Anemia News and Research RSS Feed - Anemia News and Research

Anemia is a decrease in normal number of red blood cells (RBCs) or less than the normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood. However, it can include decreased oxygen-binding ability of each hemoglobin molecule due to deformity or lack in numerical development as in some other types of hemoglobin deficiency. The three main classes of anemia include excessive blood loss (acutely such as a hemorrhage or chronically through low-volume loss), excessive blood cell destruction (hemolysis) or deficient red blood cell production (ineffective hematopoiesis). Anemia is the most common disorder of the blood. There are several kinds of anemia, produced by a variety of underlying causes. Anemia can be classified in a variety of ways, based on the morphology of RBCs, underlying etiologic mechanisms, and discernible clinical spectra, to mention a few.
Adequate levels of vitamin E critical for young, elderly and pregnant women

Adequate levels of vitamin E critical for young, elderly and pregnant women

Amid conflicting reports about the need for vitamin E and how much is enough, a new analysis published today suggests that adequate levels of this essential micronutrient are especially critical for the very young, the elderly, and women who are or may become pregnant. [More]
Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Eli Lilly and Company today announced that the RAISE trial, a Phase III study of ramucirumab (CYRAMZA) in combination with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), met its primary endpoint of overall survival. [More]
Simple point-of-care testing device provides more rapid diagnosis of anemia

Simple point-of-care testing device provides more rapid diagnosis of anemia

A simple point-of-care testing device for anemia could provide more rapid diagnosis of the common blood disorder and allow inexpensive at-home self-monitoring of persons with chronic forms of the disease. [More]
American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, shows research

American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, shows research

Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing of exams, tests and treatments that should be offered to all men of reproductive age. [More]
Expert creates new evidence-based guideline for managing sickle cell disease

Expert creates new evidence-based guideline for managing sickle cell disease

An expert panel has created a new evidence-based guideline for managing sickle cell disease (SCD), with a strong recommendation for the use of the drug hydroxyurea and transfusion therapy for many individuals with SCD, although high-quality evidence is limited, with few randomized clinical trials conducted for this disease, according to an article in the September 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers measure stiffness of membrane surrounding red blood cells over time

Researchers measure stiffness of membrane surrounding red blood cells over time

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois researchers. [More]
FDA approves Ferric Citrate for control of serum phosphorus levels in CKD patients on dialysis

FDA approves Ferric Citrate for control of serum phosphorus levels in CKD patients on dialysis

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Ferric Citrate (formerly known as Zerenex) for the control of serum phosphorus levels in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis. [More]
Scientists find that samples of chocolate purchased in Brazil contain lead and cadmium

Scientists find that samples of chocolate purchased in Brazil contain lead and cadmium

Scientists have found that commercial samples of chocolate purchased in Brazil contain varying levels of lead and cadmium, which can cause health problems, and that those levels are linked to how much cocoa a product contains. [More]
Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. [More]
InnoPharma receives FDA approval for generic DACOGEN

InnoPharma receives FDA approval for generic DACOGEN

InnoPharma, Inc. today announced the approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for decitabine for injection, a generic version of Eisai Inc.'s DACOGEN. [More]
Experimental drug shows promise as viable treatment for anemia of inflammation

Experimental drug shows promise as viable treatment for anemia of inflammation

An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. [More]
Penn receives orphan status in Europe for treatment of PNH

Penn receives orphan status in Europe for treatment of PNH

A Penn Medicine-developed drug has received orphan status in Europe this week for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a rare, life-threatening disease that causes anemia due to destruction of red blood cells and thrombosis. [More]
Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Aldea Pharmaceuticals announces closure of $24M Series B equity financing

Aldea Pharmaceuticals announces closure of $24M Series B equity financing

Aldea Pharmaceuticals, a company pioneering novel therapeutics to treat aldehyde metabolism disorders, today announced that it has closed a $24 million Series B equity financing. [More]
Pregnant teenagers engaged in pica have lower iron levels

Pregnant teenagers engaged in pica have lower iron levels

In a study of 158 pregnant teenagers in Rochester, NY, nearly half engaged in pica - the craving and intentional consumption of ice, cornstarch, vacuum dust, baby powder and soap, and other nonfood items, reports a new Cornell study. [More]
Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). [More]
Research hopes to protect hundreds of newborns from severe health problems by protein in milk

Research hopes to protect hundreds of newborns from severe health problems by protein in milk

An international effort led by the University of Sydney hopes to protect hundreds of Bangladeshi newborns from a host of severe health problems by assessing the effect of lactoferrin, a natural protein found in breast and cow's milk, in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. [More]
Epigenetics has a large say in blood formation

Epigenetics has a large say in blood formation

Blood stem cells have the potential to turn into any type of blood cell, whether it be the oxygen-carrying red blood cells, or the many types of white blood cells of the immune system that help fight infection. [More]
Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. [More]