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Pie Medical Imaging receives 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership

Pie Medical Imaging receives 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership

Based on its recent analysis of the cardiovascular image management market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Pie Medical Imaging (PMI) with the 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership. [More]
New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

A cross-disciplinary center focused on identifying connections between environmental toxins and disease has been established at UC Davis Health System with the ultimate goal of developing preventions and policies that protect communities from unhealthy exposures. [More]
Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

If you think that performing CPR on a person whose heart has stopped is a surefire way to save their life, you may be watching too much TV. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

As advances in medicine are giving rise to growing numbers of children who are surviving severe heart defects, a phenomenon is emerging that is catching parents and healthcare providers off-guard. Over half of these children also have a seemingly unrelated disability: neurodevelopmental disorders. Some have severe cognitive and motor deficits that arise early. [More]
Penn State College of Medicine students to work with medical educators to design new curriculum

Penn State College of Medicine students to work with medical educators to design new curriculum

The medical school model that has existed for decades involves two years of study in the basic sciences followed by two years of clinical study. An initiative under way at Penn State College of Medicine will involve students in developing a new curriculum that integrates the two areas of study, with a goal of preparing physicians for the new realities of health care. [More]
Boston Scientific receives FDA approval for Innova Vascular Self-Expanding Stent System

Boston Scientific receives FDA approval for Innova Vascular Self-Expanding Stent System

Boston Scientific Corporation has received Food and Drug Administration approval for the Innova Vascular Self-Expanding Stent System, an advanced treatment option for patients with narrowing or blockages in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) or proximal popliteal artery (PPA). [More]

Elsevier announces Gray's Anatomy Art Contest winners

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and publisher of Gray's Anatomy, the world's most famous anatomical reference, has selected Amanda Lilleston of Ann Arbor, Mich., as the winner of the Gray's Anatomy Art Contest. Christopher Smith of Silver Springs, Md., was named runner-up. [More]
U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

With every breath you take, microbes have a chance of making it into your lungs. But what happens when they get there? And why do dangerous lung infections like pneumonia happen in some people, but not others? Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have started to answer these questions by studying the microbiome of the lungs - the community of microscopic organisms that are in constant contact with our respiratory system. [More]
New study reveals role of hydrogen sulfide gas in autoimmune disease

New study reveals role of hydrogen sulfide gas in autoimmune disease

The immune system not only responds to infections and other potentially problematic abnormalities in the body, it also contains a built-in brake in the form of regulatory T cells, or Tregs. Tregs ensure that inflammatory responses don't get out of hand and do damage. In autoimmune diseases, sometimes these Treg cells don't act as they should. [More]

EPFL scientists reveal that the brain is not as compact as we thought

Using an innovative method, EPFL scientists show that the brain is not as compact as we have thought all along. To study the fine structure of the brain, including its connections between neurons, the synapses, scientists must use electron microscopes. However, the tissue must first be fixed to prepare it for this high magnification imaging method. [More]
Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

A receptor that is already a target for treating neurodegenerative disease also appears to play a key role in supporting the retina, scientists report. [More]
U-M’s Taubman Health Sciences Library reopens as transformed space for learning, teaching

U-M’s Taubman Health Sciences Library reopens as transformed space for learning, teaching

The books moved out two years ago, and the construction crews moved in. And today, the University of Michigan's Taubman Health Sciences Library reopens as a transformed space for learning, teaching and gathering. [More]
3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

Boston Children's Hospital physicians report the first cases of children benefiting from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk brain procedures. [More]
New study reports creation of genetic porcine model of cancer

New study reports creation of genetic porcine model of cancer

With many types of cancers, early detection offers the best hope for survival. However, research into new early-detection screenings, as well as possible interventional radiology and surgical treatments, has been hindered by the lack of a large animal model that would accurately reflect the types of cancers seen in human cells. [More]
New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

Following several years of research and collaboration, physicians and engineers at Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center say they have developed a computer platform that provides rapid, real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery, which may someday improve face-jaw-teeth alignment between donor and recipient. [More]
Codman Neuro introduces new platform of embolic coils for treatment of brain aneurysms

Codman Neuro introduces new platform of embolic coils for treatment of brain aneurysms

Codman Neuro, part of DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, has introduced a new platform of embolic coils for the treatment of brain aneurysms, supported by an enhanced detachment system designed to improve microcatheter stability and provide an optimized detachment zone for coils. [More]
New findings unlock clues to disease protection

New findings unlock clues to disease protection

When disease-resistant rice is invaded by disease-causing bacteria, a small protein produced by the bacteria betrays the invader. Upon recognizing that protein, the rice plants sense that a microbial attack is underway and are able to mount an immune response to fend off bacterial infection, reports a research team led by the University of California, Davis. [More]
Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

An alarming 22 percent of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. [More]
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