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Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

How different are men and women's brains? The latest evidence to address this controversy comes from a study at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, where a meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes found no significant difference between the sexes. [More]
Talking therapy strengthens connections in the brains of people with psychosis, study shows

Talking therapy strengthens connections in the brains of people with psychosis, study shows

A new study from King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust has shown for the first time that cognitive behaviour therapy strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
Acute stress can lead to delayed, long-term psychological trauma

Acute stress can lead to delayed, long-term psychological trauma

Mrs. M would never forget that day. She was walking along a busy road next to the vegetable market when two goons zipped past on a bike. One man's hand shot out and grabbed the chain around her neck. [More]
Optical fibers can identify and control neuroreceptors to rapidly inhibit chronic pain

Optical fibers can identify and control neuroreceptors to rapidly inhibit chronic pain

Pain serves as a valuable warning signal, but when it becomes chronic, pain should be considered as a real disease. [More]
Strong emotional reactions can trigger adrenaline release that causes goose bumps

Strong emotional reactions can trigger adrenaline release that causes goose bumps

When you find yourself in an eerie place or the beat drops just right during a favorite song, the chills start multiplying. You know the feeling. It is a shiver that seems to come from within and makes your hairs stand on end. [More]
New approach to analyzing brain patterns appears to help reduce people’s fear, build confidence

New approach to analyzing brain patterns appears to help reduce people’s fear, build confidence

A new technique of analyzing brain patterns appears to help people overcome fear and build self-confidence. [More]
QUT neuroscientist shows how brainpower could be key to mange stress and lose weight

QUT neuroscientist shows how brainpower could be key to mange stress and lose weight

A QUT neuroscientist internationally acclaimed for her research on alcohol and sugar addiction claims brainpower rather than willpower is the key to living healthily. [More]
Rhythm of breathing influences emotional judgments and memory recall

Rhythm of breathing influences emotional judgments and memory recall

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered for the first time that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall. [More]
Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Cubresa’s SPECT scanner was used to determine if a novel molecular label, TRV6001, in development for in vivo imaging of the BChE enzyme present in the brains of Alzheimer’s Disease patients follows the known distribution of the enzyme in animal models of the disease. [More]
Messenger substance may help in future treatment of anxiety disorders

Messenger substance may help in future treatment of anxiety disorders

The targeted control of biochemical processes and neuronal signalling pathways using the messenger substance neuropeptide Y could help in the future treatment of anxiety disorders. [More]
TSRI scientists uncover clues to abnormal brain connections in autism

TSRI scientists uncover clues to abnormal brain connections in autism

Autism is an agonizing puzzle, a complex mixture of genetic and environmental factors. One piece of this puzzle that has emerged in recent years is a biochemical cascade called the mTOR pathway that regulates growth in the developing brain. [More]
Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Brain imaging scans may one day provide useful information on the response to psychotherapy in patients with depression or anxiety, according to a review of current research in the November/December issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Bone gene in mammals may take additional role to promote cognition in humans

Bone gene in mammals may take additional role to promote cognition in humans

A gene that regulates bone growth and muscle metabolism in mammals may take on an additional role as a promoter of brain maturation, cognition and learning in human and nonhuman prim ates, according to a new study led by neurobiologists at Harvard Medical School. [More]
Novel approach to analyzing brain structures may help predict progression of Alzheimer's disease

Novel approach to analyzing brain structures may help predict progression of Alzheimer's disease

Use of a novel approach to analyzing brain structure that focuses on the shape rather than the size of particular features may allow identification of individuals in early presymptomatic stages of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Brain atrophy patterns linked to loss of specific cognitive abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Brain atrophy patterns linked to loss of specific cognitive abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Mathematical modeling of the brain scans of patients with Alzheimer's disease and others at risk for the devastating neurodegenerative disorder has identified specific patterns of brain atrophy that appear to be related to the loss of particular cognitive abilities. [More]
People with PTSD appear to suffer from disrupted context processing, say researchers

People with PTSD appear to suffer from disrupted context processing, say researchers

For decades, neuroscientists and physicians have tried to get to the bottom of the age-old mystery of post-traumatic stress disorder, to explain why only some people are vulnerable and why they experience so many symptoms and so much disability. [More]
BIDMC scientists shed light on how hunger affects the brain’s response to visual food cues

BIDMC scientists shed light on how hunger affects the brain’s response to visual food cues

Our brain pays more attention to food when we are hungry than when we are sated. Now a team of scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has shed light on how the needs of the body affect the way the brain processes visual food cues. [More]
Learning to downregulate amygdala activity could help gain control of emotional responses

Learning to downregulate amygdala activity could help gain control of emotional responses

Training the brain to treat itself is a promising therapy for traumatic stress. The training uses an auditory or visual signal that corresponds to the activity of a particular brain region, called neurofeedback, which can guide people to regulate their own brain activity. [More]
New mouse model helps identify potential drug target for hard-to-treat social aspects of ASD

New mouse model helps identify potential drug target for hard-to-treat social aspects of ASD

A study of a new mouse model identifies a drug target that has the potential to increase social interaction in individuals with some forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The team published their work in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
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