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Neuroinflammation levels higher in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Neuroinflammation levels higher in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, in collaboration with Osaka City University and Kansai University of Welfare Sciences, have used functional PET imaging to show that levels of neuroinflammation, or inflammation of the nervous system, are higher in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome than in healthy people. [More]
Brain disconnect leaves teen brain less able to judge trustworthiness

Brain disconnect leaves teen brain less able to judge trustworthiness

Making a snap decision usually means following your initial reaction -- going with your gut. That intuitive feeling sprouts from the limbic system, the evolutionarily older and simpler part of the brain that affects emotion, behavior and motivation. [More]

Biological basis for visual hallucinations identified

Visual hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia may be caused by hyperconnectivity in a specific area of the brain, say researchers. [More]

Study: Musical aptitude is affected by a combination of genes involved in auditory pathway

Multiple regions in the human genome are reported to be linked to musical aptitude, according to a study published this week in Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
Parkinson's patients under risk of developing dementia can be identified quickly, say researchers

Parkinson's patients under risk of developing dementia can be identified quickly, say researchers

It may now be possible to identify the first-stage Parkinson's patients who will go on to develop dementia, according to a study conducted at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal by Dr. Oury Monchi, PhD, and his postdoctoral student, Dr. Alexandru Hanganu, MD, PhD, both of whom are affiliated with Université de Montréal. [More]

Music does not speak to everyone

Although it is not associated with any apparent biological advantagess or useful value (such as money), music is ranked among the highest sources of pleasure. Music's important role in our society and culture has led to the assumption that its ability to induce pleasure is universal. However, this assumption has never been empirically tested. [More]
Far-reaching neurons connect amygdala with fear response center to control behavior

Far-reaching neurons connect amygdala with fear response center to control behavior

Fear is primal. In the wild, it serves as a protective mechanism, allowing animals to avoid predators or other perceived threats. For humans, fear is much more complex. A normal amount keeps us safe from danger. But in extreme cases, like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), too much fear can prevent people from living healthy, productive lives. [More]
Chronic stress generates long-term changes in brain that lead to mental problems

Chronic stress generates long-term changes in brain that lead to mental problems

University of California, Berkeley, researchers have shown that chronic stress generates long-term changes in the brain that may explain why people suffering chronic stress are prone to mental problems such as anxiety and mood disorders later in life. [More]

Researchers investigate sex differences in brain structure

Reviewing over 20 years of neuroscience research into sex differences in brain structure, a Cambridge University team has conducted the first meta-analysis of the evidence, published this week in the prestigious journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. [More]
Transcendental meditation technique shows significant reduction in PTSD in just 10 days

Transcendental meditation technique shows significant reduction in PTSD in just 10 days

African civilians in war-torn countries have experienced the threat of violence or death, and many have witnessed the abuse, torture, rape and even murder of loved ones. Many Congolese living in Ugandan refugee camps are suffering from severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [More]
Researchers pinpoint neural circuitry that promotes stress-induced anxiety

Researchers pinpoint neural circuitry that promotes stress-induced anxiety

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over 18 percent of American adults suffer from anxiety disorders, characterized as excessive worry or tension that often leads to other physical symptoms. Previous studies of anxiety in the brain have focused on the amygdala, an area known to play a role in fear. [More]

Findings suggest possible clinical uses of ecstasy in treating anxiety and PTSD

Brain imaging experiments have revealed for the first time how ecstasy produces feelings of euphoria in users. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researcher to receive 2014 Troland Research Award

Cedars-Sinai researcher to receive 2014 Troland Research Award

Ueli Rutishauser, PhD, assistant professor of neurosurgery and director of human neurophysiology research in the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Neurology at Cedars-Sinai, will receive a 2014 Troland Research Award at the National Academy of Sciences annual meeting April 27. [More]
Nociceptin in brain naturally moderates effects of stress

Nociceptin in brain naturally moderates effects of stress

Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the University of Camerino in Italy have published new findings on a system in the brain that naturally moderates the effects of stress. [More]

Researchers hope for a pharmacological solution to treat cocaine addiction

Imagine kicking a cocaine addiction by simply popping a pill that alters the way your brain processes chemical addiction. New research from the University of Pittsburgh suggests that a method of biologically manipulating certain neurocircuits could lead to a pharmacological approach that would weaken post-withdrawal cocaine cravings. The findings have been published in Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Researchers discover how PC7 protein affects certain types of cognitive performance

Researchers discover how PC7 protein affects certain types of cognitive performance

A team of Montr-al researchers at the IRCM led by Dr. Nabil G. Seidah, in collaboration with Dr. William C. Wetsel's team at Duke University in the United States, discovered that the protein PC7 plays a critical role in the brain by affecting certain types of cognitive performance such as anxiety, learning and emotional memory. Their results, recently published in the scientific journals Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and Nature, could have a significant impact on regulating behaviour related to anxiety disorders and trauma. [More]
Depression during pregnancy may affect child's mental health

Depression during pregnancy may affect child's mental health

Depression is a serious mental illness that has many negative consequences for sufferers. But depression among pregnant women may also have an impact on their developing babies. [More]
Missing inhibitory connection in brain can trigger social phobias

Missing inhibitory connection in brain can trigger social phobias

Fear, at the right level, can increase alertness and protect against dangers. Disproportionate fear, on the other hand, can disrupt the sensory perception, be disabling, reduce happiness and therefore become a danger in itself. [More]
Maternal depression may impact babies’ brain development

Maternal depression may impact babies’ brain development

Depression is a serious mental illness that has many negative consequences for sufferers. But depression among pregnant women may also have an impact on their developing babies. [More]

Children who experience profound neglect are more prone to indiscriminate friendliness

Children who experience profound neglect have been found to be more prone to a behavior known as "indiscriminate friendliness," characterized by an inappropriate willingness to approach adults, including strangers. [More]