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U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
New anesthesia procedure demonstrates cause of obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea

New anesthesia procedure demonstrates cause of obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea

A simplified anesthesia procedure may enable more widespread use of preoperative testing to demonstrate the cause of airway obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Children's favorite foods can pose choking hazards

Children's favorite foods can pose choking hazards

Most parents never dream that their children's favorite foods can pose choking hazards. It happened to Landon Jones when he was 15 months old. He was walking around eating a handful of nuts when a cashew became lodged in his bronchi (wind passage to his lung) causing wheezing and coughing. [More]
Smile Train, Biodigital  to showcase Virtual Surgery Simulator at TEDMED 2014

Smile Train, Biodigital to showcase Virtual Surgery Simulator at TEDMED 2014

Smile Train and its technology partner BioDigital have been selected to showcase their Virtual Surgery Simulator among leading global health innovations in The Hive at TEDMED 2014, which will take place in Washington, D.C. at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. [More]
Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Clinicians and researchers from Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University will present new findings from eight abstracts at the International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies World Congress being held July 26 - July 30 in New York. [More]

Eminent doctor explores the science behind flavor perfect food

As a featured speaker at Catersource's Art of Catering Food conference in Atlanta, GA August 4­–6 at the Atlanta Convention Center at AmericasMart, Dr Larrian Gillespie, CEO of Culinary Science Investigations of Beverly Hills, CA brings her extensive medical and pharmaceutical background to the culinary world, where she will explore the science behind what makes food delicious. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
New study explores processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain

New study explores processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These connections, or synapses, allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body. [More]
Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on hippocampal neuronal injury, neurite outgrowth

Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on hippocampal neuronal injury, neurite outgrowth

The main pathological changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include amyloid-beta protein-induced hippocampal neuronal injury and neurite outgrowth impairment. [More]
Study confirms Stretta therapy as safe, effective treatment for GERD

Study confirms Stretta therapy as safe, effective treatment for GERD

A newly published peer-reviewed paper concludes that Stretta therapy is a safe, effective and durable treatment for gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The paper states that Stretta addresses a significant unmet need where patients receive inadequate control from PPI therapy and find surgery an undesirable option. [More]

New '3D Printed Anatomy Series' can revolutionise medical education and training

The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionise medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical. [More]
VENITI’s IDE receives FDA approval for VENITI VICI Venous Stent System

VENITI’s IDE receives FDA approval for VENITI VICI Venous Stent System

VENITI, Inc., a company dedicated to providing innovative technology for the treatment of venous disease, announced that it has received approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) to begin the VIRTUS trial of the VENITI VICI Venous Stent System. [More]
Breg launches FreeRunner knee brace for runners suffering from patellofemoral pain syndrome

Breg launches FreeRunner knee brace for runners suffering from patellofemoral pain syndrome

Breg, Inc., a premier provider of sports medicine products and services, has launched the FreeRunner knee brace with new innovations to help people, particularly runners, who suffer from patella mal-tracking return to active lifestyles. [More]
Gene therapy can improve regenerative capacity of injured RGCs

Gene therapy can improve regenerative capacity of injured RGCs

Because the adult mammalian central nervous system has only limited intrinsic capacity to regenerate connections after injury, due to factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to the mature neuron, therapies are required to support the survival of injured neurons and to promote the long-distance regrowth of axons back to their original target structures. [More]
Researchers receive over $1M to study molecular foundations of pancreatic cancer

Researchers receive over $1M to study molecular foundations of pancreatic cancer

Alexandros Tzatsos, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of anatomy and regenerative biology at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, was awarded over one million dollars in grants from the National Institutes of Health to study the molecular foundations of pancreatic cancer. [More]
Lombard Medical exhibits Aorfix system at Critical Issues in Aortic Endografting symposium

Lombard Medical exhibits Aorfix system at Critical Issues in Aortic Endografting symposium

Lombard Medical, Inc, a medical device company focused on Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), exhibited its Aorfix Endovascular stent graft system at the 18th international experts' symposium, Critical Issues in Aortic Endografting, in Malmö, Sweden on June 27-28, 2014. [More]
Exceptional speed prior to formal training is prerequisite for becoming world-class sprinters

Exceptional speed prior to formal training is prerequisite for becoming world-class sprinters

New research shows world-class sprinters are born, not created. Grand Valley State University researchers found that exceptional speed prior to formal training is a prerequisite for becoming a world-class sprinter. [More]
3D mammography detects more invasive cancers, reduces call-back rates

3D mammography detects more invasive cancers, reduces call-back rates

3D Mammography finds significantly more invasive cancers and reduces unnecessary recalls, according to a large, retrospective study published in June 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
NIH receives $10 million grant for research on breast cancer metastasis

NIH receives $10 million grant for research on breast cancer metastasis

The American Cancer Society predicts that 40,000 American women will die from breast cancer this year. Most of those deaths will occur due to cells from the primary tumor that spread to other parts of the body-the process known as metastasis. [More]