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Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a second-generation antibiotic that shows early effectiveness against common bacterial infections that pose a serious health threat to children and adults. [More]
International travelers bring multidrug-resistant shigellosis to the US

International travelers bring multidrug-resistant shigellosis to the US

International travelers are bringing a multidrug-resistant intestinal illness to the United States and spreading it to others who have not traveled, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [More]
New article highlights the problem of antibiotic use in lab experiments

New article highlights the problem of antibiotic use in lab experiments

Scientists should reduce antibiotic use in lab experiments - according to a researcher at the University of East Anglia. [More]
Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists from the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia have discovered how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves and others in the gut from antibiotics. [More]
Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

In Mexico the sale of antibiotics for human consumption is controlled to prevent misuse, although in the veterinary sector failure in the implementation of the Official Mexican Standard NOM-064-ZOO-2000, "Guidelines for veterinarian products prescription", has prompted common bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp to become resistant to regular drugs such as streptomycin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, gentamicin, and tetracycline as a result of excess drug use. [More]
Study results may lead to new approach for treatment of chronic ear infections in children

Study results may lead to new approach for treatment of chronic ear infections in children

Researchers from the University of Southern California and the Oak Crest Institute of Science have discovered the link between antibiotics and bacterial biofilm formation leading to chronic lung, sinus and ear infections. The study results, published in the current issue of PLOS ONE, illustrate how bacterial biofilms can actually thrive, rather than decrease, when given low doses of antibiotics. [More]
Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat effectiveness, even against so-called "superbugs." [More]
Children hospitalized for pneumonia have similar outcomes with big gun antibiotics or penicillin

Children hospitalized for pneumonia have similar outcomes with big gun antibiotics or penicillin

Children hospitalized for pneumonia have similar outcomes, including length of stay and costs, regardless of whether they are treated with "big gun" antibiotics such as ceftriaxone or cefotaxime or more narrowly focused antibiotics such as ampicillin or penicillin, according to a Vanderbilt study published in Pediatrics. [More]
Study reveals that Hudson River polluted with antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Study reveals that Hudson River polluted with antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The risk of catching some nasty germ in the Hudson River just started looking nastier. Disease-causing microbes have long been found swimming there, but now researchers have documented antibiotic-resistant strains in specific spots, from the Tappan Zee Bridge to lower Manhattan. [More]
Scientists uncover easy strategies to prevent harmful side-effects of antibiotics responses

Scientists uncover easy strategies to prevent harmful side-effects of antibiotics responses

A team of scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has discovered why long-term treatment with many common antibiotics can cause harmful side effects-and they have uncovered two easy strategies that could help prevent these dangerous responses. [More]
Treating bacteria with silver compounds boosts efficacy of old antibiotics

Treating bacteria with silver compounds boosts efficacy of old antibiotics

Slipping bacteria some silver could give old antibiotics new life, scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University reported June 19 in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Drug targeting of phages could offer a potential new path to mitigate antibiotic resistance

Drug targeting of phages could offer a potential new path to mitigate antibiotic resistance

Bacteria in the gut that are under attack by antibiotics have allies no one had anticipated, a team of Wyss Institute scientists has found. Gut viruses that usually commandeer the bacteria, it turns out, enable them to survive the antibiotic onslaught, most likely by handing them genes that help them withstand the drug. [More]
Study reveals humans are passing antibiotic resistance to wildlife in protected areas

Study reveals humans are passing antibiotic resistance to wildlife in protected areas

A team of Virginia Tech researchers has discovered that humans are passing antibiotic resistance to wildlife, especially in protected areas where numbers of humans are limited. [More]
Specific therapy may cut pneumonia mortality in HIV babies

Specific therapy may cut pneumonia mortality in HIV babies

The high mortality rate associated with acute severe pneumonia-related respiratory failure in infants exposed to or infected with HIV can be reduced to 30% if a treatment plan involving antibiotics, ventilation, and fluid restriction is used, researchers report. [More]

Gal-pagos reptiles living near human settlements harbor antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Land and marine iguanas and giant tortoises living close to human settlements or tourist sites in the Gal-pagos islands are more likely to harbor antibiotic-resistant bacteria than those living in more remote or protected sites on the islands, researchers report in a new study. [More]
Roads may play a major role in the spread or containment of antibiotic resistant bacteria

Roads may play a major role in the spread or containment of antibiotic resistant bacteria

Antibiotic resistant E. coli was much more prevalent in villages situated along roads than in rural villages located away from roads, which suggests that roads play a major role in the spread or containment of antibiotic resistant bacteria, commonly called superbugs, a new study finds. [More]
Simple ultrasound examination may avoid complex tests for children with urinary tract infection

Simple ultrasound examination may avoid complex tests for children with urinary tract infection

For infants and young children with urinary tract infection seen in the ER, a simple ultrasound examination may avoid the need for more complex x-ray tests, reports a study in the May issue of The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. [More]
Results of study evaluating potential inhibitory effects of PPIs on Plavix presented at ACC 2011

Results of study evaluating potential inhibitory effects of PPIs on Plavix presented at ACC 2011

Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. announced the presentation of new study results, which evaluated the potential inhibitory effects of certain proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on Plavix (clopidogrel bisulfate). The results showed that in healthy subjects, clopidogrel's active metabolite and inhibition of platelet function were reduced less by the co-administration of clopidogrel with dexlansoprazole or lansoprazole, rather than esomeprazole. [More]
Otoscopic exams critical for accurate diagnosis of ear infections in children

Otoscopic exams critical for accurate diagnosis of ear infections in children

Among the findings of an analysis of previous studies regarding ear infections in children are that results from otoscopic exams (an instrument for examining the interior of the ear) are critical to accurate diagnosis and antibiotics are modestly more effective than no treatment, with most antibiotics demonstrating similar rates of clinical success among children at normal risk, according to an article in the November 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
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