develop autism. [More]
Clinical study to investigate effects of prenatal chromosomal abnormalities through microarray analysis

Clinical study to investigate effects of prenatal chromosomal abnormalities through microarray analysis

Reproductive genetics researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) are leading a multicenter prospective clinical study investigating the effects of chromosomal abnormalities (duplicative or missing material) found prenatally through microarray analysis. [More]
Researcher receives $1.58M NIDCR grant to advance research on link between oral bacteria and fetal death

Researcher receives $1.58M NIDCR grant to advance research on link between oral bacteria and fetal death

A new four-year, $1.58 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, will allow a Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researcher to advance her work linking oral bacteria to fetal death. [More]
Research lays foundation for genetic test to identify hip dysplasia in newborns

Research lays foundation for genetic test to identify hip dysplasia in newborns

Research from Thomas Jefferson University is laying the foundation for a genetic test to accurately identify hip dysplasia in newborns so that early intervention can be initiated to promote normal development. [More]
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