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Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

The Oswaldo Cruz Foundation at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, will start the phase II clinical trials of a vaccine for schistosomiasis, called 'Sm14 Vaccine'. [More]
IRB Barcelona review article provides insights into emerging field of shuttle peptides

IRB Barcelona review article provides insights into emerging field of shuttle peptides

IRB Barcelona researchers publish a review article on the emerging field of drug transporters that have the capacity to reach the brain more efficiently. [More]
Chromatrap develops new range of optimised ChIP assay kits for genetic research

Chromatrap develops new range of optimised ChIP assay kits for genetic research

Chromatrap is a pioneer in the development of solid-state filter-based technology that significantly enhances and accelerates the important epigenetic research tool of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). [More]
Cedars-Sinai study identifies metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria

Cedars-Sinai study identifies metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria

Biomedical investigators at Cedars-Sinai have identified an enzyme found in all human cells that alerts the body to invading bacteria and jump-starts the immune system. [More]
Three like-minded nonprofits collaborate to launch immunotherapy clinical trial for pediatric brain tumors

Three like-minded nonprofits collaborate to launch immunotherapy clinical trial for pediatric brain tumors

A Kids' Brain Tumor Cure Foundation, Solving Kids' Cancer and the Ty Louis Campbell Foundation announce their joint financial support of a Phase 1 clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of combination checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of children with brain tumors. [More]
Assigning barcode to stem cells makes it possible to monitor large blood cell populations

Assigning barcode to stem cells makes it possible to monitor large blood cell populations

By assigning a barcode to stem cells, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made it possible to monitor large blood cell populations as well as individual blood cells, and study the changes over time. [More]
Four iGEM undergraduate competition teams supported by BMG Labtech

Four iGEM undergraduate competition teams supported by BMG Labtech

BMG LABTECH, a leading manufacturer of microplate readers, recently supported four iGEM teams with a microplate reader to fuel their participation at the annual iGEM competition. [More]
NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

A chance observation in a Southern California fast food restaurant led Luis Martinez, Ph.D., to wonder about the connections behind wound healing problems and methamphetamine use. [More]
Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss

Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss

A large screening programme has identified several genes associated with age-related conditions including hearing loss, retinal degeneration and osteoarthritis. [More]
New ATA recommendations offer guidance for managing all forms of thyrotoxicosis

New ATA recommendations offer guidance for managing all forms of thyrotoxicosis

New evidence-based recommendations from the American Thyroid Association provide guidance to clinicians in the management of patients with all forms of thyrotoxicosis (excessively high thyroid hormone activity), including hyperthyroidism. [More]
St. Jude scientists identify key innate immune sensor that attacks influenza virus

St. Jude scientists identify key innate immune sensor that attacks influenza virus

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital immunologists have identified the protein trigger in the body's quick-reaction innate immune system that specifically recognizes the influenza virus in infected cells and triggers their death. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Industrial chemicals exceed safety levels in public drinking water supplies for 6 million Americans

Industrial chemicals exceed safety levels in public drinking water supplies for 6 million Americans

Levels of a widely used class of industrial chemicals linked with cancer and other health problems--polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs)--exceed federally recommended safety levels in public drinking water supplies for six million people in the U.S., according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. [More]
TSRI scientists zoom in to view how experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus

TSRI scientists zoom in to view how experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute now have a high-resolution view of exactly how the experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus. [More]
Immunotherapy innovations in oncology: an interview with Robert LaCaze

Immunotherapy innovations in oncology: an interview with Robert LaCaze

The body’s immune system is an excellent weapon against many diseases. For more than 100 years, immunology and immunotherapy have played an ever-increasing role in the understanding and treatment of cancer. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Botulinum toxins may cause remote effects by moving between neurons

Botulinum toxins may cause remote effects by moving between neurons

The botulinum toxins are among the deadliest substances on Earth, and two specific toxins — including the popular drug Botox — have multiple uses for treating many neuromuscular conditions, including frown lines, disabling muscle spasms and migraine headaches. [More]
Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

A month after announcing that two promising vaccine candidates provided mice with complete protection against the Zika virus, a research team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in collaboration with scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the University of São Paulo, now reports achieving complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys. [More]
Researchers report promising vaccine strategy for immunizing against herpes viruses

Researchers report promising vaccine strategy for immunizing against herpes viruses

Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which both cause lifelong infection. HSV-2 infection is associated with increased risk for HIV infection. [More]
NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a clinical trial of a vaccine candidate intended to prevent Zika virus infection. [More]
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