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Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

A cardiac imaging study led by Hossein Bahrami, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, along with investigators from Johns Hopkins University and five other institutions, showed a correlation between higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

According to a study carried out at the University of Helsinki, an infection of the root tip of a tooth increases the risk of coronary artery disease, even if the infection is symptomless. [More]
Cardiac troponin test refines ACS rule-out process

Cardiac troponin test refines ACS rule-out process

Testing high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes reduces their need for cardiac stress testing and speeds their discharge from the emergency department, report researchers. [More]
Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Patients with a low Athens QRS score are highly likely to have coronary artery disease even if they have a normal exercise stress test, say researchers. [More]
Right ventricular echocardiography predicts targeted therapy outcome in PAH

Right ventricular echocardiography predicts targeted therapy outcome in PAH

Echocardiography re-assessment of right ventricular function after targeted therapy is sufficient to predict subsequent prognosis in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
Artificial intelligence could refine CAD prognosis

Artificial intelligence could refine CAD prognosis

A study shows that machine learning can predict mortality in patients with coronary artery disease with greater accuracy than models based on coronary computed tomographic angiography or clinical variables. [More]
CMR could offer complete imaging solution before pulmonary vein isolation

CMR could offer complete imaging solution before pulmonary vein isolation

Cardiac magnetic resonance can potentially be used to detect thrombi at the same time as being used for pulmonary venous anatomy mapping, say researchers [More]
Neutral atherosclerosis trial highlights effectiveness of optimal medical therapy

Neutral atherosclerosis trial highlights effectiveness of optimal medical therapy

Salsalate has no greater effect than placebo on the progression of coronary artery plaque, show the findings of the randomised TINSAL-CVD trial. [More]
CMR 'may be preferable' to SPECT for CHD prognosis

CMR 'may be preferable' to SPECT for CHD prognosis

Long-term follow-up of the CE-MARC study suggests that cardiovascular magnetic resonance could be a better predictor of cardiovascular events than single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with coronary heart disease. [More]
Important signs, symptoms of stroke that everyone should know

Important signs, symptoms of stroke that everyone should know

Almost 795,000 Americans suffer from stroke each year, 130,000 which are fatal, making stroke the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. [More]
Study shows women undergoing TAVR have longer-term survival rate compared to men

Study shows women undergoing TAVR have longer-term survival rate compared to men

Data from one of the largest national registries of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients shows that although women are more likely to experience vascular complications in the hospital, their one-year survival rate is more favorable than men. [More]
Younger women more likely to experience one-year adverse cardiovascular events after PCI

Younger women more likely to experience one-year adverse cardiovascular events after PCI

Women younger than 55 years of age who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are more likely to experience one-year adverse cardiovascular events due to risk factors such as diabetes and chronic kidney disease, yet they are less likely to receive potent antiplatelet therapy than men. The PROMETHEUS study found that outcomes for both men and women post-PCI are dependent on their baseline risk factors, not their sex. [More]
Moderate sedation leads to better clinical outcomes than general anesthesia for TAVR patients

Moderate sedation leads to better clinical outcomes than general anesthesia for TAVR patients

A new study finds the use of moderate sedation, in which patients do not need a breathing tube, leads to better clinical outcomes as compared to general anesthesia for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). [More]
Study finds no gender-based differences on use of anticoagulation medications in TAVR patients

Study finds no gender-based differences on use of anticoagulation medications in TAVR patients

A study on the impact of using different anticoagulation medications on men and women who have undergone a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) found no difference in early vascular complications or mortality. [More]
Robotically assisted PCI could be viable alternative to manual procedure

Robotically assisted PCI could be viable alternative to manual procedure

A first-of-its kind study using robotic technology to remotely control coronary guidewires and stents reported on the feasibility of performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on patients with complex coronary lesions. Similar clinical outcomes compared to the PCI procedure performed manually were reported. [More]
New AVERT system can reduce radiographic dye volume in patients at risk of AKI

New AVERT system can reduce radiographic dye volume in patients at risk of AKI

In the largest study of its kind, a new device has been found to significantly reduce the volume of radiographic dye without decreasing image quality in patients who are at risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after undergoing a coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). [More]
Study analyzes PI, RI of patients who underwent AVM embolization and surgical resection

Study analyzes PI, RI of patients who underwent AVM embolization and surgical resection

Winner of the Louise Eisenhardt Traveling Scholarship, Sophia F. Shakur, MD, IFAANS, presented her research, Changes in Pulsatility and Resistance Indices of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Feeder Arteries after Embolization and Surgery, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Clinical study shows association between Corus CAD blood test scores and cardiovascular event rates

Clinical study shows association between Corus CAD blood test scores and cardiovascular event rates

CardioDx, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company specializing in cardiovascular genomics, announced today results from a genomic substudy of the NHLBI-funded Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain (PROMISE) trial in nondiabetic patients receiving the Corus CAD blood test. [More]
New tool facilitates shared decision-making between physicians and patients with chest pain

New tool facilitates shared decision-making between physicians and patients with chest pain

Patients visiting a hospital emergency department with chest pain who engaged with their physician in shared decision-making using a tool called Chest Pain Choice showed improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up care options compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician without the use of this decision aid, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Tests used for diagnosing heart disease appear to function differently for women and men

Tests used for diagnosing heart disease appear to function differently for women and men

Tests used to diagnose and assess the severity of coronary artery disease appear to function differently for women and men who have stable symptoms, according to researchers from Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
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