Angiography News and Research RSS Feed - Angiography News and Research

Radial approach superior than femoral one for coronary angiography and PCI for ACS patients

Radial approach superior than femoral one for coronary angiography and PCI for ACS patients

For the first time, ESC Guidelines published today give the highest degree of recommendation for the radial approach over the femoral one for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). [More]
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out CAD in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain

Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out CAD in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain

Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
The future of MPI: an interview with Dr Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, University Hospital Schleswig Holsten

The future of MPI: an interview with Dr Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, University Hospital Schleswig Holsten

I’m Dr Panagiotopoulos and I am a resident at the University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein. I work in the Radiological and Nuclear Medicine Department, at the Lübeck campus. [More]
Angiography and MPI: an interview with Professor Mauro Magnani University of Urbino

Angiography and MPI: an interview with Professor Mauro Magnani University of Urbino

I am Mauro Magnani, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Urbino, Italy. My background is essentially the transition of activity from the lab to application. I am also the founder of a spin-off company called EryDel, which uses technology to load materials or drugs inside cells. [More]
OCT angiography shows promise in CNV detection

OCT angiography shows promise in CNV detection

Noninvasive optical coherence tomography angiography can successfully detect choroidal neovascularisation, research findings indicate. [More]
Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy shows distinct classification

Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy shows distinct classification

Researchers have found that idiopathic polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy has significant clinical differences to neovascular age-related macular degeneration and suggest that it should be considered a distinct entity. [More]
Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

New results in animals highlight a major safety concern regarding a class of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents used in millions of patients each year, according to a paper published online by the journal Investigative Radiology. [More]
Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

A recent study presented at the American College of Cardiology 64th Annual Scientific Meeting evaluated the impact of an age, sex, and gene expression score on clinical decision-making and the rate of further cardiac evaluation in symptomatic female patients suggestive of CAD in the outpatient setting. [More]
Study can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce Alzheimer's risk

Study can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce Alzheimer's risk

Armed with new knowledge about how neurodegenerative diseases alter brain structures, increasing numbers of neurologists, psychiatrists and other clinicians are adopting quantitative brain imaging as a tool to measure and help manage cognitive declines in patients. These imaging findings can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]
Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamy increases the risk of heart disease by more than 4-fold, reveals research presented at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology Congress 2015 (APSC 2015) by Dr Amin Daoulah, a cardiologist at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The risk and severity of heart disease increased with the number of wives. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
New OCT angiography can improve clinical management of leading causes of blindness

New OCT angiography can improve clinical management of leading causes of blindness

Research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences demonstrates that technology invented by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's Casey Eye Institute can improve the clinical management of the leading causes of blindness. [More]

Watching the blood flow

Optical microangiography (OMAG), a technique based on optical coherence tomography, can be used to visualize the microvasculature network under inflamed skin condition. It opens up new vistas for clinical trials of treatment and diagnosis of inflammatory skin disorders. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
Study finds no statistical difference between CTA and functional stress tests

Study finds no statistical difference between CTA and functional stress tests

A new type of CT scan initially costs slightly less than the traditional stress test to diagnose blocked coronary arteries in patients with chest pain, but its lower cost did not translate into medical care savings over time, according to an analysis by Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
Simple screening test can predict increased risk of heart disease in diabetic patients

Simple screening test can predict increased risk of heart disease in diabetic patients

A simple and inexpensive screening test can show which diabetic patients face an increased risk of heart disease, which can help them get the care they need, faster — and proactively reduce their risk of heart disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement