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Repeated exposure to anesthesia early in life causes long-term behavioral changes

Repeated exposure to anesthesia early in life causes long-term behavioral changes

Repeated exposure to anesthesia early in life causes alterations in emotional behavior that may persist long-term, according to a study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in collaboration with the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, and published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Research findings may help explain why drug treatments for addiction, depression are not always effective

Research findings may help explain why drug treatments for addiction, depression are not always effective

New research may help explain why drug treatments for addiction and depression don't work for some patients. The conditions are linked to reward and aversion responses in the brain. Working in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered brain pathways linked to reward and aversion behaviors are in such close proximity that they unintentionally could be activated at the same time. [More]
Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

In use for more than a century, inhaled anesthetics like nitrous oxide and halothane have made modern surgery possible. Now, in experiments in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have added to evidence that certain so-called "volatile" anesthetics -- commonly used during surgeries -- may also possess powerful effects on the immune system that can combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung, including influenza and pneumonia. [More]
Bystander CPR can prevent brain damage, nursing home admission following cardiac arrest

Bystander CPR can prevent brain damage, nursing home admission following cardiac arrest

Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been linked to a 30% lower risk of nursing home admission and brain damage in survivors of cardiac arrest outside hospital in research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Kristian Kragholm, a PhD student in the Department of Anesthesiology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. [More]
National award presented to seven community health centers for innovation in diabetes care

National award presented to seven community health centers for innovation in diabetes care

BD, Direct Relief, and the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) honored seven of the nation's 1,200 community health centers with the Innovations in Care Award at this week's Community Health Institute and EXPO in Orlando, Florida. [More]
Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD with 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation

Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD with 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation

Based on its recent analysis of the intravenous drug delivery devices market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) with the 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation. The company's BD Intelliport System is the industry's first medication management system designed to overcome long-standing challenges associated with the administration of manual intravenous bolus injections. [More]
BD Life Sciences completes acquisition of Cellular Research

BD Life Sciences completes acquisition of Cellular Research

BD Life Sciences, a segment of leading global medical technology company BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), today announced it has completed the acquisition of Cellular Research, Inc. [More]
Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

In 2011, the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society issued a guideline recommending that neonates undergoing cardiac surgery for repair of congenital heart disease be placed on continuous encephalographic (EEG) monitoring after surgery to detect seizures. These recommendations followed reports that seizures are common in this population, may not be detected clinically, and are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. [More]
Pediatricians, mental health providers can improve outcomes in children with mental and behavioral disorders

Pediatricians, mental health providers can improve outcomes in children with mental and behavioral disorders

For the past decade, cutting-edge health care providers and researchers have increasingly pushed to integrate care for mental health and substance use problems within primary medical care for children and adolescents. [More]
Older patients more likely to be readmitted to hospital after ambulatory surgery

Older patients more likely to be readmitted to hospital after ambulatory surgery

Patients 65 and older who have ambulatory surgery are much more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days than younger patients, regardless of their health before surgery, reports a new, large national Northwestern Medicine study. The likely cause, based on previous research, is difficulty understanding medication dosing and discharge instructions, as well as cognitive impairment among older patients. [More]
BD reports adjusted revenues of $3.133 billion for third fiscal quarter 2015

BD reports adjusted revenues of $3.133 billion for third fiscal quarter 2015

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today reported quarterly adjusted revenues of $3.133 billion for the third fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2015, an increase of 45.2 percent over the prior-year period as reported, or 55.6 percent on a currency-neutral basis. On a comparable, currency-neutral basis, adjusted revenues grew 2.4 percent. As reported, revenues were $3.120 billion. [More]
Sleeping in lateral position may effectively remove brain waste, say Stony Brook researchers

Sleeping in lateral position may effectively remove brain waste, say Stony Brook researchers

Sleeping in the lateral, or side position, as compared to sleeping on one's back or stomach, may more effectively remove brain waste and prove to be an important practice to help reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseases, according to researchers at Stony Brook University. [More]

New set of clinical practice guidelines released to address temperature management during open heart surgery

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology have released a set of clinical practice guidelines to address management of a patient's temperature during open heart surgery. The guidelines appear in the August issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and were published simultaneously in two other journals. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Better pain relief options for individuals with chronic back and leg pain

Better pain relief options for individuals with chronic back and leg pain

Chronic back and leg pain sufferers in search of better pain relief options may have a new choice. According to a study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, patients who received a novel high frequency form of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy experienced significantly greater, long-term relief for both chronic back and leg pain, when compared to a traditional low frequency form of SCS therapy. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is not well understood. In a study published this week in Clinical Neurophysiology, MIT researchers reveal some key brainwave changes among patients receiving the drug. [More]
Results from Phase 3 study evaluating safety and efficacy of Zalviso published in Anesthesiology

Results from Phase 3 study evaluating safety and efficacy of Zalviso published in Anesthesiology

AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapies for the treatment of acute and breakthrough pain, today announced that results from the IAP311 study have been published in Anesthesiology. [More]

New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

Tremendous variability in wait times for health care appointments exists throughout the U.S., ranging from same day service to several months, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. However, there is currently an opportunity to develop "systems-based approaches" -- similar to systems-based engineering approaches applied successfully in industries beyond health care -- that aim to provide immediate engagement of a patient's concern at the point of initial contact and can be used in in-person appointments as well as alternatives such as team-based care, electronic or telephone consultations, telehealth, and surge capacity agreements with other caregivers and facilities. [More]
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