Anatomy News and Research RSS Feed - Anatomy News and Research

Biomarker could help identify heart failure patients suitable for cardiac recovery therapies

Biomarker could help identify heart failure patients suitable for cardiac recovery therapies

Investigators at the University of Utah have identified distinct differences in the hearts of advanced heart failure patients who have defied the odds and showed signs of recovery from the disease. Published online in the journal Circulation, the new findings could help clinicians identify the best candidates for cardiac recovery therapies. [More]
New augmented-reality technology designed by Philips for spine surgery

New augmented-reality technology designed by Philips for spine surgery

Royal Philips, a leader in integrated image-guided therapy solutions, today announced the development of an industry-first augmented-reality surgical navigation technology that is designed to help surgeons perform image-guided open and minimally-invasive spine surgery. Philips is a pioneer in hybrid operating room (hybrid OR) solutions to facilitate both surgical and minimally-invasive endovascular procedures, with over 750 hybrid ORs installed globally. The addition of this new augmented reality technology will further widen the scope of Philips hybrid OR solutions to other fast-growing areas of image-guided surgery including spine, cranial and trauma procedures. [More]
Computational walking model could help stroke patients achieve optimal recovery

Computational walking model could help stroke patients achieve optimal recovery

After a stroke, patients typically have trouble walking and few are able to regain the gait they had before suffering a stroke. Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have developed a computational walking model that could help guide patients to their best possible recovery after a stroke. [More]
Antibiotics targeting brain’s inflammatory response may exacerbate cognitive deficits in children

Antibiotics targeting brain’s inflammatory response may exacerbate cognitive deficits in children

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of disability and death in infants and children in the United States, with more than half a million affected annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
NCCN publishes new easy-to-understand patient education resources focused on brain cancer

NCCN publishes new easy-to-understand patient education resources focused on brain cancer

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the NCCN Guidelines for Patients and NCCN Quick Guide sheets for Brain Cancer - Gliomas—the first in a series of patient education resources focused on Brain Cancer. [More]
Premature infants show changes in neural systems prior to birth, new study suggests

Premature infants show changes in neural systems prior to birth, new study suggests

Even before they are born, premature babies may display alterations in the circuitry of their developing brains, according to a first-of-its kind research study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues at the National Institutes of Health and Wayne State University. [More]
Researchers develop innovative technique to examine and quantify blood vessels in the brain

Researchers develop innovative technique to examine and quantify blood vessels in the brain

A study published today in the Journal of Anatomy has made an important breakthrough in the examination of blood vessels in the brain giving scientists a clearer understanding of how dementia, brain cancer and stroke can affect veins and capillaries in this organ. [More]
How does the brain control appetite?

How does the brain control appetite?

Energy balance between energy intake and expenditure in our bodies is important for maintaining energy homeostasis to keep our bodies functioning properly. The appetite determines how much we eat, the energy intake, by communication between the brain and body. [More]
Powerful version of anti-inflammatory molecule may help protect vision in diabetic retinopathy

Powerful version of anti-inflammatory molecule may help protect vision in diabetic retinopathy

A more powerful version of an anti-inflammatory molecule already circulating in our blood may help protect our vision in the face of diabetes. [More]
First interactive 3D video hologram displays live footage of internal organs

First interactive 3D video hologram displays live footage of internal organs

UK scientists are developing an interactive holographic video created from an MRI or CT scan that can display live footage of internal organs in front of a user where features can be rotated, enlarged, and isolated, delivering a breakthrough in medical imaging and education. [More]
Continental Who's Who recognizes Stanley J. Dudrick as Pinnacle Lifetime Member in the medical field

Continental Who's Who recognizes Stanley J. Dudrick as Pinnacle Lifetime Member in the medical field

Continental Who's Who recognizes Stanley J. Dudrick, M.D., FACS, as a Pinnacle Lifetime Member in recognition of his contributions to the field of medicine. [More]

Light treatment can help increase anthocyanin production in turfgrasses

Anthocyanins, plant pigments known for their health-promoting properties, are in demand for medicinal and industrial uses. Anthocyanins have become sought-after natural products, but the small number of plants that naturally produce anthocyanins has limited their widespread use. [More]
UCLA-led consortium receives $8.6 million NIH grant to map the heart's nervous system

UCLA-led consortium receives $8.6 million NIH grant to map the heart's nervous system

A consortium directed by UCLA's Dr. Kalyanam Shivkumar has received a three-year, $8.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to map the heart's nervous system. [More]
New ASRM embryo transfer simulator garners positive response from reproductive health professionals

New ASRM embryo transfer simulator garners positive response from reproductive health professionals

Introduced in October 2015 at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Annual Scientific Congress, the ASRM Embryo Transfer Simulator (“Simulator”) has been successfully deployed over the last 12 months at embryo transfer simulation workshops and training sessions from Alabama to Helsinki, garnering positive response from the hundreds of physicians and healthcare professionals who have experienced working with the Simulator, most recently in Salt Lake City, UT at the ASRM 2016 Scientific Congress & Expo. [More]
University of Limerick professor outlines evidence for categorising mesentery as organ

University of Limerick professor outlines evidence for categorising mesentery as organ

A University of Limerick professor has identified an emerging area of science having reclassified part of the digestive system as an organ. [More]
Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis

Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis

A study headed by Salvador Aznar Benitah, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine, and published today in Nature identifies metastasis-initiating cells through a specific marker, namely the protein CD36. [More]
Scientists discover how motors maneuver cells' intricate roadway system

Scientists discover how motors maneuver cells' intricate roadway system

Much like motors power our cars, they also ensure that proteins get to the right place in our cells, and a wide variety of diseases - from cancer to heart problems - can result when they don't. [More]
Memories appear to be shared than idiosyncratic, study shows

Memories appear to be shared than idiosyncratic, study shows

We tend to think of our memories as unique, but a Princeton University-led study shows that memories are often shared rather than idiosyncratic. [More]
NTU scientists develop new ultrasound device with 3D printed lenses for sharper images

NTU scientists develop new ultrasound device with 3D printed lenses for sharper images

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have developed a new ultrasound device that produces sharper images through 3D printed lenses. [More]
Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at NEOMED have just identified a major connection between areas of the brainstem - the ancient area that controls mood, sleep and metabolism - and detrimental changes to bone in a preclinical model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement