Antibodies News and Research RSS Feed - Antibodies News and Research

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute all parts of the National Institutes of Health, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. [More]
AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO has introduced new cell lines and controls for Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) research, and to test inhibitors of the PD-1 / PD-L1 pathway. [More]
Scientists isolate antibodies capable of neutralizing dengue and Zika virus

Scientists isolate antibodies capable of neutralizing dengue and Zika virus

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, in collaboration with Imperial College London and the University of Vienna, Austria, have identified antibodies that can efficiently neutralize both the dengue virus and the Zika virus. [More]
Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

A molecule that enables strong communication between our brain and muscles appears to also aid essential communication between our neurons, scientists report. [More]
Pre-existing dengue antibodies can intensify Zika virus infection

Pre-existing dengue antibodies can intensify Zika virus infection

Previous exposure to the dengue virus may increase the potency of Zika infection, according to research from Imperial College London. [More]
Scientists streamline total synthesis of uncialamycin drug

Scientists streamline total synthesis of uncialamycin drug

A team led by Rice University scientists has improved the production of a potent anti-tumor antibiotic known as uncialamycin. [More]
MAIT cells of immune system can fight all sorts of bacterial and viral infections

MAIT cells of immune system can fight all sorts of bacterial and viral infections

Oxford University research has found that a little-studied and relatively unknown part of the human immune system could be twice as important as previously thought. [More]
Protein-based CHD risk score developed

Protein-based CHD risk score developed

Researchers have screened over 1000 plasma proteins to develop a predictive score in patients with stable coronary heart disease. [More]
Study finds increase in pollen allergies among Swedish adults

Study finds increase in pollen allergies among Swedish adults

The prevalence of pollen allergies among adults in Sweden has increased. However, the prevalence of allergies to furred animals, mites or mold has not. These were the results of a new study at Sahlgrenska Academy. [More]
Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

A team of researchers has elucidated individual profiles of allergy reactivity in patients that are not protected after treatment with immunotherapy. The aim is to improve medical treatment of people who are allergic to insect stings. [More]
TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

In the 1950s, thalidomide (Contergan) was prescribed as a sedative drug to pregnant women, resulting in a great number of infants with serious malformations. Up to now, the reasons for these disastrous birth defects have remained unclear. [More]
People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

Measuring antibody levels in the blood could be used to detect a person's heart attack risk after researchers, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, discovered that higher levels of these antibodies are linked to a lower heart attack risk. [More]
Diabetic mothers three times more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

Diabetic mothers three times more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

Mothers of children with autism and were diagnosed with metabolic conditions during pregnancy, particularly gestational and type 2 diabetes, were more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies in their blood compared to healthy women of children with autism. [More]
AMSBIO introduces new TIGIT receptor products for immunotherapy research

AMSBIO introduces new TIGIT receptor products for immunotherapy research

AMSBIO has launched a range of new TIGIT receptor products including a Jurkat cell line, Homogeneous assay kits and recombinant proteins for immunotherapy research. [More]
New immunotherapy treatment could change the way cancer is treated

New immunotherapy treatment could change the way cancer is treated

In late 2015, former President Jimmy Carter announced that he was free of the metastatic melanoma that had spread to his liver and brain. In addition to surgery and radiation, Carter was treated with an immunotherapy drug, a new approach in cancer treatment that has a promising outlook. [More]
FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancers have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system. [More]
Breastfeeding may improve heart development in premature babies

Breastfeeding may improve heart development in premature babies

Breastfeeding premature babies improves long-term heart structure and function, an Oxford University study has found. [More]
Study provides more insight into treatment options for severe hemophilia A

Study provides more insight into treatment options for severe hemophilia A

Families of children with severe hemophilia A may want to take a fresh look at treatment options from human plasma. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on May 26 showed that participants who received a recombinant therapy— the present standard in the United States — developed antibodies or "inhibitors" to the treatments at almost twice the rate as those whose treatments were made from human plasma. [More]
Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models. [More]
Physical workload could increase odds of developing RA

Physical workload could increase odds of developing RA

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that prolonged repetitive physical workload increases the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement