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Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

The nation's first and only proton therapy center to treat patients exclusively with pencil-beam scanning is reporting exceptional results in delivering cancer treatment since opening for patient care just more than a year ago. [More]
Nerve cells guide each other during embryonic development

Nerve cells guide each other during embryonic development

When nerve cells form in an embryo they do not start off in the right place but have to be guided to their final position by navigating a kind of molecular and cellular "map" in order to function properly. In a recent research study published in Nature Communications neurobiologist Sara Wilson, Umeå University, found that during embryonic development different parts of the nerve cell are important for guiding other nerve cells into their physical positions. [More]
New work challenges long-held beliefs about link between hippocampus and improved memory function

New work challenges long-held beliefs about link between hippocampus and improved memory function

New work by the Douglas Mental Health University Institute (CIUSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'île-de-MontréalI) computational neuroscientist Mallar Chakravarty, PhD, and in collaboration with researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health challenges in a thrilling way the long-held belief that a larger hippocampus is directly linked to improved memory function. [More]

Innovative human hunting weapons not behind the demise of Neanderthals, study finds

The demise of Neanderthals may have nothing to do with innovative hunting weapons carried by humans from west Asia, according to a new study published in the Journal of Human Evolution. The researchers, from Nagoya University and The University of Tokyo, Japan, say their findings mean that we may need to rethink the reasons humans survived Neanderthals - and that we may not have behaved as differently as we thought. [More]
Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Stroke is a frequent and dreaded complication of atrial fibrillation. But predicting which of the estimated six million Americans with a-fib are at highest risk has long challenged physicians weighing stroke risk against the serious side effects posed by lifelong therapy with warfarin and other blood thinners. [More]
Researchers move one step closer to developing effective radiotherapy for lung cancer

Researchers move one step closer to developing effective radiotherapy for lung cancer

Radiotherapy using protons can deliver more accurate treatment to a tumour while reducing the dose to surrounding tissue. However, in mobile organs such as the lung, precise targeting of the dose is difficult. Now researchers have succeeded in making a model of breathing movement that allows for the precise measurement of narrow beams to a dummy tumour by simulating the motion and physical properties of the chest anatomy in a model, the 3rd ESTRO Forum in Barcelona, Spain, will hear today (Monday). [More]
Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Fragile X syndrome, an inherited cause of autism and intellectual disability, can have consequences even for carriers of the disorder who don't have full-blown symptoms. [More]
ViewRay to exhibit MRI-guided radiation therapy system at ESTRO Forum

ViewRay to exhibit MRI-guided radiation therapy system at ESTRO Forum

ViewRay, makers of the world's first and only MRI-guided radiation therapy system, announced today that the company will showcase its MRIdian System at the 3rd ESTRO Forum, the annual meeting of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, being held April 24-28, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

New research published this week in Nature has found several drugs could lead to new treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS), including two drugs that effectively treat MS at the source, in vivo. When administered at the peak of disease, these two drugs showed a striking reversal of disease severity. [More]
Stem cell treatment repairs birth defect, provides facial regeneration for people suffering traumatic injury

Stem cell treatment repairs birth defect, provides facial regeneration for people suffering traumatic injury

Researchers have pinpointed a primary cause of a rare skull disorder in infants, and the discovery could help wounded soldiers, car-wreck victims and other patients recover from disfiguring facial injuries. [More]
RetroSense Therapeutics receives Luis Villalobos Award

RetroSense Therapeutics receives Luis Villalobos Award

RetroSense Therapeutics, LLC, a Wayne State University start-up biotechnology company, has received the Luis Villalobos Award from the Angel Capital Association, the world's leading professional association for angel investors. [More]
Mindfulness meditation can reduce pain, anxiety in healthy individuals

Mindfulness meditation can reduce pain, anxiety in healthy individuals

When Rebecca Erwin was a varsity rower at the University of North Carolina, the coach had the team's members take a yoga and meditation class. [More]
UC Davis' John S. Werner wins 2015 Verriest Medal from International Colour Vision Society

UC Davis' John S. Werner wins 2015 Verriest Medal from International Colour Vision Society

John S. Werner, a UC Davis neuroscientist and international authority on visual perception, has been selected to receive the 2015 Verriest Medal from the International Colour Vision Society for his contributions to understanding the structural and functional basis of color vision, how and why vision changes across the life span, and factors that contribute to loss of vision associated with disease. He will receive the award at the society's biennial symposium in Sendai, Japan, in July. [More]
Research breakthrough could help develop tools to repair damaged nerve cells

Research breakthrough could help develop tools to repair damaged nerve cells

A team of researchers at the IRCM led by Frédéric Charron, PhD, in collaboration with bioengineers at McGill University, uncovered a new kind of synergy in the development of the nervous system, which explains an important mechanism required for neural circuits to form properly. [More]
Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two approaches to fat grafting--injection of fat cells versus fat-derived stem cells--have similar effects in reversing the cellular-level signs of aging skin, reports a study in the April issue of , the official medical journal of the [More]
DePuy Synthes adds four new products to adult deformity portfolio

DePuy Synthes adds four new products to adult deformity portfolio

DePuy Synthes Companies announced the addition of four new products to its adult deformity portfolio as well as a new education offering, continuing its expansion of one of the broadest spine portfolios in the industry. The products were displayed by DePuy Synthes Spine at the 81st annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. [More]
UCLA-led team validates first standardized protocol for tracking early signs of Alzheimer's disease

UCLA-led team validates first standardized protocol for tracking early signs of Alzheimer's disease

After six years of painstaking research, a UCLA-led team has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease -- the atrophy of the part of the brain known as the hippocampus. [More]
K2M announces enhanced complex spine portfolio with addition of its innovative NILE™ alternative fixation spinal system

K2M announces enhanced complex spine portfolio with addition of its innovative NILE™ alternative fixation spinal system

NILE features low-profile, robust implants and intuitive and light ergonomic instruments, intended to provide stabilization between the spine and the rod, and to allow for reduction, translation, compression and distraction while sparing the anatomy... [More]
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