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Sleeping in lateral position may effectively remove brain waste, say Stony Brook researchers

Sleeping in lateral position may effectively remove brain waste, say Stony Brook researchers

Sleeping in the lateral, or side position, as compared to sleeping on one's back or stomach, may more effectively remove brain waste and prove to be an important practice to help reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseases, according to researchers at Stony Brook University. [More]

New set of clinical practice guidelines released to address temperature management during open heart surgery

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology have released a set of clinical practice guidelines to address management of a patient's temperature during open heart surgery. The guidelines appear in the August issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and were published simultaneously in two other journals. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Better pain relief options for individuals with chronic back and leg pain

Better pain relief options for individuals with chronic back and leg pain

Chronic back and leg pain sufferers in search of better pain relief options may have a new choice. According to a study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, patients who received a novel high frequency form of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy experienced significantly greater, long-term relief for both chronic back and leg pain, when compared to a traditional low frequency form of SCS therapy. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is not well understood. In a study published this week in Clinical Neurophysiology, MIT researchers reveal some key brainwave changes among patients receiving the drug. [More]
Results from Phase 3 study evaluating safety and efficacy of Zalviso published in Anesthesiology

Results from Phase 3 study evaluating safety and efficacy of Zalviso published in Anesthesiology

AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapies for the treatment of acute and breakthrough pain, today announced that results from the IAP311 study have been published in Anesthesiology. [More]
New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

Tremendous variability in wait times for health care appointments exists throughout the U.S., ranging from same day service to several months, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. However, there is currently an opportunity to develop "systems-based approaches" -- similar to systems-based engineering approaches applied successfully in industries beyond health care -- that aim to provide immediate engagement of a patient's concern at the point of initial contact and can be used in in-person appointments as well as alternatives such as team-based care, electronic or telephone consultations, telehealth, and surge capacity agreements with other caregivers and facilities. [More]
Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins have been shown to reduce complications from cardiovascular surgery. To determine whether statins might also help those undergoing major lung surgeries, a team at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center conducted a well-designed study that randomized patients to receive either a statin or placebo before and after surgery. [More]
WSU researchers receive U.S. patent for new anesthesia monitoring system

WSU researchers receive U.S. patent for new anesthesia monitoring system

A team of researchers from Wayne State University was recently issued a U.S. patent (# 8,998,808) on a technology that will offer anesthesiologists better methods for monitoring and managing patients in the operating room. [More]
Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

On Friday, May 22, an 18-member team of physicians and nurses from Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led an international collaboration to separate a pair of six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins, the first such operation ever performed on Haitian soil. [More]
WellSpan Health, CareFusion announce successful implementation of Alaris System in WellSpan hospitals

WellSpan Health, CareFusion announce successful implementation of Alaris System in WellSpan hospitals

WellSpan Health and CareFusion, a BD company, today announced the successful implementation of the Alaris System across all four WellSpan hospitals, with WellSpan York Hospital becoming the first hospital ever to simultaneously go-live with new infusion devices and bi-directional interoperability between the infusion device and the electronic health record (EHR). [More]
INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) announced winners today of its inaugural best abstract competition at the 12th World Congress in Montreal. [More]
Simple steps help accelerate recovery, reduce cost of care in people undergoing colorectal surgery

Simple steps help accelerate recovery, reduce cost of care in people undergoing colorectal surgery

Simple steps that include the consistent use of experienced medical teams for a single type of surgery, preemptive antibiotics before the procedure, less reliance on potent opioids during recovery and urging patients to get out of bed and move around sooner can not only prevent infections, blood clots and other serious complications in people undergoing colorectal operations, but can also accelerate recovery and reduce cost of care, according to results of an ongoing program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. [More]
Study suggests direct biophysical link between chronic pain, depression and anxiety

Study suggests direct biophysical link between chronic pain, depression and anxiety

Brain inflammation caused by chronic nerve pain alters activity in regions that regulate mood and motivation, suggesting for the first time that a direct biophysical link exists between long-term pain and the depression, anxiety and substance abuse seen in more than half of these patients, UC Irvine and UCLA researchers report. [More]
Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

In a finding important for preventing the development of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 22 other institutions have determined that the duration of antibiotic treatment for complicated abdominal infections can be cut by half and remain equally effective. [More]
Young children who receive surgical anesthesia have diminished brain function

Young children who receive surgical anesthesia have diminished brain function

Children who received general anesthesia for surgery before age 4 had diminished language comprehension, lower IQ and decreased gray matter density in posterior regions of their brain, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Withholding ARBs for longer than two days after surgery significantly increases risk of postoperative death

Withholding ARBs for longer than two days after surgery significantly increases risk of postoperative death

Withholding angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for longer than two days after surgery is associated with a significantly increased risk of postoperative death, according to a study of more than 30,000 patients in the VA health care system by researchers at UC San Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center. [More]
Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Mention "ultrasound" and most people likely will think of an image of a fetus in a mother's womb. But while providing peeks at the not-yet-born is one of ultrasound's most common applications, that's only a small part of the picture. [More]
Statins reduce risk of death by 67% in CABG surgery

Statins reduce risk of death by 67% in CABG surgery

Research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia exploring the protective effect of various heart medications that patients are taking before undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery concludes that statins reduce the risk of death by two thirds, or 67 percent, while no consistent effects were seen for other medications. [More]
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