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UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

More than 20 percent of all blood clots in veins occur in cancer patients. These clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), pose serious threats for cancer patients. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
Age no barrier to vorapaxar use in ACS

Age no barrier to vorapaxar use in ACS

The protease-activated receptor 1 inhibitor vorapaxar offers the same benefits to older and younger patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, shows further analysis of the TRACER trial. [More]
Pioneering deck of cards created to support AF diagnosis and management in primary care

Pioneering deck of cards created to support AF diagnosis and management in primary care

A pioneering deck of cards created to support the diagnosis and management of Atrial Fibrillation (AF) in primary care is this week being launched across the North East and North Cumbria. [More]
Women less likely to receive good anticoagulant therapy for AF-related stroke, say researchers

Women less likely to receive good anticoagulant therapy for AF-related stroke, say researchers

Female atrial fibrillation patients are less likely than their male counterparts to receive blood thinning therapies to prevent stroke, say University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Computerized decision support tool can assist physicians in prescribing stroke prevention therapy

Computerized decision support tool can assist physicians in prescribing stroke prevention therapy

Physician-researchers in the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati have developed a computerized decision support tool that uses a combination of patient information and characteristics to assist physicians and patients with decisions about blood thinning treatment to prevent strokes in individuals with atrial fibrillation. [More]
Reasons for life-threatening blood clots in elite athletes

Reasons for life-threatening blood clots in elite athletes

Mary Cushman, M.D., M.Sc., a professor of medicine and director of the Thrombosis and Hemostasis Program at the University of Vermont, provides commentary on the causes of life-threatening blood clots in elite athletes. [More]
New oral blood thinners can decrease stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients without frequent monitoring

New oral blood thinners can decrease stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients without frequent monitoring

A new generation of blood thinners can reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, without requiring frequent monitoring and dietary restrictions. [More]
Researchers find major gap in treatment for AF patients at higher risk for stroke

Researchers find major gap in treatment for AF patients at higher risk for stroke

Nearly half of all atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at the highest risk for stroke are not being prescribed blood thinners by their cardiologists, according to a new study by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco. [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Medical scientists examine potential new tool for helping prevent stroke, heart attack

Medical scientists examine potential new tool for helping prevent stroke, heart attack

Medical scientists just vetted a potentially powerful new tool for helping prevent stroke and heart attack. In a study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers show that a drug reduced the risk of stroke or heart attack by almost a quarter in patients who had previously suffered a stroke or mini-stroke. [More]
Increasing medication adherence: an interview with Dr Alejandro (Alex) Jaimes

Increasing medication adherence: an interview with Dr Alejandro (Alex) Jaimes

Adherence applies to multiple levels of healthcare. Before a drug goes on the market it has to undergo testing in clinical trials: participants take the study drug and report how well the drug works, along with any side effects. [More]
Differences in patient education level may compromise safety, efficacy of anticoagulants

Differences in patient education level may compromise safety, efficacy of anticoagulants

Patients with no schooling benefit least from blood thinning medications, reveals a European Heart Rhythm Association / European Society of Cardiology survey published today in Europace. [More]
Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

A review of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors highlights the need to consider cardiovascular adverse event risk profiles when prescribing for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the availability by prescription of DURLAZA, the first and only 24-hour, extended-release aspirin capsules (162.5mg) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the secondary prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events, including myocardial infarction (heart attack) in high-risk cardiovascular patients. [More]
MUSC researchers receive PCORI grant to study safety, effectiveness of three blood-thinning drugs

MUSC researchers receive PCORI grant to study safety, effectiveness of three blood-thinning drugs

A research team at the Medical University of South Carolina has been approved for a $13.5 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study the safety and effectiveness of three blood-thinning drugs used to prevent potentially deadly blood clots in patients undergoing hip and knee replacement. [More]
Women suffering from blood clots can safely take hormone replacement therapy with anticoagulants

Women suffering from blood clots can safely take hormone replacement therapy with anticoagulants

New research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), is the first to demonstrate that women on blood thinners can take estrogen-containing contraception or hormone replacement therapy without an increased risk of blood clots or uterine bleeding. [More]
American College of Cardiology launches new STS/ACC TAVR In-Hospital Mortality Risk App

American College of Cardiology launches new STS/ACC TAVR In-Hospital Mortality Risk App

The American College of Cardiology has launched a new STS/ACC TAVR In-Hospital Mortality Risk App and an extensively overhauled the ACC AnticoagEvaluator App, bolstering its expansive Clinical App Collection. With these new and improved apps, the ACC continues to diversify the clinical content and decision support it offers clinicians in the mobile space. [More]
Study: Preoperative use of blood-thinning drugs associated with decreased risk of blood clots

Study: Preoperative use of blood-thinning drugs associated with decreased risk of blood clots

Among patients undergoing major cancer operations, the preoperative use of blood-thinning drugs such as heparin does not increase rates of major bleeding or transfusions, and is associated with a decreased risk of blood clots, according to new study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons ahead of print publication early next year. [More]
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