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Gene mutation linked to autism plays key role in formation, maturation of synapses

Gene mutation linked to autism plays key role in formation, maturation of synapses

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals that a gene mutation associated with autism plays a critical role in the formation and maturation of synapses -- the connections that allow neurons to communicate with each other. [More]
Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Glyphosate, often sold under the brand name of Roundup, is the world's most widely used weed-killer. While Glyphosate has approval from regulatory bodies worldwide, there are growing concerns about its possible adverse health effects. [More]
Clinicians perform UK’s first MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment for prostate cancer

Clinicians perform UK’s first MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment for prostate cancer

INSIGHTEC congratulates the medical team at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust for performing the first MR-guided focused ultrasound treatment in the United Kingdom for prostate cancer. [More]
Suture anchor technique supports more knee movement during recovery process

Suture anchor technique supports more knee movement during recovery process

Quadriceps tendon ruptures are disabling knee injuries that typically occur in adults ages 40 and older. Obesity, illness or traumatic injuries can cause these types of injuries. [More]
Research findings on K2M’s RAVINE® lateral access system to be presented at SpineWeek 2016

Research findings on K2M’s RAVINE® lateral access system to be presented at SpineWeek 2016

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine and minimally invasive spine technologies and techniques, today announced that research on K2M’s RAVINE® Lateral Access System will be presented at the SpineWeek 2016 Annual Meeting, occurring May 16–20 in Singapore. [More]
Arterial switch to 12 o'clock position linked to myocardial ischaemia risk in adolescence

Arterial switch to 12 o'clock position linked to myocardial ischaemia risk in adolescence

Arterial switch to the 12 o'clock position is associated with abnormal coronary perfusion in adolescence, reveals research presented today at EuroCMR 2016.1 Babies born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) undergo the arterial switch operation in the first days of life. [More]
New CMR imaging technique increases accuracy by eliminating patients' need to breathe naturally

New CMR imaging technique increases accuracy by eliminating patients' need to breathe naturally

A new technique for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging improves accuracy by removing patients' need to breathe, reveals research presented today at EuroCMR 2016 by Professor Juerg Schwitter, director of the Cardiac MR Centre at the University Hospital Lausanne, Switzerland. [More]
Vessel-sparing radiation, better understanding of prostate anatomy can improve quality of life

Vessel-sparing radiation, better understanding of prostate anatomy can improve quality of life

Remember the game Operation? You need to carefully remove the body part without nicking the sides or the buzzer will sound. [More]
Could oral supplements affect teenage behavior? An interview with Prof. Stein and Dr Tammam

Could oral supplements affect teenage behavior? An interview with Prof. Stein and Dr Tammam

We wanted to see whether supplementing the diet of disadvantaged adolescents with the omega 3 polyunsaturated acids, EPA & DHA, vitamins and minerals over a school term might improve their antisocial behaviour, which usually gets worse during a term. [More]
New portable device with hand-held probe could help reduce unnecessary thyroid cancer surgery

New portable device with hand-held probe could help reduce unnecessary thyroid cancer surgery

A team of experts from around Europe has come together to develop a portable device with a hand-held probe that will dramatically reduce invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the treatment of thyroid nodules, saving approximately €450 million Euros every year. [More]
Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. [More]
Scientists develop new technology that helps visualize translation of mRNA into proteins

Scientists develop new technology that helps visualize translation of mRNA into proteins

For the first time, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have developed a technology allowing them to "see" single molecules of messenger RNA as they are translated into proteins in living mammalian cells. Initial findings using this technology that may shed light on neurological diseases as well as cancer were published online today in Science. [More]
Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers from the University of Adelaide say the global increase in cases of type 1 diabetes is directly linked to advances in medical care, with the underlying genetics of the disease more likely to be passed from one generation to the next. [More]

New De Gruyter journal emphasizes more research on pleura and peritoneum

Pleura and Peritoneum, a new De Gruyter journal, aims to reinvigorate research into the relatively obscure membranes that protect the lungs and abdomen. While the pleura and peritoneum have been largely overlooked by researchers in recent years, this wasn't always the case: Ancient medical literature discusses both organs, and prior to 1930 the pleura was the subject of numerous scientific disputes in the fields of anatomy and surgery. [More]
Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Researchers have found that treating patients who have early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a type of radiotherapy called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is associated with a small but increased risk of death from causes other than cancer. [More]
NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

It is estimated that more than 72,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHL) in 2016. The sixth leading cancer diagnosis in U.S. men and women, NHL has more than 30 sub-types, each featuring unique treatment choices and challenges. [More]
Clinicians describe placement of first implantable hemodynamic monitor in single ventricle Fontan anatomy

Clinicians describe placement of first implantable hemodynamic monitor in single ventricle Fontan anatomy

While the Fontan procedure has improved the short- and mid-term outcomes for patients born with single ventricle anatomy, long-term complications of Fontan circulation include heart failure. These complications are thought to be secondary to elevated central venous pressure, chronic venous congestion and low cardiac output. [More]
Long way to go in better understanding brain abnormalities linked with autism

Long way to go in better understanding brain abnormalities linked with autism

A recent review that examined all published studies on anatomical abnormalities in the brains of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder found substantial discrepancy throughout the literature regarding the reported presence and significance of neuroanatomical findings. [More]
Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. [More]
Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

While we look to invent new medicines to treat cancer, a parallel approach to repurpose existing medicines may be highly effective. Stress, mediated by adrenaline, has been suspected to promote cancer growth and this research study shows that by blocking adrenaline receptors in breast cancers, they are less successful in spreading to and growing in the brain. [More]
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