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Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

New research has found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism -- a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment. [More]
NPS MedicineWise Reducing Antibiotic Resistance program focuses on urinary tract infections

NPS MedicineWise Reducing Antibiotic Resistance program focuses on urinary tract infections

The next phase of the NPS MedicineWise Reducing Antibiotic Resistance program for health professionals has launched today focused on the complex topic of managing urinary tract infections (UTIs). [More]
Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company, today announced it has submitted its Group B Strep assay to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 510(k) clearance. [More]
Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy increases obesity risk in children

Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy increases obesity risk in children

A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that children who were exposed to antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy had a higher risk of childhood obesity at age 7. The research also showed that for mothers who delivered their babies by a Caesarean section, whether elective or non-elective, there was a higher risk for obesity in their offspring. [More]
Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

The 11th annual International Consortium on Anti-Virals (ICAV) symposium, Infectious Diseases: Global Public-Health Challenges of the Next Decade, will put the challenges posed by several infectious diseases under the microscope, including the Ebola virus, the H7N9 influenza virus, MERS coronavirus and dengue viruses, as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis. [More]
University of Sheffield scientists find significant rise in serious heart infection

University of Sheffield scientists find significant rise in serious heart infection

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have identified a significant rise in the number of people diagnosed with a serious heart infection alongside a large fall in the prescribing of antibiotic prophylaxis to dental patients. [More]
MUHC study examines effect of regular re-evaluation of antibiotic use on cost, C. difficile infection rates

MUHC study examines effect of regular re-evaluation of antibiotic use on cost, C. difficile infection rates

Resistance to antibiotics is an important health concern that affects both the spread of infections, like Clostridium difficile, and the medication budget. Researchers at the McGill University Health Centre examined the effectiveness of adopting an antibiotic "time-out" during treatment, which involves regularly re-evaluating the treatment strategy as the clinical situation evolves. [More]

NPS MedicineWise calls all Australians to join the fight against antibiotic resistance

As Antibiotic Awareness Week 2014 is held across Australia from 17-23 November, NPS MedicineWise is asking all Australians to imagine a world without antibiotics and join the fight against antibiotic resistance. [More]
New test can detect bloodstream infection with unprecedented speed, sensitivity

New test can detect bloodstream infection with unprecedented speed, sensitivity

A new bloodstream infection test created by UC Irvine researchers can speed up diagnosis times with unprecedented accuracy, allowing physicians to treat patients with potentially deadly ailments more promptly and effectively. [More]
Representatives from 40 countries meet to discuss plan for antimicrobial resistance

Representatives from 40 countries meet to discuss plan for antimicrobial resistance

Every year, 25,000 people die as a result of antimicrobial resistance in Europe. A global action plan against one of the greatest health threats of our time is the aim of a conference being held in Oslo on 13th-14th November. [More]
Platelet-like nanoparticles mimic human body's coagulation process

Platelet-like nanoparticles mimic human body's coagulation process

Stanching the free flow of blood from an injury remains a holy grail of clinical medicine. Controlling blood flow is a primary concern and first line of defense for patients and medical staff in many situations, from traumatic injury to illness to surgery. [More]
Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Scientists from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology have used the power of new genomic technology to discover that microbes that commonly infect the eye have special, previously unknown properties. These properties are predicted to allow the bacterium -- Streptococcus pneumoniae -- to specifically stick to the surface of the eye, grow, and cause damage and inflammation. [More]
Antibiograms could improve antibiotic effectiveness, help address problems with antibiotic resistance

Antibiograms could improve antibiotic effectiveness, help address problems with antibiotic resistance

Use of "antibiograms" in skilled nursing facilities could improve antibiotic effectiveness and help address problems with antibiotic resistance that are becoming a national crisis, researchers conclude in a new study. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Published in Nature Biotechnology, the study at the University of Liverpool showed that specially engineered lipid (fat) bodies, called liposomes, can be used to prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells. [More]
Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

We've known about chemicals that can be light-activated for about five to ten years now. They’ve mainly all been applied to neurons and, more specifically, the retina. Nobody has ever really looked at any tissues outside of the nervous system. [More]
Researchers develop new test to identify drugs that could work against Lyme disease

Researchers develop new test to identify drugs that could work against Lyme disease

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a test they say will allow them to test thousands of FDA-approved drugs to see if they will work against the bacteria that causes tick-borne Lyme disease. [More]
Ruthigen enrolls first patient in Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RUT58-60

Ruthigen enrolls first patient in Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RUT58-60

Ruthigen, Inc., announced today enrollment of the first patient in a Randomized, Double-Blind Phase 1/2 clinical trial to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and potential efficacy of its lead drug candidate, RUT58-60, for use as an adjunct to systemic antibiotics in abdominal surgery. [More]
Astellas' isavuconazole gets FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of invasive candidiasis

Astellas' isavuconazole gets FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of invasive candidiasis

Astellas announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation to isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. [More]