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Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

An international team, made up of researchers from the University of Granada, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of South Florida, has linked the symptoms of schizophrenia with the anatomical characteristics of the brain, by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [More]
Findings may explain why type 2 diabetic patients experience smelling problems

Findings may explain why type 2 diabetic patients experience smelling problems

In a study in type 2 diabetic rats, researchers at the Karolinska Institutet have identified alterations in specific nerve cells that are important for odor identification. The findings might explain why type 2 diabetic patients often experience smelling problems and potentially open up a new research field to develop preventive therapies against neurodegenerative diseases in type 2 diabetic patients. [More]
Growing up in poverty could alter children's brain connectivity, increase risk of depression

Growing up in poverty could alter children's brain connectivity, increase risk of depression

Many negative consequences are linked to growing up poor, and researchers at Washington University St. Louis have identified one more: altered brain connectivity. [More]
Determining ectopeptidase activity: an interview with Professor Stephen Weber, University of Pittsburgh

Determining ectopeptidase activity: an interview with Professor Stephen Weber, University of Pittsburgh

The scope of the activity of neuropeptides is remarkably broad. For example, neuropeptides are involved in pain control, mood/depression/eating disorders, social and emotional behaviour, body weight, drug abuse, stress, reproduction, motor control, memory, and in maintaining neuronal health when they are stressed. [More]
American College of Cardiology to honor LA BioMed researcher with Distinguished Teacher Award

American College of Cardiology to honor LA BioMed researcher with Distinguished Teacher Award

John Michael Criley, MD, a Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute researcher, will receive the 2016 Distinguished Teacher Award from the American College of Cardiology on April 4 at the organization's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago, IL. [More]
New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

A new classification of coronary congenital diseases is set to help surgeons identify secondary defects in the operating theatre. The scheme is outlined in a novel European Society of Cardiology position paper published today in Cardiovascular Research.1 Clinical cardiologists will also know what to look for on cardiovascular images. [More]
Ideal Billing Solutions educates clients on ICD-10

Ideal Billing Solutions educates clients on ICD-10

Ideal Billing Solutions is a medical billing services company in West Palm Beach Florida. Since October 1, 2015, the company has gotten phone calls from physicians and healthcare providers asking questions about ICD-10. [More]
Heart attack patients with bypass history more likely to have delayed treatment

Heart attack patients with bypass history more likely to have delayed treatment

Heart attack patients who had previously undergone cardiac bypass surgery are about twice as likely to have a delay in receiving angioplasty, or another form of revascularization, compared to heart attack patients who had no history of bypass surgery or previous angioplasty. [More]
Bond villain fails neuroanatomy, says St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon

Bond villain fails neuroanatomy, says St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon

James Bond's nemesis in the most recent film likely failed neuroanatomy, said real-life neurosurgeon and scientist Dr. Michael Cusimano of St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Researchers awarded $16 million NIH/NINDS grant to create methods for detecting CTE during life

Researchers awarded $16 million NIH/NINDS grant to create methods for detecting CTE during life

Researchers from Boston University, the Cleveland Clinic, Banner Alzheimer's Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, have been awarded a $16 million grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. [More]
Excess body fat may affect bone growth in children

Excess body fat may affect bone growth in children

Studies have shown that obese children tend to have more muscle, but recent University of Georgia research on the muscle and bone relationship shows that excess body fat may compromise other functions in their bodies, such as bone growth. [More]
New vaccine shows promise against Middle East respiratory syndrome in dromedary camels

New vaccine shows promise against Middle East respiratory syndrome in dromedary camels

An international research project with the involvement of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the Animal Health Research Centre (IRTA-CReSA), has designed a vaccine shown to be effective in protecting dromedaries against the coronavirus (CoV) that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). [More]
Synthetic biomaterial aids in regeneration of skin cells to improve wound healing

Synthetic biomaterial aids in regeneration of skin cells to improve wound healing

Some skin wounds, such as diabetic ulcers, are chronic and may never heal; others, such as burn wounds, are often large and difficult to treat, resulting in pain, infection and scarring. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, funded by the National Institutes of Health, have developed a synthetic biomaterial that fills wounds and aids in regeneration of skin cells, which ultimately improves wound healing. [More]
Clinical depression during early childhood can change the brain's anatomy

Clinical depression during early childhood can change the brain's anatomy

The brains of children who suffer clinical depression as preschoolers develop abnormally, compared with the brains of preschoolers unaffected by the disorder, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
CRISPR-Cas9 can help knock out genes in exotic animals

CRISPR-Cas9 can help knock out genes in exotic animals

The simplicity of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing will soon make studying the genes of any organism, from the simplest slime mold to the octopus, as easy as it now is to study the genes controlling development in standard lab animals such as nematodes, fruit flies, frogs and mice. [More]
Researchers discover unique muscle fibers of upper airways often present in sleep apnea patients

Researchers discover unique muscle fibers of upper airways often present in sleep apnea patients

Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have discovered unique muscle fibers in the soft palate of the mouth in both infants and adults. The fibers seem to be present in greater number in snorers and sleep apnea patients. [More]
Air evacuations may pose significant added risk to patients with traumatic brain injury

Air evacuations may pose significant added risk to patients with traumatic brain injury

Over the past 15 years, more than 330,000 U.S. soldiers have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is one of the leading causes of death and disability connected to the country's recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Many of these patients were evacuated by air from these countries to Europe and the U.S. for further treatment. In general, these patients were flown quickly to hospitals outside the battle zone, where more extensive treatment was available. [More]
Olympus introduces EZDilate balloon dilator for improved control in endoscopic balloon dilation procedures

Olympus introduces EZDilate balloon dilator for improved control in endoscopic balloon dilation procedures

Olympus, a global technology leader in designing and delivering innovative solutions for medical and surgical procedures, among other core businesses, announced today its new 510(k) cleared EZDilate multi-stage endoscopic balloon dilator for improved precision and control in endoscopic balloon dilation procedures. [More]
MedUni Vienna researchers discover genetic cause of a rare disease

MedUni Vienna researchers discover genetic cause of a rare disease

Researchers at MedUni Vienna have discovered the genetic cause of a rare disease characterized by life-threatening "liver crises" in early childhood and subsequent manifestation of neurological symptoms, such as neuropathy and ataxia (a movement disorder), when they reach school age. [More]
Study shows mindfulness meditation reduces pain more effectively than placebo

Study shows mindfulness meditation reduces pain more effectively than placebo

Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found new evidence that mindfulness meditation reduces pain more effectively than placebo. [More]
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