Antidepressant News and Research RSS Feed - Antidepressant News and Research

Antidepressants are medicines that treat depression. Your doctor can prescribe them for you. They can improve your mood, sleep, appetite and concentration. It may take several weeks for them to help. There are several types of antidepressants. You and your doctor may have to try several before finding what works best for you.
Brain stimulation effective for treatment of depression

Brain stimulation effective for treatment of depression

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. [More]

Three-stage PI CME initiative helps physicians improve diagnosis, care for depression

A performance improvement initiative for physicians can significantly increase their use of evidence-based practices in screening for and treating depression, in the July Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. [More]
Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing and prescribing omissions in older adults examined by new study from RCSI

Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing and prescribing omissions in older adults examined by new study from RCSI

A new study from RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) and Trinity College Dublin, which examined the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) and prescribing omissions in older Irish adults, has found that 14% of people over the age of 65 has been prescribed at least one inappropriate form of medication in their lives and 30% have not been prescribed clinically indicated medications, at least once in their lives. The [More]

Study analyzes effects of antidepressant drugs on well-being in children and adolescents

In an article published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics the effects of antidepressant drugs on well-being in children and adolescents are analyze. [More]
Study analyzes difference between day hospital and inpatient stay in depression

Study analyzes difference between day hospital and inpatient stay in depression

A study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics has analyzed the difference between day hospital and inpatient stay in depression. [More]
Viewpoints: Expanding Hobby Lobby decision; the faux war on women; dispute over pelvic exams

Viewpoints: Expanding Hobby Lobby decision; the faux war on women; dispute over pelvic exams

The Supreme Court wasted no time in delivering a message to anyone who thought its Hobby Lobby ruling was limited to religious objections to coverage of purported abortion methods: You're wrong. [More]
Factors linked to bipolar cycle acceleration identified

Factors linked to bipolar cycle acceleration identified

Researchers have identified factors that are associated with cycle acceleration in patients with bipolar disorder admitted to hospital for a mood episode. [More]
Combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and medication reduces relapse in depressed youths

Combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and medication reduces relapse in depressed youths

Cognitive behavioral therapy in addition to medication improves the long-term success of treatment for children and adolescents suffering from depression, a new UT Southwestern Medical Center study indicates. [More]
Antidepressant risk in bipolar patients limited to monotherapy use

Antidepressant risk in bipolar patients limited to monotherapy use

Antidepressants may cause problems in patients with bipolar disorder only when they are used in isolation, research suggests. [More]
Henry Ford launches clinical trial for treatment of tinnitus caused by noise trauma

Henry Ford launches clinical trial for treatment of tinnitus caused by noise trauma

Henry Ford Health System has launched a clinical trial to investigate a new drug for the treatment of tinnitus, a chronic ringing of the head or ears that affects more than 600 million people worldwide. [More]
Weizmann Institute scientists 'fingerprint' a culprit in depression and anxiety disorders

Weizmann Institute scientists 'fingerprint' a culprit in depression and anxiety disorders

According the World Health Organization, such mood disorders as depression affect some 10% of the world's population and are associated with a heavy burden of disease. That is why numerous scientists around the world have invested a great deal of effort in understanding these diseases. Yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie these problems are still only partly understood. [More]
New hope for people suffering from depression

New hope for people suffering from depression

There is new hope for people suffering from depression. Researchers have identified a compound, hydroxynorketamine (HNK), that may treat symptoms of depression just as effectively and rapidly as ketamine, without the unwanted side effects associated with the psychoactive drug, according to a study in the July issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-). [More]
Researchers develop rapid-acting antidepressants for treatment-resistant depression

Researchers develop rapid-acting antidepressants for treatment-resistant depression

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have generated fresh insights that could aid in the development of rapid-acting antidepressants for treatment-resistant depression. [More]
New prescription weight-loss medication combines antidepressant with addiction medication

New prescription weight-loss medication combines antidepressant with addiction medication

A new prescription weight-loss medication that combines a popular antidepressant with a medication for addiction will be reviewed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for potential approval. [More]
Alkermes initiates FORWARD-3 and FORWARD-4 efficacy studies in pivotal clinical program for ALKS 5461

Alkermes initiates FORWARD-3 and FORWARD-4 efficacy studies in pivotal clinical program for ALKS 5461

Alkermes plc today announced the initiation of FORWARD-3 and FORWARD-4, two of the three planned phase 3 core efficacy studies in the pivotal clinical program for ALKS 5461, a once-daily, oral investigational medicine with a novel mechanism of action for the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). [More]
Tiny molecule may provide marker for depression

Tiny molecule may provide marker for depression

Levels of a small molecule found only in humans and in other primates are lower in the brains of depressed individuals, according to researchers at McGill University and the Douglas Institute. [More]
Common antidepressant use during pregnancy may contribute to higher risk of ASD in children

Common antidepressant use during pregnancy may contribute to higher risk of ASD in children

A new study from researchers at Drexel University adds evidence that using common antidepressant medications during pregnancy may contribute to a higher risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children, although this risk is still very small. [More]
Allowing PTSD patients to choose their own treatment is less expensive, shows study

Allowing PTSD patients to choose their own treatment is less expensive, shows study

A cost-analysis of post-traumatic stress disorder treatments shows that letting patients choose their course of treatment - either psychotherapy or medication - is less expensive than assigning a treatment and provides a higher quality of life for patients. [More]
Case Western Reserve physician calls on FDA to address hidden risk of dangerous drugs side effects

Case Western Reserve physician calls on FDA to address hidden risk of dangerous drugs side effects

The agency charged to protect patients from dangerous drug side effects needs to be far more vigilant when it comes to medications that affect blood pressure. [More]
Anti-depressants could slow onset of Alzheimer's disease

Anti-depressants could slow onset of Alzheimer's disease

A University of Pennsylvania researcher has discovered that the common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram arrested the growth of amyloid beta, a peptide in the brain that clusters in plaques that are thought to trigger the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]