Amygdala News and Research RSS Feed - Amygdala News and Research

BIDMC scientists shed light on how hunger affects the brain’s response to visual food cues

BIDMC scientists shed light on how hunger affects the brain’s response to visual food cues

Our brain pays more attention to food when we are hungry than when we are sated. Now a team of scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has shed light on how the needs of the body affect the way the brain processes visual food cues. [More]
Learning to downregulate amygdala activity could help gain control of emotional responses

Learning to downregulate amygdala activity could help gain control of emotional responses

Training the brain to treat itself is a promising therapy for traumatic stress. The training uses an auditory or visual signal that corresponds to the activity of a particular brain region, called neurofeedback, which can guide people to regulate their own brain activity. [More]
New mouse model helps identify potential drug target for hard-to-treat social aspects of ASD

New mouse model helps identify potential drug target for hard-to-treat social aspects of ASD

A study of a new mouse model identifies a drug target that has the potential to increase social interaction in individuals with some forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The team published their work in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
TSRI researchers find way to switch off urge for compulsive drinking in rat models

TSRI researchers find way to switch off urge for compulsive drinking in rat models

There may be a way to switch off the urge for compulsive drinking, according to a new study in animal models led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. [More]
Research provides insight into link between chronic pain and anxiety

Research provides insight into link between chronic pain and anxiety

New research provides insight into a long-observed, but little-understood connection between chronic pain and anxiety and offers a potential target for treatment. [More]
Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction

New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, suggests that increased levels of a molecule in the brain, called hypocretin, may contribute to cocaine addiction. [More]
New technology allows researchers to temporarily shut down brain area to better understand function

New technology allows researchers to temporarily shut down brain area to better understand function

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center, or CNPRC, at the University of California, Davis, have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining brain. [More]
Researchers identify stress mechanism in the brain that appears to act as social switch

Researchers identify stress mechanism in the brain that appears to act as social switch

Meeting new people can be both stressful and rewarding. Research at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, reported today in Nature Neuroscience, suggests that a molecule involved in regulating stress in the brain may also help determine how willing we are to leave the safety of our social group and strike up new relationships. [More]
Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online July 14 in the journal Neuron. [More]
Regular drug use may hamper moral decision making

Regular drug use may hamper moral decision making

Regular cocaine and methamphetamine users can have difficulty choosing between right and wrong, perhaps because the specific parts of their brains used for moral processing and evaluating emotions are damaged by their prolonged drug habits. [More]
Study shows stress relief after eating highly palatable foods may vary between sexes

Study shows stress relief after eating highly palatable foods may vary between sexes

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that the brain networks that mediate stress relief after eating highly palatable foods may vary between males and females, and may also depend on the stage of the estrous cycle. [More]
Changes in neural circuit involved in emotional resilience may help youngsters adapt to childhood adversity

Changes in neural circuit involved in emotional resilience may help youngsters adapt to childhood adversity

A new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports a neural signature of emotional adaptation that could help researchers understand how the brain adapts to childhood adversity and predict which kids may be vulnerable to developing later psychopathology. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

Epigenetics is the study of changes in organisms caused by modifying gene expression - by alcohol, for example - rather than alteration of the genetic code itself. Recent evidence suggests that alcohol can inhibit activity of an enzyme called histone deacetylase (HDAC) in the amygdala, a brain region that is crucial for storing memories and regulating fear, anxiety, and other emotions. [More]
Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

An international team lead by researchers from CTB-UPM shows that the amygdala in the human brain is able to detect possible threats in the visual environment at ultra-fast time scales. [More]
Scientists use optogenetics technique to increase memory in mice brain

Scientists use optogenetics technique to increase memory in mice brain

Raül Andero Galí, one of the heads of the "Neurobiology of Stress and Addiction" research group at the Institut de Neurociències of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and researcher at Harvard University, published an article in which, for the first time in Spain, optogenetics was used to increase memory. [More]
Understanding how opiates affect brain pathways to drive addiction cycle

Understanding how opiates affect brain pathways to drive addiction cycle

New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle. [More]
Altered circadian somatostatin expression linked to bipolar disorder

Altered circadian somatostatin expression linked to bipolar disorder

Results of the first study of its kind to link abnormalities in circadian rhythms to changes in specific neurotransmitters in people with bipolar disorder will be published this week in the journal Biological Psychiatry. [More]
New experimental drug may prevent stress damage in the brain

New experimental drug may prevent stress damage in the brain

Chronic stress can make us worn-out, anxious, depressed--in fact, it can change the architecture of the brain. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement